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Double Feature: Attack of the Soul-Sucking Brain Zombies/Bride of the Soul-Sucking Brain Zombies: Volume 3 (The Russel Middlebrook Series) Paperback – 2 Dec 2012

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Frequently Bought Together

  • Double Feature: Attack of the Soul-Sucking Brain Zombies/Bride of the Soul-Sucking Brain Zombies: Volume 3 (The Russel Middlebrook Series)
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  • The Order of the Poison Oak: Volume 2 (The Russel Middlebrook Series)
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  • The Elephant of Surprise: Volume 4 (The Russel Middlebrook Series)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 276 pages
  • Publisher: BK Books (2 Dec. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 098467943X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0984679430
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 876,606 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

I am Brent Hartinger, and I live to write.

For the last twenty years, I have made my living writing just about everything that involves words.

My most famous book is probably my 2003 novel, Geography Club, which has been adapted into a feature film starring Scott Bakula, Marin Hinkle, Ana Gasteyer, Cameron Deane Stewart, Justin Deeley, Ally Maki, Andrew Caldwell, and Nikki Blonsky. It'll be released in 2013.

I've since written two sequels to Geography Club, with two more forthcoming. I call the whole group of books The Russel Middlebrook Series.

I like to write for all ages, but I particularly like writing for and about teenagers. I think it's because I identify so strongly with them. Whenever I hear an adult complain about a teenager, I almost always take the side of the kid, even without hearing his or her version of the story!

For the record, I try hard to write books that people *like* to read. The most frequent comment I get from readers is that my books are "page-turners," which makes me very happy, because that is exactly what I want them to be. My biggest complaint with books I hate is that they don't get to the point (or, worse, they don't *have* a point!).

My second great love is the theatre. My plays have been performed at dozens of theaters across the country. And I adapted Geography Club into a stage play, which has been successfully produced many times. I've also written a play version of my young adult thriller Grand & Humble. (If you're involved with a theater and want a copy of either script, contact me: brentsbrain@gmail.com)

I also sometimes teach writing, in the MFA program in Writing for Children and Young Adults at Vermont College and elsewhere.

I live in Seattle, Washington, with my partner, the writer Michael Jensen, and I answer all email (even if it sometimes takes a while!).

Brent Hartinger
www.brenthartinger.com


My "Official" Biography:

BRENT HARTINGER is the author of a number of novels, mostly for and about teens, including Geography Club (HarperCollins, 2003) and three sequels: The Order of the Poison Oak (HarperCollins, 2005); Double Feature: Attack of the Soul-Sucking Brain Zombies/Bride of the Soul-Sucking Brain Zombies (HarperCollins, 2007); and The Elephant of Surprise (2013).

His other books include The Last Chance Texaco (HarperCollins, 2004); Grand & Humble (HarperCollins, January 2006); Project Sweet Life (HarperCollins, 2008); and Shadow Walkers (Flux Books, 2011).

Mr. Hartinger's many writing honors include being named the winner of the Lambda Literary Award, the Scandiuzzi Children's Book Award, a GLAAD Media Award, and a Book Sense Pick (four times).

A feature film version of his first novel, Geography Club, will be released in 2013, starring Scott Bakula and Nikki Blonski.

Hartinger is also the author of many award-winning screenplays and plays, including a stage adaptation of Geography Club, which has received regional productions in Tacoma, Salt Lake City, Edmonton, and elsewhere. A feature film version of his play The Starfish Scream, which has also received many regional productions (and was twice produced Off-Off Broadway in New York), is in active development for a possible 2014 release.

Hartinger is a sometime-member of the faculty at Vermont College in the MFA program in Writing for Children and Young Adults, and is also the co-founder of the entertainment website AfterElton.com, which was sold to MTV/Viacom in 2006.

He lives in Seattle with his partner, writer Michael Jensen.

Product Description

About the Author

Brent Hartinger is an author, teacher, playwright, and screenwriter. Geography Club, the first book in his Lambda Award-winning Russel Middlebrook Series, is now a feature film co-starring Scott Bakula and Nikki Blonsky. In 1990, Brent helped found one of the world's first gay teen support groups, in his hometown of Tacoma, Washington. In 2005, he co-founded the entertainment website AfterElton.com, which was sold to MTV/Viacom in 2006. Read more by and about Brent, or contact him at www.brenthartinger.com.

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By TeensReadToo TOP 500 REVIEWER on 15 Mar. 2007
Format: Hardcover
In ATTACK OF THE SOUL-SUCKING BRAIN ZOMBIES, Russel is forced to choose between the guy right at home that he wants, and the guy 500 miles away that he loves. He's also dealing with his parents, who have found out that he's gay and are none too pleased.

When you flip the book over and start reading BRIDE OF THE SOUL-SUCKING BRAIN ZOMBIES, it's Min's story that will have you rapidly flipping pages. When Min meets Leah, she has to decide if this girl, the girl she might be in love with, is worth having a hidden relationship, something Min never wants to do again.

Gunnar and Kevin are two very interesting characters that appear in both stories, which chronicle very different experiences as extras in a weird monster movie. You have to read both stories to find out the whole of the one story; they are different stories, yes, but together they do make up one whole, very good storyline.

Occasionally the writing seemed a little too simple, but the great stories and characters really make up for that. Important issues are addressed admirably in this wonderful book that readers of Hartinger's previous books (especially those featuring this same cast of three-dimensional characters) will love!

Reviewed by: Jocelyn Pearce
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By Abbie on 29 Jan. 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 24 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Split Screen shows teens aren't zombies 2 Feb. 2007
By 24mark - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Brent Hartinger writes great teen novels: they have strong plots with unforeseeable twists; they're filled with clever dialogue and funny one-liners; and most important, they're stocked with good-hearted (though occasionally wrong-headed) characters who remind readers of what they love about their own friends--their brilliance and loyalty, their passion for their beliefs, and their ability to remember one's good points and still catch one's failings.

Hartinger delivers on all these strengths once again in his new novel "Split Screen." It's the third in a series, but it's a sequel with an innovative spin: it tells the same story twice from two points of view, demonstrating that even best friends experience things differently, and that life's big questions--like who to love, and when to be brave--don't always have just one right answer.

The book follows "The Geography Club" and "The Order of the Poison Oak" to tell the stories of high school student Russell Middleton and his circle of cool but less-than-popular friends. In previous books, Russell and his pals formed a gay-straight alliance to make their school a safer, more open place and then managed to survive summer camp with nothing worse than bruised hearts and itchy rashes. "Split Screen" catches up with them in the fall of their junior year as they sign up to work as extras on the set of a horror movie filming right in their hometown.

When read one way, the book tells Russell's story of boyfriend and parent troubles: just as he's anticipating a Thanksgiving visit from his steady guy, his unsteady ex begins trying to win him back, sending Russ into an emotional spin. And to top it off, Russell's parents come unhinged from reason when they (belatedly) find out that he's gay. It's a mess.

But flip the book over, and the same events are told in a different version by Russell's good friend Min, a brainier-than-thou girl who tries to live her life according to staunch principles. She aspires not just to honesty but to forthrightness, and that sort of candor is causing her problems. Min's new girlfriend (who's completely awesome and totally sharp) is set on being two different people: one version for Min and another entirely for her friends at school. It's also a mess.

Hartinger excels at giving Russell and Min distinct voices and at making their similar struggles unique: Russ is pulled more by his heart whereas Min follows her head--he worries most about being misunderstood or hurting someone; she's terrified at her uncertainty when her clear ideals jam up against life's murkier situations.

This novel's greatest strength (from among many) may be that Hartinger gives both his main characters truly perplexing dilemmas. One could see them choosing either way--the old boyfriend or the new, a path of compromise or one of confrontation--and sympathize with the reasons behind the decision. Rather than present his teen readers with simplistic answers, he instead suggests that the act of deciding is itself the main event: Life can't be lived on autopilot, and no one can choose better than the person in the cockpit.

"Split Screen" brings a great deal of fun, but it also digs deep into exactly the sort of questions that teens face as they go about the hard work of growing up. It's a romp with good friends, and it's a book that gives a lot of respect to the right and responsibility of young people to make important choices for themselves.

Recommended for readers ages 12 and older.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Double Feature = double reading 1 July 2013
By Uniquely Moi Books - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is the third installment of The Russel Middlebrook series. The beginning events of this book does make it worth the read, I just didn't expect the second half to come out the way it did. An interesting concept, but I just felt like I was rereading much of it over again.

The time has come that Russel's parents finally hear what their son has been up to and what the club he attends every week is about. He isn't prepared for their questions but is honest and forthcoming with his answers. He definitely stands firm in his beliefs and feelings.

The other exciting and interesting thing is that there is a movie that is taking place and they are looking for teens to fill the roles of zombies. I found that concept to be neat. It's when the second part of the book starts, which is a different perspective, looking in on Russel's life,that I had troubles getting into. It did offer more to the story, it just didn't grab me like I hoped it would.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Enjoyable 24 April 2007
By Edward Aycock - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I enjoyed this book more than I did "The Order of the Poison Oak", and just slightly less than "The Geography Club" (books that also feature the characters in Split Screen.) The reason why I didn't enjoy it as much as "Geography Club" partly has to do with the original always being one's favorite, but that "Split Screen" wasn't long enough. Yes, we do get two full stories but I'd have been happier with one expanded tale focusing on Russel. I admit, I didn't find Min's story as interesting, but she's never been one of my favorite characters anyhow.

That aside, Hartinger's writing has grown stronger and leaner without sacrificing quality or character development. Plus, the unique aspect of a low-budget zombie film is a fun catalyst and the brief glimpses we get of the filmmaking experience are illuminating. I think most people will enjoy this book, and considering Russel's dilemma with his parents, I'm hoping we get another.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Great characters and sharp story telling - a warm, mix of laughs and tears 7 Mar. 2007
By 1846 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Maybe it was the cheesy cover and campy title, or maybe it was the two-for-one gimmick. But as much as I enjoyed "Geography Club" and "The Order of Poison Oak," I approached this latest Brent Hartinger opus with reduced expectations. I should have known better. It didn't take long to realize my error as reveled in this fresh, beautifully written, funny, and yet emotionally moving story that once and for all turned Russel Middlebrook into one of my two all-time favorite juvenile lit main characters. (My other is Beverly Cleary's Leigh Botts. Okay, I'm a pushover for main characters who are wholesome, thoughtful, nice kids.)

The decision to tell the story twice from two points of view proved not a mere gimmick, but a clever way to tell the story most effectively. Hartinger braids three stories together - Min's and Russel's separately, as well as the third story thread of the movie filming, which is common to both of the other two. The redundancies are never annoying and sometimes used for comic effect, such as when Gunnar, who tells the same rather long story in each version, comments "it's the second time in two days that I've told it."

I debated whether to read "Attack" first or "Bride." I was glad I decided to start with "Attack." The motivation of one main character is masked at the end of "Attack," but revealed in "Bride," so to me there is more impact in reading "Bride" last. Min has never interested me as much as Russel, so "Bride" got off to a slower start for me, but Min won me over.

Hartinger has created a cast of totally believable characters, whom I can deeply care about as a reader. The conflicts he has left dangling at the end leave me eagerly await the promised installment written from Kevin's POV.

I originally purchased "Geography Club" because, as a teacher with a strong interest in the YA genre, I had not yet read a gay-themed teen novel. I was quickly hooked on the characters and wanted more. However, there came a point this time around when I decided I was NOT reading a gay-themed novel at all. I was simply reading a great story in which some of the characters were gay. Perhaps that is the highest compliment I can pay this author.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
An interesting new way to read a great story 8 Jun. 2007
By Brian C - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Brent Hartinger has done it again. This is another great book in the Geography Club story line. The book stands alone, but you can get more out of it if you read the first two books in the series, Geography Club, and The Order of the Poinson Oak.

This book is a very interesting book. It is not just one book, but two books in one. The books tells a story of the same time in space, from the viewpoints of two characters. The first one is from Russel, and the second, his best friend Min. You read the first book, and then flip it over to get the second book. You get to see some of the same events, but from the viewpoint of the other character. There is also some things that are revealed when you read the second book.

I found the story to be engrosing, and I couldn't stop reading. The characters are well done, and the wisdom in the book is something to think about. I think that any teen will love this book. There are some twists and turns in the plot that are great, and a few mysteries that are revealed as more that they appear. There is one loose end that doesn't get tied up by the end of the book, and I truely hope that Hartinger writes another book to tie up this loose end. If his is, I eagerly await it.

This book is a definite read for anyone.
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