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Dorian Gray [Blu-ray]

168 customer reviews

Price: £5.20 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 11 left in stock (more on the way).
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£5.20 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 11 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Actors: Colin Firth, Ben Barnes, Rachel Hurd-Wood, Rebecca Hall, Fiona Shaw
  • Directors: Oliver Parker
  • Producers: Barnaby Thompson
  • Format: Blu-ray
  • Region: Region B/2 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Momentum Pictures
  • DVD Release Date: 18 Jan. 2010
  • Run Time: 112 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (168 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B002SVP9GO
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 33,907 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Audio: English 5.1 dtr HD Sub-titles: English for the Hard of Hearing.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 20 Jan. 2015
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
The resurrected Ealing Studios' 2009 version of Dorian Gray feels very much a case of one step forward, two steps back. Unlike the classic 1945 version of Oscar Wilde's most famous work laxer censorship means we can actually see some (but not enough to harm the TV sales) of the sin and depravity that corrupts its ever youthful antihero's soul and leaves the map of his misdeeds on his portrait instead of his own face. Unfortunately director Oliver Parker, while not as misguided here as in his modern day comedies, is so fanatically devoted to keeping the story moving above all other considerations that apart from the odd party scene he never really summons up much of a decadent atmosphere, leaving that sort of thing to the production design department.

On the plus side it has Colin Firth on good form as Lord Henry Wotton, Dorian's guide in his descent into immorality with a bitter witticism to justify every degeneracy, and there's a good if a tad uninspired supporting cast. Unfortunately they have to work overtime to compensate for void at the film's centre courtesy of a very awkward Ben Barnes, who plays the pre-deal with the Devil Dorian like a newborn simpleton and only marginally improves once he embraces the pleasures of the flesh (he's at his best in the later scenes after Dorian realises that pleasure and happiness are very different). It doesn't help that his first shot in the film has such a bizarrely waxy appearance that he looks like an Auton, one of the killer shop tailor dummies from Doctor Who, an impression only enhanced by his unnatural movement.

Sadly Rachel Hurd-Wood, so good as Wendy in the 2003 Peter Pan, is even worse as Sibyl Vane, now an actress playing Hamlet's Ophelia rather than Juliet (so no prizes for guessing how she'll end up in this version).
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45 of 50 people found the following review helpful By GratuitousViolets TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 6 Feb. 2010
Format: DVD
Ben Barnes stars in this watchable remake of Dorian Gray. Dorian, a young handsomely beautiful nobleman, is cursed and blessed with a strange gift after an exquisite portrait of him is painted. The eerily lifelike painting begins to haunt Dorian, showing strange signs of life and aging while he himself remains forever, young and flawless. But the curse of the painting comes with consequences as the young man begins to lose all sense of himself and evil begins to envelop his life.

While not as atmospheric or entertaining as the black and white original, the movie is still watchable. Almost touching the epitome of old gothic horror, this has a feel of Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street about it (almost Burton-esque in feel). Ben Barnes is an ideal cast of Dorian, as although he is certainly handsome, also has something of a charcoal-eyed alien ugliness about him that fits the latter of his performance quite well. The film embodies the underground of the Victorian era quite well with it's flashes of unabashed eroticism, blatant drug use and the superior attitudes of male upper-class.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By rbmusicman/and/movie-fan' TOP 100 REVIEWER on 5 Oct. 2014
Format: Blu-ray
The story has seen many adaptations down the years, and i'm certain will see many more in the times to come, however, in my opinion this is far and away the best to date.
It tells the story of 'Dorian'(Ben Barnes) a young man gifted with good looks and charm.
A portrait captures his gifts perfectly, when 'Henry'(Colin Firth) befriends 'Dorian' a different and seedy option in life is shown to 'Dorian' he likes what he see's and 'sells' his soul in exchange for eternal youth.
The film is intense at times as it follows 'Dorian' to the depths of depravity.
The portrait ages, but he does not, but there will come a time when he questions his pact with evil.
This is a very good film, it would be a crime in my view to miss it.
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126 of 150 people found the following review helpful By Amanda Pike on 25 Dec. 2009
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I finally was able to see the 2009 version of Dorian Gray, adapted from the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde.
I am writing this review AS an Oscar Wilde fan. I have read The Picture of Dorian Gray twice and I have read The Canterville Ghost twice.

I am going to tell you right now that these negative reviews that claim that this film is an insult to Oscar Wilde are WRONG! It's as if people who know very little about th works of Oscar Wilde are following a trend.
Those that say this would make Oscar Wilde roll over in his grave clearly have never seen the dreadful mid 2000s version of The Picture of Dorian Gray that re-sets it in the 1960s with a female Basil with horrendous acting. And they clearly have never seen the 1940s version of The Canterville Ghost that turned the entire story into World War 2 propaganda about a solider having to prove himself against a nazi.

I will admit that this not a word for word faithful adaptation of the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray however it is very true to the heart of the novel, the meaning and purpose. The character portrayals are perfect and accurate. All changes are purely superficial. I know Ben Barnes as Dorian does not resemble the character of the novel however he does resemble Oscar Wilde himself and since Oscar Wilde saw himself in Dorian I felt this was a brilliant use of visual symbolism in Wilde's own relationship with Dorian Gray.

I know that some people have complained about the adding of the character Emily Wotton, whom does not exist in the novel. What people fail to remember is that nearly all film versions of The Picture of Dorian Gray have this 'redeemer' character. In the 1940s movie her name was Gladys.
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