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Don't stop the carnival Hardcover – 1965


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Hardcover, 1965
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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Collins; 1st British Edition edition (1965)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0002211564
  • ISBN-13: 978-0002211567
  • ASIN: B0000CMM4M
  • Product Dimensions: 21.1 x 14.5 x 3.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,522,837 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Book Description

How far would you go to realise your dreams? --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Herman Wouk is the author of The Caine Mutiny, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, The Winds of War, War and Remembrance, and Inside, Outside. His latest novel is The Lawgiver, a romantic comedy about the seeming impossibility of making a movie about the life of Moses. Born in the Bronx in 1915, he has lived in Manhattan, the Virgin Islands, and Washington, DC. He now resides in Palm Springs, California. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 3 May 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is a must for anyone visiting the Caribbean!
Norman Paperman decides to leave New York to start running a small hotel in the Caribbean. The ideal turns to strife when the layed-back attitude of the Caribbean starts to cause him problems; his bartender runs away, the cistern runs out of water (and then collapses after a heavy rainfall), the chamber maids run away, his builder leaves him half-way through construction of some new rooms, but Norman manages to overcome all these hurdles and more!
The book highlights the attitudes and dificulties of living and working in the tropics; just because you are used to things working in civilisation, doesn't mean they will work the same way here!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By M. J. Taylor on 30 Oct 2005
Format: Paperback
Working in an island hotel and having traveled extensively around the Caribbean over the last 20 years have often experienced fading traces of the life and society Hermann Wouk so gently describes. The sad thing is that as "A reader from St John, A US Virgin Island" so rightly comments, there are few instances of real “island life” and few opportunities to embark on such an adventure today, the 21st century and many it’s social ills having arrived along with the tourist dollars. Lucky we are to be able to seek refuge in this enjoyable book!
That is probably the reason I have read the book several times. It’s a fun read and the story is quite easy to fit into. The love-story bit is not really necessary and is clumsily recounted, spoiling the credibility of the rest of the book a little.
I often offer a copy of “Don’t Stop The Carnival” to arriving colleagues, it’s a good read after a gloomy day especially if you are lounging in your hammock on the veranda sipping a rum-punch with some soft reggae or Jimmy Buffet on the CD player (try that at home …).
The story has apparently been filmed, with an appropriate Jimmy Buffet score. Unfortunately the film seems to be unavailable – I have been looking for it for years. Read Jimmy Buffet’s kindly written “A Pirate turns 50” to get another view of what we all thought it would be like when we came here. Patrick Leigh Fermor’s “The Traveller’s Tree” will give you a more authentic and nostalgic, though sometimes even more hilarious account.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 30 Aug 1998
Format: Paperback
Don't Stop the Carnival is a breeze to read. It has a deep theme, but you don't have to read deep into it to get it. Sometimes, sadly enough, there are no extreme measures you can take to make your life better. I identified with Norman Paperman, and got a laugh out of all his mishaps (thinking, "that sort of thing would happen to me"). Despite the theme, it is not a pessimistic book at all. Wouk also tells us that we have to make the best out of what we have, or "roll with the punches". The lively characters and tragic ending reminded me of Hemingway (Whom I am also a fan of).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 13 Sep 1998
Format: Paperback
This book definitely IS worth the price of admission. I found, however that it started slowly, with Wouk giving the background of the main character in NYC. The background is, however, necessary, in order to appreciate what follows. Humor, tension, unpredictability, local color, intrigue, sex, extramarital affairs, adventure, oddball characters, the evolution of incompetence and ignorance to independence and efficiency all combine to make this an enjoyable read. I did, however, find the ending just a little disappointing. Not enough to not recommend the book, though. I listened to Buffett's soundtrack of the stage production about 7 times before I read the book. Now I can see where the songs come from. It gives them more meaning and makes me appreciate them even more. For an escape to that proverbial tropical island, this is a cheap and easy way to get there. It's a light read. It's not Michener's "Centennial," but it sure isn't Hawthorne's "Billy Budd" (from college) either. One more thing. It was copyrighted in 1965. It's nearly like looking through a window of time. Actually, I was surprised at some of the words used back then (same as today) and also the euphemisms used. You'll see what I mean. Hey, get the book. It's a page turner.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 25 May 1999
Format: Paperback
I too was captured by Jimmy Buffetts' Musical score of this Carribean Adventure, and wanted to read his inspiration. Herman Wauk is now one of my favorite authors. I could really sympathize with Norman Paperman, and I found myself falling in love with Iris as the story went on. Hats off to you Mr. Wauk I will pursue the rest of your works and read them all!!!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 July 1998
Format: Paperback
I too read this book as a result of Jimmy Buffet's musical. At first I was disappointed with what appeared to be a shallow story line. However, after some reflection, I realized that Herman Wouk wasn't just telling a story, he was narrating a psychological transformation in Norman Paperman. Norman Paperman goes off to the Caribbean in search of dreams escaping the mundane life he had worked so hard to create. After living the dream for a short time, he realized that his prior life and family wasn't so bad after all. The book ends with Norman Paperman selling his hotel to another seeking his life's dream. Norman Paperman went through his mid-life crisis and another begins.
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