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Don't You Know Who I Am?: Insider Diaries of Fame, Power and Naked Ambition Hardcover – 5 Apr 2007


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Ebury Press; First Edition edition (5 April 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0091913918
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091913915
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 15.6 x 3.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 561,181 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 37 people found the following review helpful By russell clarke TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 27 Oct 2007
Format: Hardcover
I rather like Piers Morgan .Sure he is a vain , egocentric ,occasionally pompous, often wincingly smug human being but he is also reasonably witty , balanced and truly capable of laughing at him self. He also writes very entertaining books. "The Insider" was as addictive as something very addictive indeed and the follow up -which takes in his career post the "Mirror" sacking - is equally as compulsive. It is also a rather shallow examination of the trappings of fame and celebrity which basically amounts to Morgan saying I wanted to become rich and famous and here's how I went about it.
Thus this book takes in his break into mainstream television through humiliating appearances on "The Weakest Link ", the political show "Morgan And Platell " , "You Can't Fire Me I'm Famous" through to his big break through stateside with "America's Got Talent". Like "The Insider" it's written in diary form and is basically a heady trawl through all the celebrities, politicians( who he admits he finds mainly boring , duplicitous and only interested in one thing -themselves) and media people he meets along the way.
Through his "GQ" contact to interview numerous celebrities there are revealing conversations with Billie Piper( a very naughty girl indeed) ,Steve Coogan, Ulrika Johnson and most strikingly George Galloway who makes a truly conspicuous statement that is then frustratingly not followed up on later in the book.
Simon Cowell ( Seems a reasonable bloke apart from his hideous product but then Morgan would portray him that way wouldn't he) , "The Hoff David Hasselhoff ( Completely deranged and insecure)Anne Robinson , various cricketers , Gordon Ramsey ( Surprisingly likable) pop up regularly throughout the proceeding s.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. J. A. Collins on 6 May 2008
Format: Paperback
This book was a lighthearted read, but it becomes so apparent that Morgan truly does think of himself as a big-time celebrity long before he made it big on America's Got Talent. I would imagine that most people bought this book to read about gossip about various celebrities, and - like me - really aren't interested in Morgan's conversations with his children or gilfriend. He writes like he's a celebrity and worthy of a great deal of attention. He's not.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dr. M von Vogelhausen on 29 April 2009
Format: Paperback
Let me first say that I'm so glad that someone as well known and well off as Piers has been given a lucrative book deal - it's about time that yet another good thing should fall into his lap. He is a bit of a shrinking violet so this oxygen of publicity will, I'm sure, be most welcome. Some would say that Piers is one of those who are famous for being famous. This is manifestly untrue - in fact he lives on the edge of this group of people, and makes his living from them, like a parasite, but in a good way. I bought this book because I was fascinated to hear the deep thoughts of an ex-tabloid editor who helped spearhead the new, bracing intrusiveness of the printed press. His honesty (which some dunderheads would term 'ignorant rudeness') is also refreshing, in much the same way that a water cannon is. I imagine.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By SilentSinger TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 28 Nov 2009
Format: Paperback
It's difficult to know whether to like or hate Piers Morgan, on the one hand he can sometimes come across as unbelievably smug, but on the other his humour is so self deprecating that he's entertaining and amusing. Anyway, having read Morgan's first book The Insider this volume took up the story after his infamous Mirror sacking and sees him trying to earn a living as a freelance journalist/after dinner speaker/celebrity. He bumbles along and manages some amusing faux passes along the way, especially in regard to securing a secure TV job and his ongoing feuds with other media types such as Jeremy Clarkson and Charlie Brooker are interesting.

The chapters surrounding Morgan's work on American Idol with Simon Cowell are well worth a read, if nothing else for his take on fellow judge David `The Hoff' Hasselhoff. His wooing of journalist Celia Walden is also quite sweet, but the really telling segments are his interviews with various people for GQ and his summary of Kate Moss is incredibly perceptive. The diary entries which pertain to his love of Arsenal football club or various cricket events are fairly boring, but otherwise an excellent book and a somewhat guilty pleasure as I'm sure you'll agree!
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Damocles on 11 Jun 2007
Format: Hardcover
In his previous book, The Insider, Piers Morgan regarded the world of the rich and famous from the position of power bestowed by his status as tabloid editor. Now deprived of his job, he decides to plunge into the world of celebrity, seeking what he describes as "fame, the fastest-growing career option in the country." In Don't You Know Who I am? he invites us to join him on his journey.

At one level this is a diary of celebrity gossip, a humorous compendium of anecdotes involving a veritable galaxy of today's stars. At another it is a sweeping portrayal of modern British (and American) culture, at a time when celebrity obsession holds so many people in thrall. What is most striking about Morgan's book is how balanced it is as a study of celebrity culture: Piers is clearly intrigued by people such as Katie Price (Jordan) and particularly David Hasselhoff, who becomes virtually the icon of the book. On the one hand they seem to lack qualities which make them deserving of the adoration they receive, but on the other they are able to hold the attention of millions simply through sheer force of personality. The Hoff's unique brand of self-deprecating egoism has turned him into an undisputed cult icon, a comic colossus, and Morgan relishes this paradox, even embracing it himself. But the book is not just about raw celebrity: the best moments are where we are given glimpses of humanity. In Ian Botham we are presented with a truly great man of our times, marshalling his formidable abilities in his charity work against leukaemia even more than he did against his opponents on the cricketing field.
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