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Don't Look Now - 1 Disc Edition [DVD]

191 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Donald Sutherland, Julie Christie, Hilary Mason, Celia Matania, Massimo Serrato
  • Directors: Nicolas Roeg
  • Producers: Peter Katz
  • Format: PAL
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Optimum Home Releasing
  • DVD Release Date: 25 May 2009
  • Run Time: 105 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (191 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0026R7BPC
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 64,069 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Nicolas Roeg's chilling film, based on a short story by Daphne du Maurier, follows a married couple as they attempt to recover from the death of their young daughter. John Baxter (Donald Sutherland) and his wife, Laura (Julie Christie), are staying in Venice in an attempt to find relief after the drowning of their daughter, Christine (Sharon Williams), in a tragic accident. However, the city appears to have an unfortunate effect upon the grieving John, who begins seeing a red-coated figure who resembles the dead child flitting around the local canals. The couple also happen across a pair of sisters who claim to have had visions of their daughter. According to the sisters, the child has been trying to contact John in an attempt to warn him that something terrible is about to happen...

From Amazon.co.uk

Don't Look Now was filmed in 1973 and based around a Daphne Du Maurier novel. Directed by Nicolas Roeg, it has lost none of its chill: like Kubrick's The Shining, its dazzling use of juxtaposition, colour, sound and editing make it a seductive experience in cinematic terror, whose aftershock lingers in daydreams and nightmares, filling you with uncertainty and dread even after its horrific climax. Donald Sutherland plays John Baxter, an architect, Julie Christie his wife: a well-to-do couple whose young daughter drowns while out playing. Cut to Venice, out of season, where the couple encounter a pair of sisters, one of whom claims psychic powers and to have communicated with their dead daughter. The subsequent plot is as labyrinthine as the back streets of the city itself, down which Baxter spots a diminutive and elusive red-coated figure akin to his daughter, before being drawn into an almost unbearable finale. Don't Look Now is a Gothic masterpiece, with its melange of gore, mystery, ecstasy, the supernatural and above all grief, while the city of Venice itself--which thanks to Roeg and his team seems to breathe like a dark, sinister living organism throughout the movie--deserves a credit in its own right. Not just a magnificent drama but an advanced feat of cinema. --David Stubbs --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Anthony J. Thorne on 30 Jun. 2011
Format: Blu-ray
Nicolas Roeg's stylish and frightening occult thriller has gained in critical appreciation since it was originally released nearly four decades ago(!), and this extras-laden Blu-Ray set does it justice by gathering together the various supplemental features from earlier home video editions along with newly shot interviews with Donald Sutherland and additional crew members. I doubt anyone will be too disappointed with the extras on this disc. That noted, the audio and visual remaster featured on this Blu-Ray is of particular importance as it offers a significant upgrade in both picture and sound to all earlier home video editions. The colourful picture is noticeably sharper than earlier DVD editions and does a great job of showcasing Roeg's remarkable, often near-hallucinatory imagery. Perhaps even more importantly, the sound is equally improved and eliminates the various distortion issues that plagued earlier DVD releases. DON'T LOOK NOW came out on DVD in both the USA and UK a few years back and various online forums did their best to decide which of the two sounded superior. Sadly, each DVD sounded pretty rotten and did little justice to the film, the dialogue or Pino Donaggio's haunting score. This new Blu-Ray (proudly displaying a cover sticker noting "Picture and Audio Restoration Supervised and Approved by Nic Roeg") fixes those issues entirely and presents the movie in a clearly listenable form for perhaps the first time on home video. It sounds terrific.

DON'T LOOK NOW is a masterpiece and this Blu-Ray provides a definite, welcome upgrade from any DVD edition you might own. Now, could someone do a special edition of Roeg's weird, sexy and stylish EUREKA?
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Abi Sullivan on 22 Dec. 2005
Format: DVD
Don't Look Now is not so much a horror film as a psychological thriller. It stars Julie Christie and Donald Sutherland as husband and wife, John and Laura Baxter, who lose their young daughter in a drowning accident in England. However, the majority of the film takes place against the backdrop of the dilapidated ruins and dark alleyways of Venice where the couple involuntarily meet a pair of mysterious, slightly creepy old English sisters, one of whom is both blind and psychic. She informs Laura that their daughter is trying to communicate with them from beyond the grave and as the film unravels it becomes apparent that the message is more of a warning that something macabre may happen to John.
The film is littered with hints and cryptic symbolism which can be read into on many levels. The use of colour, particularly red, runs through the film, uniting several themes and evoking unspoken ideas about passion, danger, murder and blood.
The pace is fairly slow and some scenes don’t appear to make much sense, however, I believe this has been done on purpose so that the viewer can interpret the film through individual eyes and it is ultimately up to the viewer to decide the sense of the ending.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Stampy on 20 Jan. 2010
Format: DVD
John Baxter (Sutherland) and his wife Laura (Christie) struggle to move on after their daughter's death and when in Venice they meet a blind psychic who sees the spirit of their daughter.

Based on Daphne Du Maurier's fantastic novel, this British film aims high to depict the hard nature of a story transfixed with powerful and emotionally involved deaths the tough bond of marriage and all the while, Don't look Now will please neutrals if reader's of the book may feel a little hard done by.

The opening montage is a brilliant selection of the type of film we viewers are gearing up. Two children playing apparently safely are left on their own by their parents who are mixed up in their own world. What follows is a striking shot in which Donald Sutherland's John sprints out of the house and we see a high angled shot looking down into the expressionless eyes of his daughter, floating in the water. This scene is staggering, made powerful through the sudden shock of aimless playing and a father trying his best to save her.

Whilst the film begins with the grizzly opening the book opens with the married couple sat in the restaurant discussing the people around them.

Changing tactic from calm to shocking allows us to be engrossed into proceedings and sets the upcoming drama. I confess to not loving this change, particularly after witnessing the too quick cut from Laura's view of John clutching their daughter. Nevertheless the rest of the film picks up the dramatic implication of the tragedy as the cut switches into the restaurant where the sisters are introduced.

The beauty of a book is imagination and to adapt such a provocative story such as this makes our assumptions different.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Ben Elliss on 15 Mar. 2000
Format: VHS Tape
This landmark film is a classic. Partly an examination of grief's effects on a family and partly a psychological horror-thriller, it is engaging until the last seconds. Julie Christie and Donald Sutherland play a distraught couple, travelling around Europe to erase the memory of their daughter's drowning. When they arrive in Venice, however, they find hints that the girl may, in fact, still be alive. The ending of this film outdoes 'Carrie' for shock value - it has the potential to give you nightmares for several weeks after seeing the movie!
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