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  • Don't Look Back [DVD] [1967] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
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Don't Look Back [DVD] [1967] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]


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Product details

  • Language: English
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: U
  • Studio: Docurama
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000035P7X
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 108,103 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Documentary 1965, 96 minutes, Feat: Joan Baez, Alan Price, Donovan and Albert Grossman; When acclaimed documentary filmmaker D.A. Pennebaker (Monterey Pop, The War Room) filmed Bob Dylan during a three week concert tour of England in the Spring of 1965, he had no idea he was about to create one of the most intimate profiles of the musician ever put on film. Wanting to make more than just a concert film, Pennebaker sought both the public and private Bob Dylan. With unobtrusive equipment and rare access to the performer, he achieved a fly-on-the-wall glimpse of one of music's most influential figures. Hailed as one of the best documentaries about a performing artist ever created, 'Don't Look Back' is more than a view of an extraordinary concert tour - Bob Dylan's last as a solo acoustic performer. It's 'a portrait of the young Dylan tearing the pop world apart!' (S.F. Examiner) Five original, uncut audio performances/Spectacular new digital transfer/Commentary from D.A. Pennebaker and tour road manager, Bob Neuwirth/Never-before-seen version of 'Subterranean Homesick Blues' cue card scene/Original theatrical trailer/D.A. Pennebaker filmography /Bob Dylan discography/Biographies of the cast and crewMedium 1
  1. It Ain't Me, Babe
  2. It's All Over Now, Baby Blue
  3. The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll
  4. To Ramona

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By slangandthepigeons on 19 May 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Even if you're familiar with the original movie, this is well worth getting if you're a fan. The extra disk contains plenty of outtakes and some fine live bits that complement and illuminate the main feature. There's also a booklet containing a painstaking transcript of all the dialogue - not an easy task considering this is a documentary and not a scripted movie. Plus to round it all off there's a little flipbook of the "Subterranean Homesick Blues" video!
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Henry Fielding on 2 Nov. 2007
Format: DVD
"Advertising signs they con you into thinking you`re the one, who can do what`s never been done, who can win what`s never been won, meantime life outside goes on alround you". So sings the Court Jester during the live performance of "It`s alright Ma, I`m only bleeding" ho,ho,ho. Has anything changed since then? Yes, Dylan himself, many, many times. The master of reinvention. Spokesman of a Generation, Judas to the Folk movement or the first Punk Rocker? Did Bob Dylan ever stand still?

The dramatic progress he made from Coffee House Folkie to Electric Rock Protagonist is unparalleled in Musical History, no one before or since has moved so far so fast. The most notable example of this trend is evidenced in the footage shot by D.A. Pennebaker shown here, much of which is actually one of the first examples of hand held camera work, that later became the vogue. Donovan performs in a hotel room to Dylan and his entourage, including Alan Price of the Animals, Joan Baez and Bob Neuwirth. Donovan`s song is simple, a pure rendition of "To catch the wind" a good folk song. Dylan responds with "It`s all over now, Baby Blue." Literally light years ahead lyrically, but as if to make a point, is performed in the same style of delivery as Donovan`s song. It is an embarrasing moment for the Bard`s desciple but just goes to show the gulf that exsisted between Dylan and his contempories.

The young Punk side of his character comes to light in the equally embarrassing interviews with The Science Student and The Time Magazine Journalist. Dylan is actually not as obnoxious as he appears, since he tries to explain to both parties, why he is berating them. He might as well be from Mars judging by their reaction.

This is the solo acoustic Dylan on tour in the U.K.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ben Wilkinson on 10 May 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
As soon as Subterranean Homesick Blues kicks in at the start I noticed that it's pitched higher than it should be. It remains like that throughout the whole of that first disc, the voices not sounding quite right throughout the dialogue too. I've tried it with VLC, WMP, thru my DVD/TV etc.

The second disc (65 Revisited) is fine though..

Is this the same for anybody else?!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Ruth O'D on 7 April 2010
Format: DVD
This DVD is basically a fly on the wall of Dylan's 1965 British tour, the year before he 'went electric'. It is an odd, disjointed hotch-potch of material and to those who have never fallen under Dylan's spell it will appear a complete waste of time.

But... I think it's amazing. It is shot in black and white, with the young Bob Dylan looking unbelievably 'cool' throughout as he travels to and from various concerts, chats with fans or sits around in his hotel room with his large entourage of hangers-on (including Joan Baez who looks understandably embarrassed and out of place).

Highlights include his verbal attack on a hapless Time magazine reporter who can't get a word in edgeways and his interrogation of a pompous student who tries to get inside his head; in both cases Dylan is unbelievably arrogant and sure of himself as he baffles his would-be interviewers with rather bizarre arguments but I have to admit I found it rather satisfying to see someone fighting back against smug media know-it-alls. Other fascinating scenes include Dylan's meeting with the officious 'High Sheriff's Lady', to whom he is polite and gracious though obviously bemused, and a sequence where we see his manager, Albert Grossman, wheeling and dealing, looking like an extra from a Humphrey Bogart film or a distant relative of Jabba the Hut.

To the outsider this will look like a badly-shot, black & white, home movie, However, to me Dylan's presence and power seem to shine through every scene, he is a magnetic and fascinating character in himself, even if he hadn't also written some of the best songs of the 20th century.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ronny Søgård on 24 May 2011
Format: DVD
This is a classic. D.A Pennebaker followed Dylan on his three week tour in England in early 1965. It`s all shot in black and white. You can see Dylan on stage, in conversation with fans, journalists and artists such as Joan Baez and Donovan. You basically follow Bob and his crew and friends around on this acoustic tour. Very interesting!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By @GeekZilla9000 TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 5 Feb. 2012
Format: Blu-ray
D. A. Pennebaker's candid documentary covers some great moments from Bob Dylan's '65 England Tour. Instead of lots of concert footage we get behind-the-scenes activity such as the mad dash from the venue to the car, or the more relaxed moments in the hotel room where key figures from the folk scene and Dylan's people hang out.

The film starts with the iconic Subterranean Homesick Blues sequence which has since been labelled the first ever music video, it's a great introduction and establishes Dylan as a playful wordsmith, his playfulness continues during the film as he seems to entertain himself during interviews with the press. His whimsical responses in press conferences seem to bemuse, amuse, and frustrate the press who seem desperate to sum up Dylan and his 'message' in one simple phrase but won't give them the sound-bites they are so desperate to jot down. Dylan comes across as an artist at the top of his game but the documentary doesn't exist as sycophantic hero-worship, if anything he is sometimes a bit detached and his chemistry with those around him is often a bit cold apart from the odd moment of great humour. Dylan's relationship with Joan Baez was on the wane and that's apparent here, though they sing together and spend time in close company there's none of the cheeky smiles or warmth which you see in archive footage from before this time.

Negotiations over the rates for TV appearances, a tired Bob Dylan taking his glasses off to rub his eyes as he travels by train, and interviewers asking the same questions demonstrate how a major tour is often not just about the music, and the moments where Dylan is on stage are pure magic - it's him and the music.
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