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Why Men Don't Listen and Women Can't Read Maps: How We're Different and What to Do about It Paperback – 10 May 2001


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Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Broadway Books; 1 Reprint edition (10 May 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0767907639
  • ISBN-13: 978-0767907637
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 1.8 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 904,239 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Book Description

The bestselling, must-read book. Understand - at last - why men never listen, why women can't read maps and why learning each others secrets means you may never have to say sorry again. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Allan Pease is the world's foremost expert on body language. His acclaimed book Body Language has sold over 4 million copies and his top rated TV series on the same subject has been seen by over 100 million people world-wide. He travels the world lecturing on human communication and has written four other bestselling books. Barbara Pease is CEO of Pease Training International which produces videos, training courses and seminars for business and governments world-wide. She is the author of the international bestseller Memory Language. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mrs C Cavanagh on 25 Oct. 2001
Format: Paperback
This book hits the nail on the head for all those women out there that can't understand why men don't understand us and for all those men why you find us all so complicated. I laughed from the minute I started to read this book it is light hearted but would help couples worldwide to understand why things seemed not to be going as they thought there relationships would. The answers are so obvious that they are probably there all the time, love is a blinker thing sometimes. This book helps clarify things in a lighthearted and funny way. An excellent read for mis-understoods everywhere.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 23 Aug. 2001
Format: Paperback
Based on 12 years of clinical research on the male/female brains. An interesting, funny and enlightening read. Understanding your differences is the key to putting them in their place and laughing at them instead of fighting about them or feeling resentment and frustration. It also makes you aware of why you are the way you are, therefore, eliminating the need to prove yourself as anything else. For everyone in a relationship of any kind.
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Format: Paperback
I was particularly interested in the difference on how to read maps between men and women. I hadn't recognized that before, though. Certainly, it is strange to turning the map around so often. It seems quite logical to most women to turn the map according to the direction where they are going, while men think it's ridiculous. In this case, men have better spacial skills than women, I guess. On the other hand, Allan and Barbara Pease also seemed to say that men get more distracted than women. What does it mean? According to this book, men generally hate being talked to while driving. I just wondered why men have this sort of downside in spite of their great spacial skills. At first, I thought this applied to new and/or poor drivers because they tend to be too nervous to talk while driving. However, I gradually found out that it is a matter of how to arrive faster at where they are headed for. Overall, it may be hard to judge either spacial skills outweigh concentration or vice versa.
So I wish both men and women could use well-balanced spacial skills and concentration. Therefore, they wouldn't have to waste their energies on arguments in cars.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 12 May 1999
Format: Paperback
After reading all the great 5 crown reviews I was looking forward to reading this book and dived straight in. To begin with I found it good fun, although the large type-font and block quotes reiterating arguments made in the main text are a bit irritating. However, it soon becomes apparent that the authors have only one point to make and I found myself desperately hoping, in vain as it happens, that the discussion was going to get somewhere and then move on. But no, they just keep making the same point over and over. This does start to wear on you after a while. As a professional biologist I was very disappointed at the lack of reasoned discussion about the vast amount of evidence they allude to in support of their thesis. Furthermore, one or two of their statements are patently incorrect, reflecting a poor understanding of genetics. This does tend to undermine one's confidence in the book. Altogether a very superficial attempt which ends up trivialising an important topic. Yes it's quite good fun and easy to read but don't waste your time reading past the third chapter. Oh yes, and they publish it themselves which speaks volumes. Didn't notice that before I bought it.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By John Peter O'connor VINE VOICE on 11 April 2000
Format: Paperback
The authors start from two straightforward premises:
Men and women are very different in the way that they act, react, think and feel.
These differences are the inevitable consequence of our biology.
The first of these is a lot less controversial than the second and, perhaps the book would have ruffled fewer feathers if the authors had stuck to the first premise. However, the caveman-cavewoman analogies do help them to illustrate their points.
The book is well put together in a pretty light-hearted style. While not being unputdownable, it is an easy read. One quibble though has to be that, after a while, many of the jokes seem to be a little tedious.
As well as illustrating the differences between men and women, the book gives examples of how these lead to conflict and misunderstandings. Their advice is pretty much to learn about the differences and grin and bear it.
Of course, the book goes over much the same ground as the Mars-Venus stuff but, it does so at a somewhat simpler and, some would say, superficial level. If you get to the end of Mars-Venus and absorb what it says then this book is not for you. On the other hand, If you found M-V to be too heavy and a bit pretentious then the lighthearted and more direct style of this book could be just what you need.
At the end of the book, there is a substantial list of references and further reading. This varies from other popular psychology books to research papers which provide the scientific backing for the authors ideas. Unfortunately, they just list these with no comment and no attempt to categorise the items. This means that the list is of little use to a reader interested in exploring further topics or referring to some of the research on which the authors ideas depend.
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