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Don't Cry, Tai Lake (Inspector Chen Novels) Hardcover – 8 May 2012

8 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 262 pages
  • Publisher: Minotaur Books (8 May 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312550642
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312550646
  • Product Dimensions: 16.4 x 2.8 x 24.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 598,698 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Qiu Xiaolong was born in Shanghai. The Cultural Revolution began in his last year of elementary school, and out of school, out of job, he studied English by himself in a local park.

In 1977, he began his studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai, and then the Chinese Academy of Social Science in Beijing. After graduation, he worked at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences as an associate research professor, published poems, translations and criticisms, and became a member of the Chinese Writers' Association.

In 1988, he came to Washington University in St. Louis, U.S. as a Ford foundation fellow to do a project on Eliot, but after the Tiananmen tragedy of 1989, he decided to stay on and write in English instead. He then obtained a Ph.D. in comparative literature at Washington University and taught there.

Having won several awards for his poetry in English, he moved on to write a novel about contemporary Chinese society in transition, which developed into the critically acclaimed, award-winning Inspector Chen series - Death of a Red Heroine, A Loyal Character Dancer, When Red is Black, A Case of Two Cities, Red Mandarin Dress and, soon to be published, The Mao Case. The series has been translated into sixteen languages. In addition, Qiu Xiaolong has published a poetry collection, several poetry translations, and a collection of linked stories (also serialized in Le Monde). He lives in St. Louis with his wife and daughter.

Product Description

Review

Xiaolong's astute rendering of the many contradictions of contemporary Chinese life centres on the brilliant Inspector Chen . . . A series that might well get you hooked. (Sunday Telegraph)

Atmospheric and rich in behind the scenes detail . . . Morse of the Far East. (Independent)

Chen is a great creation, an honourable man in a world full of deception and treachery. (Guardian)

With strong and subtle characterisation, Qiu Xiaolong draws us into a fascinating world where the greatest mystery revealed is the mystery of present-day China itself. (John Harvey)

The first police whodunnit written by a Chinese author in English and set in contemporary China . . . its quality matches its novelty. (The Times)

The usual enjoyable mix of murder, poetry and contradictions of contemporary Chinese culture. Chen is a splendid creation. (Independent on Sunday)

A vivid portrait of modern Chinese society . . . full of the sights, sounds and smells of Shanghai . . . A work of real distinction. (Wall Street Journal)

Qiu Xiaolong is one of the brightest stars in the firmament of modern literary crime fiction. His Inspector Chen mysteries dazzle as they entertain, combining crime with Chinese philosophy, poetry and food, Triad gangsters and corrupt officials. (Canberra Times, Australia)

Gripping . . . Chen stands in a class with Martin Cruz Smith's Russian investigator, Arkady Renko, and P.D. James's Scotland Yard inspector, Adam Dalgliesh. (Publishers Weekly)

Wonderful. (Washington Post) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

In the seventh novel in this acclaimed Chinese crime series, Inspector Chen's holiday is interrupted by murder and a case that shows the true cost of his country's drive towards prosperity. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By L. J. Roberts TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 6 July 2012
Format: Hardcover
First Sentence: Chief Inspector Chen Cao of the Shanghai Police Bureau found himself standing in front of the gate to the Wuxi Cadre Recreation Center.

Chief Inspector Chen Cao is surprised, pleased and a bit suspicious when he is given an unexpected vacation at a resort reserved for only those of high cadre; influence and/or power. The exclusive resort is located on the once very beautiful and pristine Tai Lake but chemical dumping and greed for wealth are changing that. One of the executives is murdered and a young woman Chen has come to know is being blamed. It is up to Chen to find the truth before she, or her friend, are taken off to prison.

With a tranquil beginning, we are immediately brought into a different world where we learn the importance of rank. Qui excels establishing a strong sense of place. From him we see, hear, smell and taste China. There are wonderful descriptions of the food, which are enhanced by stories of the history behind some of the dishes reminding us just how old is the culture of China.

Chen is fascinating and wonderful character. He's a policeman who had no desire to be a policeman. He's a poet and translator of books, particularly mysteries, from English into Chinese. But he is also dedicated to do his job the best he can, realizing its importance. It's enjoyable to see the local policeman, Sergeant Haung, admiration of Chen and his comparisons of Chen to Sherlock Holmes. Chen is a man of integrity. Although he is attracted to a female character, he knows he must not violate his responsibility as a cop. Poetry and quotation have a significant place in the story. Even the love scene is lyrically described.

We learn details of its history and customs; from the "hair" salons to environmental issues of today.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Retroman on 24 May 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I always look forward to the next Chen novel and so approached this one with eager anticipation as to which aspect of China's "third way" would the author take on.

This time it's the effect on the population and the impact on the environment of Chinas rapid push for economic growth when married up with personal greed flowing from the move towards privatisation of state industries. And always arching over this is the impact on The Party.

The novel follows the usual structure of previous Chen novels but like "A Case Of Two Cities" Chen is not operating on his home turf and with his usual cast of characters and I think this novel like "Two Cities" suffers from that relocation.Yes it has the usual mix of poetry, the possible love interest, the political interplay, some occasional references to food and drink but the pace is a little slow.

Nevertheless I enjoyed it and would certainly recommend it to fans of this series but newcomers should as always start with the first in the series. I would be concerned that a newcomer reading this might be put off and that would be a shame as these Chen novels are really very good. .
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr P F Barker on 14 May 2014
Format: Paperback
Yes, great book. A fine mix of intrigue, corruption, poetry and some green issues as well as the descriptions of food, which are always entertaining and informative.
Very good and quick service from the seller
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By allenr on 7 Jan. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is good to have another volume in the Inspector Chen series, even if this is not the best of the bunch.
Still, very readable for fans, and the pollution angle is scary and, one assumes, all too accurate.
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