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Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Five Star Paperback) Paperback – 10 Jun 1999

6 customer reviews

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Frequently Bought Together

Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Five Star Paperback) + Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon + The Violent Land (Penguin Classics)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Serpent's Tail; New Ed edition (10 Jun. 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1852427108
  • ISBN-13: 978-1852427108
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 3.5 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 124,180 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

A delightful read (Financial Times)

A master storyteller (TLS)

Not only has Amado brought to life the whole teeming city of Bahia where the story is set, but he has so filled it with musky perfume of physical love that it almost saturates the senses (Cincinnati Enquirer)

About the Author

Jorge Amado was born in northeastern Brazil in 1912. His early masterpiece is The Violent Land. A political exile in the 1940s, he lived for many years in Prague and Paris. The success of Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands brought Jorge Amado an international audience and translation into forty-six languages with more than 8,000,000 copies of his books in print. The War of the Saints, his latest book, confirms his stature as Latin America's greatest storyteller. Jorge Amado died in 2001.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 Nov. 1999
Format: Paperback
I started reading this book with an amount of trepidation as I had been told it was difficult to get past the first few chapters. However, from the first page, I was gripped and really loved it. I developed a real fondness for Flor and her gentle, stoic character, and even ended up with a real soft spot for her rogue of a first husband. The story is well told so that you really feel like you know the characters and the way of life in Bahia. I had just finished a "The War of Don Emmanuel's Nether Parts" by L de Bernieres which is similar in its conjuring up of the south american way of life and the way that the supernatural is intertwined with the real world. I think this helped me to get to grips with the book and follow the sometimes complicated plot moving in and out of reality. Parts of it are positively surreal which all added to the pleasure and amusement I got from reading the book. I laughed out loud at parts and ended the book with a broad and contented smile on my face. This really is a lovely, warming love story - I look forward to reading more of Amado's work.
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 Dec. 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
My face is one big smile as I think what I could write here. Very very good. I read his Saints book a few years ago and liked it well enough to send to my best friend, but this book I want to send to all my girl friends, and some guy friends as well! This book put me in a good mood. Very witty and funny and, while it definitely has that latin american twist to it, really relates to people's race to get all good things in their life. Dona Flor wins, and the way she gets there makes for a very entertaining read.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dr R TOP 500 REVIEWER on 11 Nov. 2013
Format: Paperback
The Brazilian novelist Jorge Amado, 1912-2001, explains the dilemma at the centre of this book in its title, 'Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands'. Dona Flor's first husband, Vadinho dos Guimaraes has caused his wife equal measures of pain and passion before he dies unexpectedly during Carnival celebrations in 1940s Bahia, an Eastern state on the Atlantic coast. The novel, which runs to well over 500 pages, has been translated from the Portuguese by Harriet de Onís.

Vadinho was less than impressed on meeting Flor's mother, the monstrous Dona Rozilda, for the first time, `She was a scarecrow, how she must stink under her petticoat, reek of spoiled fish....A harpy, the skin and bones of dry, salt fish, useless for any lecherous act or thought'. If anything, she thinks even worse of him.

Flor, a spectacular cook who runs a school for Bahian cooks, finds it almost impossible to accept her loss and thinks back to their first meeting and their subsequent years together. Vadinho's gambling, unfaithfulness, duplicity and drinking were known to everyone. Whilst his friends bemoan the passing of a character with whom they passed the time drinking, gambling and visiting brothels, Flor's women friends, led by her mother, consider that she is much better off without her husband and encourage her to forget him and get on with her life.

Eventually, she marries again, Teodoro, the local pharmacist, who is the exact opposite to Vadinho, reliable, trustworthy and thinking about what he can do to make their life together better. The complication is that Vadinho returns from the dead to continue their life together and only his widow can see him. The book, therefore, draws on Brazilian culture and African mysticism.
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