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Domination and Lordship: Scotland, 1070-1230 (New Edinburgh History of Scotland) Paperback – 21 Feb 2011


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Product details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Edinburgh University Press (21 Feb. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0748614974
  • ISBN-13: 978-0748614974
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 3 x 15.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 201,532 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Richard Oram is Professor of Medieval and Environmental History and Director of the Centre for Environmental History at the University of Stirling --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By morrisonif on 24 May 2011
Format: Paperback
When I was young I thought that Scotland always existed. This book explains how Norse, Gaels, English and Normans all contributed to the long messy birth of a nation. Not sure why it ends at 1230 given that the English border was established in 1237 and there is a slight bias towards the lives of the nobility, skewed no doubt by the surviving documents but this is how I like my history, a dense academic text that is not a quick read but worth the effort. Enlivened by snippets like the self destructive hamlet of Eldbotle you get drawn into the medieval world. Battle and skirmish, marriage and treaty, church and clan, kings and lords, the author blends all this into a comprehensive, informative and enjoyable read.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By R Matthews on 17 Jan. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The previous reviews give a good overview of the book, so
I would just add the following:

1) The maps are useful but seem to have been added
as an afterthought - they are not referenced from the text
nor do they cover all the places mentioned.
(This comment also applies to Volumes 1 and 2 in the series).

2) Volume 2 in the series finishes with Mael Coluim son of Donnchad
king of Alba, while Volume 3 starts with Malcolm III king of Scotland.
It is the same person. A shame one or other book
does not include an explanation for this change in nomenclature.

These points aside, the book is very interesting and detailed.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By MLA VINE VOICE on 20 Sept. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Domination and Lordship by Richard Oram is the chronologically third book in the New Edinburgh History of Scotland series. It covers the period from marriage of Malcolm III to Margaret of Wessex through the reigns of his successors including Alexander I and David. The period concludes with the defeat of the rival lineage of MacWilliams that apparently cemented the Scottish royal line. Oram's work includes the traditional king-based narrative of battle and conquest, diplomacy and personality. This narrative is supplemented by discussions of the structures of authority in Scotland during the period, economic and cultural changes in urban and rural life, and a narrative on the development of the Scottish church.

The traditional king-based narrative takes up nearly the first half of the book. Oram paints a picture of the Scottish world as it existed in 1070 and the relationship Scotland had with the families to the south. The 1070 starting point is of significant interest coming just a couple of years after the Norman invasion of England. That Malcolm III made a point of marrying Margaret of Wessex so soon after the fall of Wessex from power in England is in itself fascinating. It is arguable that Margaret's arrival in Scotland is the catalyst for the cultural change that eventually led to the defeat of Gaeldom by English influences. Oram is clear that Margaret's role is key but does not call for her arrival as a defining feature of future Scottishness. He balances both sides of the argument and comes down firmly in the middle.

The most prominent monarch of the era was David I. David I's term of office is a period of expansion and success.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By TR on 8 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback
The book comprises two parts; a chronological account at the level of Kings, great Lords, Battles and Treaties, and then a series of essays on developments of parts of the polity. To one who has read a little about the period there were few surprises in the first section, which largely confirmed that David I was an effective ruler, and that his grandson, William, was misguided and somewhat feckless. However, there were too many questions left hanging; for example, how were successive kings able to spend so much time in northern England, and attending Angevin Kings in England and France, without losing control of most of Scotland, and how damaging was the pursuit of the Northumbrian earldom, even if it meant giving homage in some form, to these same Angevin Kings. I think also that the author's account of the intrusion of Norman, Flemish and English vassals into Scottish lordships presents a surprisingly benign picture, especially given the amount of unrest in Scotland in the 12th century; did things really differ so much from William the Conqueror's England in the 11th century? Some of the later chapters are excellent, but the whole is weakened by the author's determination to steer clear of numerical estimates of any kind. I accept that there are great uncertainties associated with the numbers, I have seen quoted, but surely it would have supplied context, to provide the author's best assessments of populations, of nations, towns, and monastic establishments, of the sizes of armies, of the wealth of new burghs, and the nation as a whole. The lack of the latter makes any discussion of the payment associated with the Quitclaim of Canterbury, and the even larger amount offered later by King William for recognition of his claim to Northumbria, rather specious.
Anyone coming fresh to this book will learn much, not least because of its accessible style, but I do not think that it quite lives up to my expectations from such an expert on the period.
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