Empire and Domestic Economy and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £153.00
  • You Save: £19.52 (13%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Lacey_Books
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: 2001 hardcover edition. Small inscription inside cover else a new, unread copy. The Upper Mantaro Archaeological Research Project, a multiyear program undertaken from the late 1970s through the mid-1980s, is a benchmark for a new level of quality in Andean archaeological research and has brought the theory and substance of research in the region to the attention of the larger archaeological community.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Empire and Domestic Economy (Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology) Hardcover – 30 Sep 2001


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£133.48
£94.38 £53.00

Trade In Promotion



Product details


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

From the reviews

"...has important theoretical implications for archaeological studies of empires, worldwide. Terence N. D'Altroy, Christine A. Hastorf, and their associates have helped move the Andes closer to the front lines of theory building in archaeology. Every chapter is rife with implications for the study of similar societies anywhere in the world, and each is a gem unto itself. Rarely have the archaeologically visible effects of imperial domination been so clearly documented. D'Altroy, Hastorf, and their associates most effectively have raised the bar for future studies of imperial-provincial relations. This book should reside in the library of every archaeologist with an interest in empires."
Journal of Anthropological Research, 58 (2002)

"...a tribute to the stamina and perseverance of both editors and contributors." (Norman Hammond, Antiquity)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
In 1532, when the Spanish conquistadores ascended the Peruvian Andes from coastal Tumbes, they entered a part of the world that seemed utterly foreign to them. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star


Feedback