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Domenico Scarlatti - Keyboard Sonatas

Domenico Scarlatti - Keyboard Sonatas

27 Feb 2001

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 27 Feb 2001
  • Release Date: 27 Feb 2001
  • Label: ANGEL RECORDS
  • Copyright: (C) 2001 Angel Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:07:06
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001IMCFDO

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
Great Scarlatti Playing 21 Sep 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I'll quickly dismiss the only reservation I have about this recording, and it is a small one indeed. The recordings here obviously come from two different sessions. While one of those sessions produced brilliant and airy sonics, especially in the new digital remastering, the other offers a drier sound picture, and the difference is fairly obvious. Still, there is so much to enjoy here, I don't wish to belabor the issue.
So then, down to the playing. Igor Kipnis was, for my money, the best harpichordist of his generation, and his playing hasn't been superseded by more recent artists. Here, his playing is wonderfully crisp and characterful in the faster sonatas such as the well-known Sonata in G, K. 337, and he catches Scarlatti's lyrical moods with equal success, infusing the gorgeous Sonata in C minor, K. 11, with genuine pathos. Then Kipnis has a truly virtuoso turn in the dramatic Sonata in D minor-major, K. 444.
Happily, the clavichord that Kipnis plays is ideally recorded, though the recording comes from way back in the 70s. (The clavichord seemed to offer special recording challenges throughout the stereo era. I remember the liner notes to one recording I owned in which the clavichordist said he had recorded his instrument in a well-isolated bathroom in order to catch its diminutive voice!) And the clavichord is the perfect medium for the three sonatas K. 87, K. 322, and K. 323.
All in all, then, just about the ideal Scarlatti collection, at a very nice price.
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Kipnis stands out from the crowd 4 April 2005
By Eloi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Kipnis belongs to the "Lost Generation" of revival harpsichordists along with Valenti, Hamilton, Sgrizzi, Puyana and others. They were all keen to continue the harpsichord revival of Landowska and Kirkpatrick in sometimes oddly-miked performances on their revival-style instruments with all the bells and whistles--foot-couplers, "lute" stops, and the like. Their recordings are hard to find nowadays, because they failed the authenticity test.

OK, let the historians duke it out over whether there was ever a Spanish harpsichord with the 16' stop that Kipnis uses sparingly on this recording. What you get here are performances that exploit rhythm and phrasing much more than the idiosyncrasies of the revival harpsichord. Take K 322, for instance: I had always thought of this as a transcribed dance track, and that's what you hear in performances by Horowitz, Lewin, Szokelay et al. But Kipnis, who plays this work on the clavichord, has a different idea, much freer. Another clavichord gem (of 3) is K 87.

One of the most obvious ways Kipnis stands out from even the rest of the revival players is his eagerness to decorate the repeats in what he thought was authentic practice of the 18th century. Was it really so? Heck, we'll never know, but his repeats go beyond a few added ornaments to substantial additions. He regularly fills in intervals with scale passages, and he generally is consistent in style, so there's a kind of thematic unity to his ornamentation for any given piece. Sometimes I like it (K 444 is great), sometimes not (K 146). But it is always within the rhythmic framework. If you want to add an entirely new take on your Scarlatti experience, I recommend this well-recorded bargain.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
KIPNIS BADLY MISFIRES 30 April 2008
By John J. Schauer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I have long been an ardent admirer of Igor Kipnis's harpsichord playing--his version of Bach's Goldberg Variations, for instance, is one of the all-time great harpsichord recordings--but not here. For some strange reason, he seems to have suddenly adopted a lurch-and-stagger rhythmic treatment he doesn't exhibit in his other recordings and that keeps you constantly off-balance. I know Baroque music used to be unfairly branded as "sewing-machine" music, and I'm not advocating vise-like and unyielding performances that are mechanical or metronomic. But a lot of Baroque music--indeed, one could fairly say virtually all music--has its roots, however distant, in dance, and I defy anyone to dance to these interpretations. It cannot be only in the last century that people learned to enjoy a relatively steady rhythm they could easily follow, and which often greatly augments the energy and excitement of the music. Rhythmic inflection and subtle nuance are one thing, but Scarlatti's sonatas, in Kipnis's hands, become so many little snippets sort of stitched together. It sounds as if Kipnis is trying way too hard to be individualistic in his interpretations, which become highly annoying, if not unlistenable, after a short while. If you want to hear Scarlatti sonatas come to life, try Scott Ross's incomparable performances.
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Fabulous! 17 Mar 2007
By Brian K. Musgrave - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Truly a "must-have" item for Boroque music lovers...What Bach was for the fugues, Scarlatti was to the Sonatas...great item, professionally shipped and transaction was smooth and with expedience..would highly recommend seller...Thank you !
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