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Dog Man Star (Remastered)
 
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Dog Man Star (Remastered)

6 Jun 2011 | Format: MP3

£3.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £7.35 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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2:37
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4:20
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3:22
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4:50
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5:22
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4:31
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4:37
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3:50
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3:48
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9:25
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5:29
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7:26
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4:20

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 6 Jun 2011
  • Label: Edsel
  • Copyright: (c) 2011 Demon Music Group Ltd
  • Total Length: 1:09:42
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B004ZLUMT4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,144 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Mr. A. Miles on 27 April 2004
Format: Audio CD
One can only wonder what Suede would have go on to achieve if Anderson andButler had not fallen out. The debut and this spectral masterpiece of analbum could easily stand up to any bands first two albums ever, TheBeatles and The Smiths included. Dog Man Star is very much a winter album.Lyrically it is a very paranoid, reclusive piece. It is alleged that Brettlocked himself in his flat in the middle of nowhere with a mountain ofL.S.D. to write it. Bernard's guitar work is incredibly atmospheric anddense, particularly on the near-ten minute Asphalt World the final cut ofwhich upset him due to it's severe edit! God knows what the demos musthave sounded like. By a mile suede's finest album, it is an undeniablyEnglish work, Syd Barrett, Julian Cope, Kate Bush, and yes, Bowie and theSmiths are all in there somewhere. There are a few up beat glam-stompers,New Generation being the best up-beat number, but most of the set isdrug-addled and claustrophobic. Daddy's Speeding is the oddest track, afeedback entrenched eno-style piece about James Dean that eventuallycollapses under it's own weight. The opener Introducing the Band couldalmost be off Piper At The Gates Of Dawn and Heroine surely IS a DavidBowie song. The reason Dog Man Star is such a work of genius though, isthe last four tracks. Roughly 25 minutes of music that is so enormous thatif Brett and Bernard had stayed together, they would have probably landedon the moon. The 2 Of Us is a dark, sparse romantic ballad written about apossibly imaginary lover, Black or Blue is another drug track which couldbe out of a particularly creepy West End musical, The Asphalt World iscolossal and features Butler's best ever guitar work and closer Still Lifeis the last track because it simply can't be followed, so vast andglorious is the orchestral outro.Read more ›
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Philippa Christmass on 28 July 2003
Format: Audio CD
I agree with the other review - Dog Man Star requires a few listens, but it will grow on you until you recognise it for what it is - a masterpiece, one of the greatest albums of the 1990s.
No other "Britpop band", if you can call Suede that, were making
music this ambitious, emotionally dramatic or powerful in 1994.
Brett Anderson is one of music's most remarkable vocalists - if you're in any doubt, take one listen to the album's closing track,"Still Life", one of the most climactic pieces of music I've ever heard. Put this song on and play it LOUD...This album is not for people who prefer lightweight, unchallenging pop. It contains some lush orchestral
arrangements, ambient Bowie-ish strangeness in "Daddy's Speeding", the lush romanticism of "The Wild Ones" and the jump-up-and-down anthem "New Generation". This is one of my two favourite albums of all time. The other is the first Suede album!
Suede have been criminally underrated in comparison with bands like Blur and Oasis. But in the early days of Britpop at least, Suede ran rings around these two bands, producing two albums of breathtaking beauty.
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31 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Matt on 29 Jan 2006
Format: Audio CD
...and Johnny Marr pops around for a spot of tea.By the sounds of things they weren't just drinking tea...
Dog Man Star is truly sensational. When one compares this effort to what immediately preceded and proceeded it (in Britain at least), nothing else compares with the over-produced, orchestral bombast (notably on Still Life), the claustraphobic intensity (The Two of Us), and brooding menace(Asphalt World) which it exudes. A tip: listen to the latter track whilst driving around a hole of a town, perhaps Weston Super Mare, very late at night. You might have to lock the doors and windows of your car and/or not stop at traffic lights, but it is worth it in order to soak up the seedy atmosphere of low-rent, burnt-out, drug-frazzled 'glam'. It works best if your car is a shitty old Ford (either an Escort or a Probe for apt comedy value).
The Asphalt World aside, the rest of the album, as another reviewer mentioned, is best heard through headphones on a Discman turned up to a level not entirely healthy for one's ears. Even if you do go deaf as a result, chances are there's nothing much worth listening to after having sat through Suede's sophomore set.
While it would be thoroughly misleading to say that the album is one of light and shade (it is unrelentingly bleak), it is characterised by a variety of different styles. Unlike, say, Coldplay, who have two modes (1.bland, and 2.paint-dryingingly, fist-eatingingly, nondescript vapidity), Suede run the gamut from up-tempo glam-rocking in New Generation, through fuzz-guitar-enhanced Smithsian janglepop (Heroine), ending up with the overblown chamber music of Still Life.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Jason Parkes #1 HALL OF FAME on 10 Nov 2003
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Suede, from debut single The Drowners (1992) to this album (1994) were as great, sometimes better, than the mass of orgasmic music criticism that greeted them. The fade of quality evident on the albums that followed, & the hollow allure of addiction, put paid to the band here- I have felt this album is bombastic, OTT and turgid- but that's better than anodyne and mediocre. & these qualities can be quite wonderful...Dog Man Star makes sense in the climes of Autumn/Winter & despite the personal relations between Anderson/Butler (who lasted not quite as long as Morrissey/Marr), the obligatory chemicals etc- creatively this is Suede's peak. Where early songs didn't quite meet the hype (Dolly, Movin, Animal Lover)- here they moved into another realm...
Like Berlin, Music for a New Society, or Tilt, it's typically downbeat, OTT and vast- over-produced, but in a good way. Suede's debut was a bit of a disappointment- partly cos five of the songs had been released prior to the debut- but songs like Breakdown, The Next Life & Sleeping Pills lead this way. As did the ridiculously epic single Stay Together- which saw Bernard Butler go into Spectoresque overdrive (this sounds good when compared to Oasis' epic take on Neil Innes How Sweet to Be an Idiot aka Whatever). Alongside brass, strings, and woodwind, there feature singing children, acoustic guitars, sampled voices, weird drones, hails of feedback...this is one to play very loud to appreciate its vast cinematic aspirations...
New Generation and This Hollywood Life are about the closest to Suede of old, their sound (Bowie collides with Smiths) was much more advanced here- see the likes of Heroine (I'm sure it's about drugs really!), We Are the Pigs & The Power- which have the kind of arrangements that Radiohead began to use in their music!
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