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Dodger Audio Download – Unabridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 637 customer reviews

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By BR on 15 Dec. 2012
Format: Hardcover
I have read most of Terry Pratchett's books and the one constant throughout them has been the fantastic characterisation and humour within these books. I have always preferred the Discworld books due to the fact that the characters grow throughout the series. If you are already a Discworld fan and are thinking of buying this book, then I would absolutely recommend it. Yes, it is not a Discworld book, but the characters are so well portrayed and the situations that occur are so well described, then it may as well be a Discworld book, but without the Discworld! If you are new to Pratchett then I would also recommend this book as a good way of seeing what he is capable of. If you enjoy a well-written story with humour, then this should be a definite purchase.
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By J. Turner VINE VOICE on 13 Sept. 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I got this downloaded to my Kindle at the crack of dawn this morning - and I have just finished it. What can I say? After the rather difficult novel that was 'long earth', Mr P is back on form with this mildly Dickensian (okay, a lot Dickensian!) tale of Dodger, a young sewer 'tosher'. In the best tradition of unlikely heroes everywhere, our lad stumbles on the vicious attck of a young girl, thus plunging headlong into a dark mystery. I'm not going to give away the plot, except to say, that it is pure Pratchett, with twists and turns everywhere, starkly witty social observations and characters that Dickens would wish he had invented. Laugh out loud funny, poignant and waspish, this is a strong contender for my favourite book of the year. My only complaint is that five out of five is not enough. Who knew that sewers could be so interesting?! Recommended!
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Format: Hardcover
A book that manages to hit that very difficult objective of being an adventure story, with a proper hero,suitable for both children and adults. If I had a five-year-old I would be happy to read it to him or her, but as someone almost as old as Sir Terry, I enjoyed it too.

A sequel must surely be a possibility.
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By Kevin Trebell TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 15 Nov. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Dodger is something different from Terry Pratchett. Not a fantasy novel or a Diskworld book but a fictional story of a loveable street Urchin set in an alternative Victorian London.

I read this book in a couple of days and couldn't put it down. It was very much a Pratchett book in a Dickensian world filled with a mixture of the kind of curios that Pratchett produces and some very Dickensian old characters laced with famous characters from history thrown into a foggy murky melting pot of Victorian Intrigue.

This has been one of my highlights of this year and a real surprise. Loved it.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have been reading Terry Pratchett's books since the early years of Discworld and had been hoping for something special here. One of my favourite Pratchett books is Good Omens and I imagined that this step away from Discworld would also allow him to spread his wings, freed from the constraints of that series. All I can say is that I was disappointed, The book has no sparkle whatsoever and I had to force myself to keep sticking with it because I always finish books. I don't imagine I will read it again - sorry Terry...
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The introduction of Paul Kidby's illustrations highlighted something which I had not noticed before and that is the gradual "victorianising" of both Discworld and of Sir Terry's other books. I first noticed this in Monstrous Regiment with the cover illustration and the textual description of the uniforms especially devised for woman soldiers (bustles and all). I next saw this in Going Postal where Miss Crippslock's costume is straight out of a late Victorian fashion plate. This is something which Paul Kidby has picked up and reflected in his illustrations to the later books and "The Art of Discworld". "Nation" is set in a world which is close to but not exactly mid 19th century and with "Dodger" we go straight into the real thing - or as real as it can be for someone writing in the 21st century. OK so its not a grimy as it could have been (but its pretty close), Sir Josphe Bazalgette isn't the hero - although I don't agree that he was made to seem ineffectual or weak as someone has claimed elsewhere in these reviews. Its a great story, it reads well and it rattles along at a good pace with a few chuckles and the occasional laugh as you go. The plot is a bit too neatly tied up for my liking - hence the four stars - but its as good as a good discworld and maybe a little better than most.
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Format: Hardcover
Similar in style to Nation, this book sets out an alternative history of Victorian England, following the exploits of a young tosher who lives by his wits in the slums of London. A chance encounter with a young girl in distress and two emminent gentlemen (one of whom is Charlie Dickens) sends him on a giddy circuit around the gentry, parliament and down into the sewers and morgues of London.The book is marketed towards children, but I'm not entirely sure the age range it's targetted at. The romance, along with murder, miscarriage and violence, would suggest young adults more than children. I'm not sure how many parents will suddenly falter as they read this to their little cherubs at bedtime.

The book has little of Terry Pratchett's trademark humour, though there is some comedy of errors in Dodger's floundering in the unfamiliar world of high society. The story is told through Dodger's eyes, and so I suppose living on the edge of society leaves little time for laugh-out-loud moments, but I would have preferred more.

I was also uncomfortable with how Dodger met just about every leading figure from that time in the space of a few days, from Babbage and Mayhew through Robert Peel and even to Victoria and Albert, all of whom accepted him as an equal on the say-so of the journalist Dickens. Sweeney Todd I can forgive, this being an alternative past, but Dodger achieving overnight fame for not one but two historic feats of bravery in as many days seemed too coincidental, as did his buying Robert Peel's cast-offs immediately before meeting the man himself.

There was a lot of Samual Vimes in Sir Robert Peel. Historically he was a politician, but in this book his politics are second place to his being a copper of the old school, with a nose for what was what on the streets.
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