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Doctor Who: The Tenth Planet [VHS]

William Hartnell , Michael Craze , Derek Martinus    Universal, suitable for all   VHS Tape
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (92 customer reviews)

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Doctor Who: The Tenth Planet [VHS] + Doctor Who: The War Machines [DVD]
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Product details

  • Actors: William Hartnell, Michael Craze, Anneke Wills, Robert Beatty, Dudley Jones
  • Directors: Derek Martinus
  • Producers: Innes Lloyd
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Classification: U
  • Studio: BBC Worldwide
  • Run Time: 94 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (92 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000XYKG5M
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 119,486 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Final adventure for the first incarnation of television's favourite time traveller. The Doctor (William Hartnell), Ben and Polly arrive at the South Pole Tracking station in 1986, just as a strange satellite enters Earth's orbit, affecting the latest space mission. The Doctor predicts that the new arrival is Mondas, Earth's long-lost twin planet, and is proved correct when the base is invaded by the Cybermen, the planet's ruthlessly logical and seemingly invulnerable inhabitants.


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
79 of 82 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "It's far from being all over" 11 Oct 2013
By Mr. D. K. Smith TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:DVD
The Tenth Planet is a key story in the history of Doctor Who. It marks the departure of the original Doctor, William Hartnell, introduces the Cybermen and it is the first "base under siege" story, which would prove to be a staple of the Troughton era, particularly during season 5.

Although they would go on to menace the Doctor right up to the present day, it appears that the Cybermen were created purely as a one-off menace. Visually, of course, they are totally different from their later appearances - with their human hands, cloth covered faces and sing-song voices. On the one hand they look ridiculous, but on the other they are chilling in a way that no other Cybermen would ever be.

Soon, the Cybermen would be just another monster, their only goals being conquest and power. But in The Tenth Planet they merely want to survive - and if that means draining all the energy from the Earth in order to replenish their own planet, Mondas, then that's what they'll do. To them, this is logical, particularly if they can take the humans back to their planet and convert them into Cybermen. Why would anyone object to a life free from pain and disease? Certainly the Cybermen can't think of a reason, but the Doctor and his friends can.

Although William Hartnell didn't want to leave the show, his failing health sadly meant that there wasn't really any alternative. Indeed, a bout of illness meant that he had to be written out of episode 3 at very short notice, a particular problem given Doctor Who's treadmill-like year long production schedule.

But whatever his health issues or his feelings on leaving the part he loved, Hartnell is never anything but totally professional and rock solid.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "The End of the Beginning" 18 Nov 2013
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
A very important story for obvious historical reasons; last Hartnell, 1st Cyberman story, the beginning of the Kit Pedler/Gerry Davis writing partnership & 1st regeneration. Is it a good debut for the Cybermen and a good finale for the Billster? To be honest; yes.. and no.
Pedler and Davis (both misspelled for an episode each in the opening credits)delivered a good script with a large flaw but many virtues. The tardis crew turn up at space tracking station at the South Pole (its icy wastes well created for studio and over 40 years ago) just before the appearance of a new planet from which the Cybermen arrive.
Davis the old school dramatist always believed the companions should get a lot to do and go off on their own away from the Doctor at significant moments in the story. This proved to be a virtue given Hartnell's health (absent for an episode) necessitating a rewrite. Polly gets to be the main moral voice of the story berating both Warhorse commander Cutler and the Cybermen as the occasion commands. Anneke Wills does all this brilliantly and really sells it.
Ben played by Michael Craze gets to work out how the Cybermen might be tackled and if you've never particularly noticed Craze's acting before then watch the excellent moment where he conveys disgust at having to kill a cyberman!
A great debut for the Cybermen are characterised here better than in any other story since. They are not belligerent do-badders but they just no longer have or understand emotion.
They are a lot more logical than in some appearances. They offer to save the humans from Earth's expected destruction by taking them back to their planet Mondas but are not going to force them.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nine out of ten planets can't be wrong 24 Oct 2013
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
One of those mythical adventures in the Who canon, 'The Tenth Planet' has two things going for it - the first appearance of the Cybermen and the original regeneration. The 'base under siege' plotline that would come to the fore during the Troughton and Pertwee eras debuts here and evokes a suitably claustrophobic atmosphere that the monochrome picture seems to intensify. The Cybermen themselves are uniquely creepy in this story, with their cloth faces, blacked-out eyes and disembodied 'telephone answer machine' speech patterns, less robotic than they quickly became and still possessing recognisably human qualities as though their transformation were still midway through the process.
The knowledge that this story was to be William Hartnell's swan-song hangs over events and it's hard for the viewer's attention to veer far from him, searching for signs of his impending end; some carefully-placed enigmatic lines and Hartnell's accidental absence from episode three due to genuine illness actually work in preparing the viewer for the story's climax. That we are denied this climax in full is naturally something of a disappointment, but thanks to 'Blue Peter' we do at least have the regeneration itself, and the animated episode four as well as the photographic reconstruction do a decent job in the absence of the real thing. Ben and Polly continue to impress as companions, with Hartnell's abrupt disappearance midway through the story providing them with extra dialogue and fleshing out their characters nicely, emphasising once again what a shame it is that more of their stories haven't survived.
Anyway, it's great for me to finally see this story after making do with photos all these years, and unless episode four turns up in Darkest Africa, this DVD is as good a package as we could hope for.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars My old body's wearing a bit thin......
William Hartnell's Swansong as Doctor Who and the introduction of The Cybermen, a true classic.

It's such a shame that the final episode is still missing but the BBC... Read more
Published 23 days ago by Mr. Scott Carrick
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
As Advertised.
Published 1 month ago by MICHAEL JONES
4.0 out of 5 stars The first of a regeneration
By the time the fourth season of Doctor Who came around, William Hartnell's health was really starting to effect him and eventually it was agreed upon by the BBC and Hartnell for... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Gatekeeper197
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Very good
Published 1 month ago by Philip cannings
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Fantastic
Published 1 month ago by Maurice Derrett
4.0 out of 5 stars For fans of the old series and new
The story which introduces Doctor Who's second most enduring villain and the concept of regeneration which has kept this show alive for over fifty years. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Phill upNorth
5.0 out of 5 stars First Regeneration
A truly great story. The first instance of regeneration. Again the animated sections are carried out with feeling and precision. A job well done.
Published 1 month ago by Joe Turner
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Enjoy all the dr who movies ;)
Published 2 months ago by Natalie Maris
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Great item
Published 2 months ago by Edward
4.0 out of 5 stars Good to have complete version
Great to have the final episode as an animation rather than the patchy telesnaps and subtitles of the old video release. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Annie
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