Doctor Who The Scream Of The Shalka and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£7.99
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Doctor Who The Scream Of... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Doctor Who The Scream Of The Shalka Paperback – 11 Apr 2013


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.99
£3.03 £3.32
£7.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Doctor Who  The Scream Of The Shalka + Doctor Who: Shadows Of Avalon
Price For Both: £15.98

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: BBC Books (11 April 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849906475
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849906470
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 1.6 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 905,749 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Alaran on 15 Nov. 2013
Format: Paperback
Coming from the same author who scripted the original animation this novelisation is pretty much as might be expected. It deviates very little in plot or content.

The storyline involves an alternative Ninth Doctor arriving on earth during an attempted invasion by a serpent like species named the Shalka, who appear to be imbued with multiple sonic abilities that are linked with their technology. The Shalka themselves are fairly good as an alien menace. They are very well thought out, detailed and imaginative. And there is certainly potential for them to be re-used.

However, much like the animated version, the Doctor is generally quite unlikeable, condescending and pretentious. He does improve as the story developments (often during his interactions with de-facto companion Alison) but he is till hard to warm to even by the close of the book.

Alison is very much companion material but without the life that Sophie Okonedo brought to the part she feels very generic. The relationship between Joe and her is given a little more depth in the novelisation after it was quite difficult to believe in during the animation. This helps to make the story feel a little more human.

There is also more time spent on the other areas of the world where the Shalka are attacking. In the Webcast these were usually just random shots that didn't always seem to make sense. In the book they come together much more as whole.

Unfortunately there is no more information provided about what the Master might be doing with the Doctor. It was a bit that never really made sense in the Webcast and still fails to make satisfactory sense in the novelisation.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An alternate official ninth Doctor, played by Richard E. Grant, was launched online and then almost immediately cancelled with the relaunch of the BBC series on the tellybox with Mr Ecclestone in he role. This is the novelisation of that animated adventure, and incredibly refreshing it is too. Most interesting is that writer Paul Cornell makes very similar decisions on how to relaunch the character as Russell Davies did for the television. Forget about regenerating the character, and have him turn up well settled in his new body? Check. Give him a dark secret, a tragedy we don't know about, to drive his initial development? Check. Give him a companion who will show him how to be himself again, and make her the (seemingly) most ordinary person possible? Check. It's both very familiar, and very new. The story itself is a traditional 'base under siege' scenario given a global climax, and is perhaps darker and more drastic than the television series would dare for some time. It's recognisably the best of Who though, and an intriguing alternate reality for an enduring character. One of the most entertaining bits of Who fiction I've read this anniversary year.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Walker on 16 Nov. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not bad, but not the best.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
"I am the Master, and you will...come to like me very much, once you get to know me... 20 Oct. 2013
By John Wirenius - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Paul Cornell's novelization of the one adventure of the only briefly canonical Ninth Doctor shines with all of his usual wit, and his skill at character drawing. He takes the opportunity to smooth away a few rough edges from the Web Cast script he wrote, and opens the curtain a little on the states of mind and heart of this strangely bitter and flippant Doctor, and his old enemy, the Master, now relegated to companion status, and with his fangs partially drawn.

Interestingly,though, much of the novel's new material puts more flesh on the bones of the people with whom the Doctor interacts--especially Alison and Joe, and Major Kennet, each of whom becomes the viewpoint character at key moments. In all, a fine enhancement to a worthy script, and a fascinating loo at the road not taken.
A Great AU Doctor Novel and Look at What Might Have Been... 1 April 2015
By ZadNostrom - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
When people ask me who my favorite Doctor is or which Doctor was my first, I always answer the Shalka Doctor. More often than not I am greeted with a blank stare, followed by a 'Huh?'. At least it gives me the chance to explain the story around this novelization of a webseries that treated us briefly to Richard E. Grant as the (at the time canonical) Ninth Doctor. Before the series even premiered on the BBC website the TV series was returning with a different Ninth Doctor, rendering the Shalka Doctor an AU (Alternate Universe) Doctor. Nothing against Christopher Eccleston (he's my second favorite Doctor) but this story was my introduction to the world of Doctor Who and as such will always have a special place in my heart. This novelization (by the great Paul Cornell) is great. It adds some depth to the story of the webseries by getting inside the head of the Doctor and co. and providing additional details to the story. It provides some classic Who moments with monsters that wouldn't have been out of place in the classic era of the show. Highly recommended!
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback