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"Doctor Who" and the Space War (Classic Novels) Audio CD – Audiobook, 4 Feb 2008

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Audio CD, Audiobook, 4 Feb 2008
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Product details

  • Audio CD: 4 pages
  • Publisher: BBC Audiobooks Ltd; Unabridged edition (4 Feb. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1405677961
  • ISBN-13: 978-1405677967
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 14 x 12.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 898,759 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Captain Pugwash on 10 Mar. 2009
Format: Audio CD
The Space War (AKA Frontier in Space) is a little gem from the latter days of Jon Pertwee's tenure as the eponymous Timelord and the last story to feature Roger Delgado as The Master, due to his being killed in a car crash in Turkey shortly after the story was filmed. The opening in particular is superb - it is the year 2540 and someone seems determined to provoke a war between the two most powerful empires in the cosmos: Earth and Draconia. Arriving on board an Earth Spaceship, The Doctor and Jo are caught-up in these machinations, but see that the invading Draconians are really Ogrons - previously seen as brutal henchman of The Daleks. Someone is manipulating soundwaves to make people see what is not really there, in order to force the two governments into conflict and mutual destruction.
The action switches between the ship, Earth and a penal colony on the moon; The Doctor ends up there after the warmongering Earth General, Williams, convinces The President that the Timelord is behind the attacks.
The lizard-like Draconians are a great addition to Doctor Who's canon of alien threats - they are essentially peaceful but once provoked make formidable adversaries. The Ogrons come across beter on audio as you can't see their ape/clown looks, and their former masters even make a brief appearance towards the end...Overall it is a solid slab of 70s Doctor Who; the narration by second TV 'Master' Geoffrey Beevers is well-suited to the story and Malcolm Hulke's writing retains its power.
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By Alaran on 10 Feb. 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There is quite a bit going on in this story, perhaps sometimes too much as events skip from planet to planet and spaceship to spaceship without providing much detail or atmosphere concerning the locations. Draconia is represented by only one room and the planet of the Orgons, although we see more of it, doesn’t even get a name. The plot also gets a little chaotic at times during the televised serial. In comparison the novelisation is a touch lack lustre, lacking the vitality of the programme.

Originally this story was known as ‘Frontier in Space’. Admittedly this wasn’t the most gripping of titles but ‘The Space War’ is even duller. If you’re going to go to the effort of re-naming it surely something a bit better could have been thought of. It’s utterly bland and doesn’t really reflect the story.

Disappointingly the novelisation contains no extra information on or depth into Draconian culture and civilisation. In ‘The Cave Monsters’ Hulke’s efforts at broadening and expanding the Silurians was some of the best work in the Target novelisations. The Draconians don’t receive the same treatment. This is a great shame as they are an intriguing species. Why they have never been re-used in the programme is also a bit of a mystery.
There isn’t much more provided on the Ogrons either. However, the best improvement made by the novelisation is with the creature native to their world that they fear and worship. In the novelisation it is a monstrous dinosaur type beast whereas the television offered what could only really be described as a ‘blob’.

The book makes a few subtle improvements such as the past relationship between the Earth President and General Williams being emphasised a little bit more. But other changes lessen the story.
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By Mr. D. K. Smith TOP 500 REVIEWER on 16 Feb. 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The Space War (or as televised, Frontier In Space) can be listened back-to-back with Planet of the Daleks as there's a link between the two stories. But either story stands up perfectly well by itself - and for my money The Space War is the better of the two.

A large part of the story does consist of the Doctor and Jo getting captured, escaping and getting captured again - but the arrival of the Master in the second half does buck things up. And the return of the Ogrons and the introduction of the Draconians are several more plus points.

As ever with Malcolm Hulke's novelisations, he added various small touches which made it sufficiently different from the television original so that it's an interesting listen in its own right. And it's read very well by Geoffrey Beevers (husband of the late Caroline John).

Whilst it's not the best Malcolm Hulke Doctor Who audio available (The Dinosaur Invasion would take that honour) nevertheless The Space War is a well written and performed audiobook.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When watching Frontier in Space on which this book is based, I would not imagine that the novelisation would be so good. Malcolm Hulke was a great weaver of tales and this book is no exception; The narration on this release is provided by Geoffrey Beevers whose voice hits just the right spot to keep you interested throughout without a break!

Highly Recommended
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful By D. Mason on 16 Aug. 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Malcolm Hulke was certainly one of the better Target writers, but sadly this is not his best story, amounting to little more than a preamble for the higher profile Planet of the Daleks by Terry Nation (novelised by Terrance Dicks). That said, Geoffrey Beavers is a great reader, and he seems to have made the best possible use of weak material (although it is arguably stronger than the televised version of the story). I would give Geoffrey Beavers reading Malcolm Hulke's Doctor Who and the Doomsday Weapon a full five stars. Yet I feel I am being over-generous awarding this release just three...
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