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Doctor Who - Series 4
 
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Doctor Who - Series 4

17 Nov 2008 | Format: MP3

£6.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £12.04 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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2:28
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1:13
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10:21
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2:45
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6:16
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1:07


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 17 Nov 2008
  • Label: Silva Screen Records
  • Copyright: (c) 2008 Silva Screen Records
  • Total Length: 1:16:27
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001MYNZP0
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 20,682 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Huntress on 3 Nov 2008
Format: Audio CD
Like Bear McCreary, Murray Gold is getting better and better. The score for the new doctor has an interesting history. In the first half of the first series it was mostly incidental music with very little original material, it got a bit better in the second half and from the interviews with Murray Gold from that era it becomes clear he thought that this was as epic as it would get but we know of course he was dead wrong. From series two on, Murray worked extensively with the BBC National Orchestra of Wales and its choir. The music now truly took off and sounded more like the score for some movie.The third series was less melodic and more experimental, yet it had some highlights. We have now reached the fourth series and with it we receive an intensely, harmonious and epic score that sweeps away with grand melodic structures that will take the breath away not only of Whovians but of any right minded music lover.

The score starts of course with the main theme of series four which is unfortunately maybe one of the few tracks I do not like. I really tried to get used to the new mix but I could never warm up to it. "A Noble Girl About Town " fits very well to the episode, since it was a light-hearted and slightly cheesy episode. "Life Among the Distant Stars " must also be from the first episode yet the tone is very different. It starts as a quiet, reflective piano piece with a tinge of sadness and yearning, that ends with a full orchestra. I am not sure when the track was used and in what context. I guess I have to watch the first episode again.

"Song of Captivity and Freedom" is the first time that the listener hears the "Song of Freedom" sung only by a single mezzo soprano. It gave me goosebumps. "UNIT Rocks" does exactly that and made me grin.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Doctor Who Online on 9 Nov 2008
Format: Audio CD
Doctor Who - Original Television Soundtrack - Series 4
Reviewed by: Doctor Who Online

With two Doctor Who soundtracks already under their belts, what can the latest offering hold in store from Murray Gold and Ben Foster for Series 4?

Last year we were treated to a compilation that was every bit as thought through as the Television series itself, with a broad mix of varied compositions that rounded off a superb accompaniment to the shows third season.

Owing to the success, the stakes have been raised, and output has once again hit new levels of audible satisfaction.

With Twenty-Seven tracks and a total running time of over 72 minutes, (not forgetting the two albums that have gone before it), you can't help but wonder what, if any, repetition might find its way veined throughout - as is concurrent with many other television soundtracks currently on the market. The answer is, thankfully, very little. There are of course some running themes such as `The Doctor's Theme', the Ood's `Song of Freedom' as well as River Song and her associated melody, but all have their place and evolve throughout.

As with the Series Three Soundtrack, there's a great selection of songs that particularly stand out.

Track Three; 'Life Among the Distant Stars', is Wilfred Mott's theme, and is a fine tribute to Bernard Cribbins' much-loved character. It starts with a subtle nod to the opening melody from 2001: A Space Odyssey, and intelligently comes into its own through piano, violin, flute and gentle brass. The final third of this track brings back that lump you got in your throat as Wilfred says goodbye to The Doctor at the end of the series.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. R. C. Thewlis on 7 April 2011
Format: Audio CD
Doctor Who Series 4 * * * * *
Music composed by Murray Gold
Silva Screen SILCD1275 (RT 76:40)

Opening with the revised main theme for Season 4, this new version employs a harder hitting shorter theme, coupled with a lovely electric guitar twang to finish the theme off with. From here, it's 2: A Noble Girl About Town and essentially Donna's theme. Gold expands on what we had before with a really toe tapping 7-note motif for the temp from Chiswick.

Full of boom and bass, 4: Corridors and Fire Escapes is an action track for the stairs sequence in Partners in Crime amongst other uses. In some ways it's almost Bond-like and very enjoyable.

6: Songs of Captivity and Freedom brings in the Ood story and some heartfelt singing from Mark Chambers. The accompaniment on strings is just beautiful and really lovely, encompassing the sad plight of the Ood perfectly.

Further tracks on 8: The Doctor's Daughter and 9: The Source bring re-uses of the Doctor's theme and also that guitar once again for the unveiling of the aforementioned daughter, Jenny. The later track encompasses some lovely sad string work, building for the horn led statement from the Doctor 'I Never Would'

10: The Unicorn and the Wasp brings in a chamber orchestra, perfectly setting this in murder mystery mode. Eerie, and with a small snatch from Miss Marple, it sounds completely different to a normal Who episode. I love Gold's playful use mid way through the track, then switched for echoed strings.

A real highlight comes in the next few tracks with 12: Voyage of the Damned Suite, the Christmas special from 2007. This is just Gold at his powerhouse best. Mixing the action beats with the song The Stowaway, it has some lovely sequences.
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