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  • Doctor Who - Kamelion Tales Box Set: The King's Demons / Planet of Fire [DVD]
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Doctor Who - Kamelion Tales Box Set: The King's Demons / Planet of Fire [DVD]


Price: £13.60 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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£13.60 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Frequently Bought Together

Doctor Who - Kamelion Tales Box Set: The King's Demons / Planet of Fire [DVD] + Doctor Who - The Black Guardian Trilogy: Mawdryn Undead / Terminus / Enlightenment [DVD] + Doctor Who - Frontios [DVD] [1984]
Price For All Three: £36.85

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Product details

  • Actors: Peter Davison, Mark Strickson, Gerald Flood, Janet Fielding, Nicola Bryant
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 3
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: 2entertain
  • DVD Release Date: 14 Jun. 2010
  • Run Time: 150 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B002SZQC6Q
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 8,054 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Two episodes of the classic sci-fi series featuring the Fifth Doctor, Peter Davison, and the shape-changing android Kamelion. In 'The King's Demons' (1983), the renegade Time Lord forces Kamelion (Gerald Flood) to pose as King John in 13th century England. 'Planet of Fire' (1983) sees the Doctor (Davison) and Turlough (Mark Strickson) arriving in Lanzarote on Earth to investigate the transmission of an unusual signal that turns out to be emanating from a mysterious alien artefact.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 22 Sept. 2010
Verified Purchase
...even if the BBC have padded their Kamelion Tales set out with another ill-advised abbreviated 'special edition' - in this case of Planet of Fire - that repeats all the mistakes they made with the special edition of Enlightenment: cutting far too much from the story, adding some not that good CGI effects and letterboxing the fullframe image to no good result. Still, at least the original cut is included, but it's hard not to feel that the two stories could have easily been included without the special edition at a much more reasonable price.

The stories themselves aren't that bad, however. The King's Demons, a rare two-parter, may be only have been intended to introduce proposed new companion Kamelion, a shape-shifting robot that was intended to be the new K-9, but it's a not bad little number that doesn't outstay its welcome. Following on directly from The Black Guardian trilogy, it sees the Doctor, Turlough and Tegan arriving on Earth in 1215 and interrupting a trial by combat watched by a gloating King John, who doesn't seem at all surprised to see his `Demons.' Naturally all is not what it seems and one of the Doctor's old enemies is lurking in disguise (not too difficult to penetrate despite the actor and make-up department's best efforts) to prevent the Magna Carta being signed and stop democracy in its tracks. It doesn't amount to much, but it's nice to see the Doctor back in an increasingly historical setting.

As for Kamelion... Well, things didn't work out too well for him at all thanks to the limited special effects technology of the day.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Alex Lyon on 17 Jun. 2013
King's Demons

The first episode is great, the second... Oh dear, no.

Gerald Flood is great as King John; it is a lovely big hearted performance and the royal personality - bombastic, cruel, capricious and domineering - fills Episode 1 'We sing in praise of total war', he sings to the lute. There don't seem to have been many lutes in England by 1215, but he's the king - maybe he has the only one.

But the political picture - I'm not so sure. I could buy the idea of the whole of English history hanging on Magna Carta (but not Magna Carta's global importance) but why is all this going on chez Fitzwilliam and not at Runnymede? Drama, Mr Dudley!

But politicking does carry the story for about 25 minutes, then Sir Gilles Estram is revealed as the Master (oh how clever, JNT, another anagram, yes and James Stoker is 'Master's Joke', we know...) and the intellectual capacity of the story plummets from there on.

The King, Gerald Flood's massive, florid King John, is a robot. Not just any robot, but a poor special effect that nowadays would look cheap alongside the dummies in Cyberdog in Camden. It looks like someone has painted a display mannequin silver and somehow - with kindness I hope - taught it to speak.

And the solution is easy - at the start of Episode 2, you pull his fuse out, lock the Master in the dungeons (or just hang him) and spend the remaining 20 minutes scoffing peaches and cider (cos Lord Ranulf got them in for the king, and they'll only go off now). History is safe, and when you wake up in the morning, you can nurse your hangover and disappear off to the Eye of Orion.

Don't, whatever you do, take that cybernetic twerp in the TARDIS with you - you'll only have to write him out again. Medieval misfits???
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Paul Tapner TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 July 2010
Verified Purchase
K9 as a popular Doctor Who character and he got the show a lot of publicity. So come the mid 80's the production team took the chance offered to them to have a real robot as a character on the show. A real robot! How could it possibly go wrong?

Well it did. A humanoid figure who can walk and talk and act human is something, as peter davison says on these dvds, that can't even be done nowadays. So it was an ever taller order in the early 1980's. Kamelion was introduced in two part story the King's Demons and then rather forgotten about because he didn't work as well as hoped. A scene due to feature in subsequent story the awakening was cut for timing reasons. But several stories later, the four parter planet of fire had to wrap up all the loose ends from the Davison era. Kamelion was one of them.

His two stories are presented here in one box set.

The King's demons sees the TARDIS crew arrive in medieval england only to find an old enemy is there, using Kamelion in order to stop magna carta being signed. Can the Doctor stop history being changed?

Despite the usual excellent bbc production values for a period piece, there's not much else to this story. It starts well but it peters out in part two. The master is only seemingly doing this for the sake of it. The number of companions in the story means Turlough is completely sidelined. And part two lacks action and suspense. It's not a terrible story but it's a bit inconsequential.

Planet of fire sees the TARDIS on lanzarote. And then on volcanic planet sarn. The mysteries of Turlough's past and his heritage are about to come into play and several lives are changed as a result.

Planet of fire had to: write out turlough. Introduce new companion Peri. Get rid of Kamelion.
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