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Doctor Who: Eater of Wasps Mass Market Paperback – 7 May 2001


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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: BBC Books; First Edition edition (7 May 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0563538325
  • ISBN-13: 978-0563538325
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 11.4 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 988,239 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 May 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The thing that struck me most about Trevor Baxendale's 'Eater Of Wasps' is that it is very unspectacular. I don't mean that it's a dull book, but Baxendale tells the story in such a solid, traditional way, that although it's an enjoyable book to read, it is a little unsatisfying.
The Doctor and his companions arrive in a sleepy 1930's English village, but the tranquil nature of the village is about to be destroyed by the presence of a piece of alien technology, and time commandos sent to recover the technology.
Baxendale characterises the Doctor well, adding a layer of darkness to the character which is shown through his unpredictability exhibited here. One major criticism of this book though is the fact that neither Fitz nor Anji seem to have particularly important roles in the story, and they seem to spend much of the novel running around pointlessly. Aside from this Baxendale exhibits a flair for the macabre with the chilling scenes involving the killer wasps, and shows how horror should be done in Doctor Who. The quality of Baxendale's writing is good, although in some of the scenes towards the end, he fails to create the tension and drama that he is intending to. The main problem with this book though, is that the plot, although interesting, is too straightforward - it hurtles towards it's conclusion far too easily.
Overall, 'Eater Of Wasps' is an enjoyable enough book, even if it remains somewhat unsatisfying.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Captain Pugwash on 2 May 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
*Should be five stars not three*

Superb entry in the Eighth Doctor series of novels; Trevor Baxendale stays true to the film's portrayal of a sensitive, eccentric but still brilliant incarnation of the Time Lord. Baxendale's dark and chilling horror story combines classic `Who' with a refreshingly macabre horror sensibility that never threatens to take the story over.

The prose flows and the novel remains engaging and accessible to the very end; much like the writer's efforts in the recent Tenth Doctor range of original adventures. The plot doesn't keep you guessing but still makes fascinating and `unputdownable' reading.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 May 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is one of the top books for a TV remake. Just reading it calls superb Sfx scenes to the mind which are counterpunched well with the 1930's Agatha Christie (Miss Marple) style village. A clever release date at the start of the wasp season helps as well.
Unfortunately the characters of Fitz and Anji are allowed to lag somewhat and seem reduced to back-drops or stereotypes occasionally(especially near the end) and after a long season of 'historic' type Doctor Who it would have been nice to have a future break.
That aside, the local characters were handled extremely well as was the Doctor. A really adorable book.
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