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Doctor Who: Dominion [Mass Market Paperback]

Nick Walters
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Book Description

10 May 1999 Doctor Who
The Tardis travels through a wormhole in space and time that leaves it nearly dead in a Swedish forest in the present day The Doctor reasons one end of the wormhole originates from there -- but where does it lead to?

The time travelers discover a massive military presence in the area. The wormhole is a result of strange experiments in teleport -- but the other end of the time space tunnel is rooted in a bizarre land not even located in our dimension -- the Dominion. And the Dominion itself isn't under threat from a shapeless, all-pervading blackness.



Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: BBC Books (10 May 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0563555742
  • ISBN-13: 978-0563555742
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 11.1 x 1.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 315,756 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Amazon Review

This is a fantastic novel. Nick Walters has taken all the elements which made Doctor Who great on television and has crafted a novel which rattles along at breakneck speed with some brilliant characters and some seriously well-realised alien settings and which also allows us insights into Fitz and Sam--and even the Doctor--along the way.

We open in Sweden with a great teaser. Then the questions: where have the people gone? What is taking great chunks out of houses and forest? Where are the apparently alien creatures coming from? We are introduced to Kerstin, a kind of Sam-replacement for the first half of the book and an excellent personality in her own right. This is necessary as Sam is enjoying adventures of her own in an alien environment which really had me hooked. Walters leaves none of the five senses unaffected in his ability to depict the alien place in which Sam finds herself. It's thought-provoking stuff: through all this action and adventure emerges a classic Doctor Who tale of scientists dabbling in things they shouldn't, people in danger, companions coming through and the Doctor managing to appear ever more vulnerable and human while just about maintaining the upper hand.

The contrast between the verdant forests of Sweden and the alien landscape of the T'hiili's world works especially well, and the characters are so well defined and described that you never lose track of who is meant to be who along the way.

The novel is spot on in characterisation and plot and there are no loose ends. The ending is particularly good and is likely to bring a lump to many readers' throats. It's a brilliant, brilliant novel and an excellent slice of what 90s Doctor Who is all about. More please. --David J Howe


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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb! 25 Jun 2000
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Wow! This is bar far the best Doctor Who book of the entire Eigth Doctor range, even beating Lawrence Miles Alien Bodies!
For someone who has never penned a Doctor Who novel before, Nick Walters begins startlingly well. The book is extremely easy to read without being simple, and I was drawn into the story within the first few pages.
I don't want to say too much about the content of this novel as I wouldn't want to give too much away - enough to say that you feel Walters understands the Eighth Doctor better than most other writers for the range. He writes him as a far more vunerable Doctor without compromising the character that we know and love from the TV series. This book could not have been written for any other Doctor other than the eighth, and serves as an example as to how future books of this range should be written. Even the blatent rip-off of Alien in one scene cannot persuade me to dock a star - this book had me feeling a way that no other book in this series has achieved - I laughed out loud on the train when reading the Doctor making piggie noises and welled up on reading the final page.
Someone commission this Nick Walters guy to write another novel - and soon!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good start 31 May 1999
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This is a bright beginning for Nick Walters. The TARDIS has landed in Sweden in 1999, near the epicentre of a wormhole which has already invaded the ship, taking Sam with it. But Sam is not the only missing person who has disappeared in mysterious circumstances. The Doctor and Fitz help the Swedish police, who puzzle over the equally strange appearance of alien bodies.
Who on Earth has created the wormhole? What has happened to Sam? These are the challenges facing the Doctor. However, with the absence of the TARDIS' telepathic circuits, the Doctor is incomplete, unprepared to face the reappearance of a familiar force... In creating the world of the Dominion, Nick Walters has certainly been creative, as this is one of the most fascinating arenas in any Doctor Who story. Despite such innovative elements, the novel does seem a bit too long, as it forces Walters to rely on a lot of clichés. At times, the plot is quite reminiscent of 'Terminus' and 'Alien', and he could have been a bit more original with the naming of the 'Dominion', and the way characters constantly change their minds is quite irritating. But Walters proves that he does have the scope to create powerful new worlds.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Enter the Dominion. 12 Mar 2008
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book is split into two sections. Any thing with the Doctor in is brilliant and anything in the Dominion is boring. Fortunatly we see more of the Doctor than we do the Dominion. From the dramatic and breathtaking first scene in the TARDIS to the Doctor hurridly setting course for San Fransisco, Nick Walters writing never falters. The Doctor justs jumps off the page with his boyish enthusiasm. Walters has nailed the character of the Doctor more than any other writer, and is clearly enjoying writng for the Eighth Doctor. I look forward to reading more from Walters.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Dominion 2 Jan 2014
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Dominion is Nick Walters' first solo foray into writing Doctor Who novels so he had very little pressure on him to write a decent novel, but nonetheless manages to pull off something rather good.

The story of Dominion is fairly complex, but Walters puts it across in very simple terms. Basically there is a wormhole between Earth and the Dominion and it's up to the Doctor to put it right. Sam gets stranded in the Dominion, and the TARDIS is severely damaged, meaning what should be simple to fix, turns out to be not so. After a solid start Dominion does seem to stall somewhat throughout the middle section and the ending isn't as clear cut as I'd have liked, but still fairly enjoyable.

Walters has seemed to struggle a little with the 8th Doctor's character, and uses the lack of the TARDIS to explain this away. This didn't aggravate me as much as it did some fans, but his indecisiveness was slightly irritating. Sam is separated from the Doctor and Fitz for the majority of the novel and trapped in the Dominion. Sadly her bits fall flat as the totally alien Dominion just isn't my cup of tea. Walters is very descriptive, trying to paint this place clearly in your mind's eye, but I just don't care for this sort of environment, let alone this sort of environment with someone as irritating as Sam. Fitz doesn't get as big a role as he did in the preceding novel but portrayal is very good and he again gets thrust into an environment he obviously isn't comfortable with, with yet another woman in tow. Fitz's humour of previous books seems a bit lacking, but this isn't a massive thing.

For a first attempt Dominion is a very good novel and Walters has set the bar very high for his next novel. It is by no means the greatest Doctor Who novel to date, but neither is it the worst.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars X-Files meets Doctor Who 5 Jun 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
Nick Walters makes a stunning debut in his first solo Doctor Who novel. With its dark, contemporary Earth setting and sinister, mysterious military figures, this is maybe the closest a Doctor Who story has felt to an X-Files tale. Separated from Sam and the TARDIS, the Doctor and Fitz have to rely on their wits alone as they try to uncover the truth behind the mysterious disappearances plaguing a small area in Sweden.
Between the previous book (Revolution Man) and this, Fitz has really come into his own as a character and a companion. This story nicely follows on from events in Revolution Man, while still being a strong story on its own, and leads nicely into the next book. This series is finally starting to feel like a series, rather than a collection of separate adventures, and I couldn't be more pleased.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Solid story, with a sudden ending 28 April 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Dominion was the kind of Dr. Who novel that begins off by throwing the reader straight into the action and proceeds to tell a good story, but is let down by it's ending which is sudden and expected. The characterisation of the Doctor feels a little too much like the 4th Doctor in places and not enough like the 8th that the series has developed. Although I think the main hero of this novel is Fitz, who possibly has his best story yet. It was also a pity that Krestin didn't join the TARDIS crew, as that would have led to some interesting future plot lines. The book that followed Paul Leonard's Revolution Man was always going to be a disapointment, but Dominion succeeds in being good, if not outstanding.
3.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable and a good debut novel 9 July 2001
By Andrew McCaffrey - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
There are a number of places in which DOMINION demonstrates the fact that this is Nick Walters' first solo novel. The narrative is a little unsure in areas, as if he isn't absolutely certain how to express his story properly. And yet in other portions, the prose seems almost effortless, as if he's swinging back and forth between doubt and confidence. Despite these problems, this is quite an enjoyable, if relatively simple, tale.
It's obvious that Walters has put a lot of thought into the characters and world he has created, and the results are well worth it. There are a few places where the characterization appears slightly off and a little unrealistic, but overall the effect is quite good. With the exception of a few UNIT soldiers, each person's motivations are carefully considered. Back-stories are worked into the narrative with meticulous detail making even soon-to-be-brutally-killed characters seem interesting. The plot is a little thin and there is an awful lot of diversionary material present. Fortunately, while the padding may be thick in places it's all padding of the highest quality.
As I mentioned there are a few new-author problems with the book. One of the more irritating aspects of the story was the "information dump" that kept cropping up. Upon encountering someone who had not been present for a sequence, a character would be quickly brought up to date with what was going on. This was usually handled in the clumsy, "X quickly told Y about their adventures while Y looked incredulous" manner that got a little irritating after the fourth or fifth repetition. There are better ways of structuring novels to avoid this sort of thing, and at these moments I was reminded of the old Target novelisations. Still, this is a just a minor concern and something that will surely disappear after Walters gains more experience as a writer.
As for the regulars, the characterization of the Doctor is something that I found to be something of a mystery here. He's much edgier here, bringing out the rougher, harsher aspects of Paul McGann's TVM portrayal, yet he stands by the wayside here and gets almost nothing done. On the companion side of things, Fitz gets most of the face-time and Sam is sidelined for the majority of the book; these two things are definitely a positive development.
All in all, this was a good read despite the minor quibbles that I mentioned here. Recommended.
3.0 out of 5 stars Good start 15 Dec 2000
By Mr. K. Mahoney - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This is a bright beginning for Nick Walters. The TARDIS has landed in Sweden in 1999, near the epicentre of a wormhole which has already invaded the ship, taking Sam with it. But Sam is not the only missing person who has disappeared in mysterious circumstances. The Doctor and Fitz help the Swedish police, who puzzle over the equally strange appearance of alien bodies.
Who on Earth has created the wormhole? What has happened to Sam? These are the challenges facing the Doctor. However, with the absence of the TARDIS' telepathic circuits, the Doctor is incomplete, unprepared to face the reappearance of a familiar force... In creating the world of the Dominion, Nick Walters has certainly been creative, as this is one of the most fascinating arenas in any Doctor Who story. Despite such innovative elements, the novel does seem a bit too long, as it forces Walters to rely on a lot of clichés. At times, the plot is quite reminiscent of 'Terminus' and 'Alien', and he could have been a bit more original with the naming of the 'Dominion', and the way characters constantly change their minds is quite irritating. But Walters proves that he does have the scope to create powerful new worlds.
3.0 out of 5 stars Solid story, with a sudden ending 28 April 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Dominion was the kind of Dr. Who novel that begins off by throwing the reader straight into the action and proceeds to tell a good story, but is let down by it's ending which is sudden and expected. The characterisation of the Doctor feels a little too much like the 4th Doctor in places and not enough like the 8th that the series has developed. Although I think the main hero of this novel is Fitz, who possibly has his best story yet. It was also a pity that Krestin didn't join the TARDIS crew, as that would have led to some interesting future plot lines. The book that followed Paul Leonard's Revolution Man was always going to be a disapointment, but Dominion succeeds in being good, if not outstanding.
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