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Doctor Who: The Burning Mass Market Paperback – 7 Aug 2000


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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: BBC Books (7 Aug. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0563538120
  • ISBN-13: 978-0563538127
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 11.4 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 121,628 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Justin Richards has written more books than he can remember. He has also written audio scripts, television, a stage play, edited anthologies of short stories, been a technical writer, and founded and edited a media journal.
Justin is the author of - amongst other things - The Death Collector, The Chaos Code, The Parliament of Blood and the series The Invisible Detective, Time Runners, and Agent Alfie. He is also Creative Director of the BBC's best-selling range of Doctor Who books, and has written a fair few of them himself.
His latest novel - The Skeleton Clock - is available for the Kindle.
Justin lives in Warwick with his wife and two children, and a lovely view of the castle.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By James C. on 24 Jan. 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
With his planet and his people gone, the Doctor, literally a man without a name, awakens on Earth at the turn of the 20th century in a carriage, amnesiac, with only a tiny blue box and a letter from a mysterious `Fitz' asking to meet him at St Louis on February 8th 2001 in his coat pocket.

`The Burning' by Doctor Who luminary Justin Richards was one of the first classic Doctor Who novels I read. Having read the graphic novel collections of Scott Gray's run on the Eighth Doctor in Doctor Who Magazine, and established a firm image and characterisation of one of the most complex and deeply passionate, humanised, incarnations of the Last of the Time Lords, I was wholly unprepared for diving into where it all began.

`The Burning' reinvents and reinterprets the Doctor Who mythos, heralding a new beginning in the Doctor's life, and readers alike. The Doctor here is a blank slate: a chance to be someone else, to be human for once. No longer does the Doctor have to `act' human, or project a human side, so as to not alienate the human companions that have taken up so much of his lifetimes, filling the long periods of loneliness in his long life. He can finally form human relationships, experience human love and loss, as is explored in the subsequent `Earth Arc' as it has become known. By cutting the cord to Gallifrey, and thus the weighted burden of his Time Lord responsibilities, the Doctor can finally adopt Earth as his home-from-home. He has become a blood-brother to the human race. He is a fallen angel seeking redemption for the sins of his tumultuous and tenebrous past. To quote show-runner Steven Moffat: "I think of the Doctor as an angel that aspires to be human".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 Oct. 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
After the over-the-top nature of the Faction Paradox arc, the Doctor Who books needed a little more grounding in reality and this is it. Not that this is a purely historical novel - the main plot concerns a fire monster - but it strikes a down-to-Earth (excuse the pun) mood, more gothic horror than insane sci-fi.
This is our first look at the "new" Doctor and my is it impressive. The writer's guidelines say that the Doctor should be viewed through the eyes of others to remain an engima, and this is one of the few times I've seen it work well. Without giving us a single look inside his head, Richards paints a picture of a very complex man; intelligent and incisive and compassionate, yet also rather detached. The ending - to give away nothing - is a powerful scene simply because it's the last thing you'd have expected the the "old" Doctor to do. I wouldn't have minded seeing more of this character.
Overall, this is a gripping book from start to finish, with great characters and a storyline that actually makes sense. (Although they never did explain the link between the TARDIS and the Burning.) Buy it. Read it. You won't be disappointed!
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Post-Interference series, late nineteenth century. Middletown has industrialised itself intoan unprofitable corner, leaving the land-owner, Lord Urton, floundering for options. When Roger Nepath offers him one, however strange, the town - and potentially the world - are put in danger. And only The Doctor, and the small blue-black box in his pocket, stand between Nepath and the end of the world.
As the first book of a new arc, The Burning is a reasonable enough beginning, steeped in mystery and mysticism. In hindsight, it reads like a Hammer horror film - and Peter Cushing's Doctor might have been better suited for the main role (if spiked with a little less grandfatherliness and more monster-mashing chutzpah), with Christopher Lee as Nepath. This is the sort of horror tale that sees people killed because they seem to lack the commonsense and balance to know when and how to run.
At times it feels sluggish, in that I felt the need to move on, peeking ahead through the pages to see what lay ahead. The Earthbound environment, following a lot of stories on aliens worlds, or in alien times, may be at fault for making me feel that way. However, the need to forge ahead and see what happens next seems to have had something to do with the engaging storyline and the loathsome characters - so, it comes recommended.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book starts off the "new" era in the EDA's- after the resolution of a great deal of plotlines in the last book "The Ancestor Cell". Justin Richards (the man now in charge of the BBC Dr. Who Book range) kicks things off, and there is definitely a new tone. The Doctor is a changed man; a little darker, more direct, definitely more focused. I love it! This is just the beginning of the "Caught on Earth" story arc (which spans "the Burning", "Casualties of War", "The Turing Test", "Endgame", "Father Time" and "Escape Velocity"). As of right now, only "The Burning" is out. I found the aspect of the Doctor's amnesia well handled and added a new dimension to the character. While the Doctor's character will be expounded upon over the course of the six books, this is indeed a promising start- highly recommended
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