Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle  Learn more Countdown to Prime Day Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars15
3.9 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

TOP 50 REVIEWERon 26 September 2014
In earlier Doctor Who stories, the Autons, and the Nestene Consciousness, have always exuded an aura of horror - how do you stop beings made of what appears to be plastic, and how do you stop a totally amoral conscious being who wants nothing other than control and your destruction? But the Doctor has always managed to halt their advances.

Now, the Tenth Doctor finds himself in a futuristic shopping mall complex - where an entire life experience is promised, not just shopping - and there appears to be an Auton presence. That much is fairly obvious, both from the cover of the book, and from the action pretty much right from the start. But does that same sense of awe and horror still pervade the story? Well ... no, not really. One dimensional characters, rather silly plotting, and the Doctor being more manic than usual do not a good story make. Pity, really - the Autons offer promise in their entire premise, but this book just does not live up to that premise.
22 comments|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 50 REVIEWERon 7 January 2012
In earlier Doctor Who stories, the Autons, and the Nestene Consciousness, have always exuded an aura of horror - how do you stop beings made of what appears to be plastic, and how do you stop a totally amoral conscious being who wants nothing other than control and your destruction? But the Doctor has always managed to halt their advances.

Now, the Tenth Doctor finds himself in a futuristic shopping mall complex - where an entire life experience is promised, not just shopping - and there appears to be an Auton presence. That much is fairly obvious, both from the cover of the book, and from the action pretty much right from the start. But does that same sense of awe and horror still pervade the story? Well ... no, not really. One dimensional characters, rather silly plotting, and the Doctor being more manic than usual do not a good story make. Pity, really - the Autons offer promise in their entire premise, but this book just does not live up to that premise.
11 comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 April 2016
Although it does it reasonably well, more or less this is what you would probably expect from a novel featuring Autons. Essentially this is because although they are a great concept for one story they don’t really have a great deal of scope as re-occurring monsters other than providing novelty ways to kill people involving plastic. The three onscreen stories that are about them (ie not ‘The Pandorica Opens’) all have fairly similar plot elements and ‘Autonomy’ is no different.
This does mean, however, that ‘Autonomy’ plays to the Auton’s strengths. Setting the story within an immense, semi-futuristic shopping centre/mall easily taps into the iconic images of plastic dummies smashing through department store windows. Trapping shoppers inside Hyperville also allows for a bit of a ‘base under siege’ scenario.Having the centre include hotels, spas and theme parks also provides the circumstances for a multitude of semi-amusing, plastic related deaths. Various Autons relentlessly pursuing victims through theme parks is also reminiscent of the film ‘Westworld’, which I’m sure was an inspiration for this novel.
There’s a reasonable range of people from different backgrounds, professions and ages; some of which are merely cannon fodder, bit others are there to make the reader wonder who might actually be an Auton. Guessing who is, however, isn’t that difficult.
As this is one of the Tenth Doctor novels where he has no companion travelling with him he ends up with assistance from a bit of an entourage that includes journalists, children and a popstar; all of which prove quite capable. Despite the jeopardous circumstances they all face it somehow makes for quite a light hearted romp as they are chased by plastic manikins, vampires, witches and devilish children. It gives the book a fun atmosphere.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 13 April 2014
A little slow to really get going but it did contain enough twists and character development to keep my son entertained throughout. Without giving any secrets away the evolutionary aspects of the Autons was novel and definitely enhanced the story. Some interesting story development was also in evidence. Overall this was a very interesting read.
11 comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 26 August 2011
Set in the near future, Hyperville is the mother and father of all shopping malls, an experience so vast with restaurants, bars, casinos, cinemas and theme parks that its hotels hold the shoppers who come to stay for a week or more to get the entire experience. But something terrible is lurking under the very lowest level of the complex and the Doctor once again fights the Nestene Consciousness, a contest we have seen many times before as the consciouness takes over plastic and taps into our fear of shop dummies. Good fun and thought provoking about the seeming human love for shopping malls, which are my personal idea of hell.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 June 2013
Really exciting book by Daniel Blythe. It features the tenth doctor, and the autons (quite possibly the best monsters/aliens ever!) Action filled, great for fans of Dr. Who but at the same time would be fab for anybody who loves a great story! Great, I recommend it - I hope Daniel Blythe writes another Dr. Who book, he is a really good author.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 11 May 2010
Having featured in three TV stories, plus assorted previous novels, comic strips and spin-off videos, the Autons are undoubtedly one of Doctor Who's classic monsters. The trouble with their repeat appearances however is to find something new to do with them. Daniel Blythe doesn't exactly re-invent the Autons here, but he uses them well, placing them in a closed environment that is a mixture of mega mall and theme park, and letting them run amok.

The storyline isn't always hugely original, with the author wearing his influences on his sleeve. We get a satirical treatment of 'The Apprentice', with Hyperville's boss putting several trainees through their paces; obvious caricatures of David and Victoria Beckham in football star 'Goldenball' Paul Kendrick and his pop sensation wife Shaneequi; even a trip through 'Westworld' territory before the end. None of that familiarity really matter however, as Blythe writes at such a frantic pace that the adventure barely flags from beginning to end. His 10th Doctor is also gloriously spot-on, adding immensely to the fun, and whilst the plot tends towards familiar moments of the Doctor trying to bring the humanity out in his opponents it's all slickly done. As is the norm for these late-period 10th Doctor novels, the Doctor travels alone here, with investigative journalist Kate taking the role of one-off compaion. In terms of character Kate is practically a young Sarah Jane Smith in all but name, but she works well here, and her journey through Hyperville works effectively as the book's heart.

Ultimately, 'Autonomy' may not win any prizes for originality, but as an enjoyable adventure this is very well done. There's also something very appropriate about having the Autons return for one of the last novels of Russell T Davies era of Doctor Who, a point driven home with one particularly cheeky reference to 'Rose'...
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 November 2009
Another original title featuring the Tenth incarnation of everybody's favourite Timelord, as embodied by David Tennant - and another new writer, Daniel Blythe proves himself worthy of the BBC range as his novel is fast-paced, gripping, and chock full of typical Doctor Who moments. The Autons, and their controller the Nestene Consciousness, are pliable villains who lend themselves well to the format - with their plastic servants now able to pose as real humans they are deadlier than ever, and it will take all of the Doctor's experience and cunning to stop the Nestene's latest attempt to conquer the Earth...
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 January 2010
This book is good if you like the Doctor Who monster the Autons, it is cleverly thought up plot, which has a little bit of Paraodx in it as well. Plus we get to see the year 2013 in the whoniverse a world where you can book rooms at a shopping centre it is so big. The Doctor also gets a minor companion called Kate. This book is well worth it.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Another doctor who novel which tells an all new story for the doctor that has never been seen on tv. like all in this range it runs for 243 pages, features a spot on characterisation of the doctor, and can be read by readers of all ages.

Like all the recent ones in the range it features the doctor travelling on his own. possibly some time after the tv story planet of the dead as it makes reference to his decision to travel without a companion.

The book features a return for the nestene consciousness and the autons, last seen in the very first episode of the new tv version. An alien conciousness with an affinity for plastic, it can control plastic and bring it to life. usually in the form of humanoid figurines with guns in their hands.

here the doctor visits hyperville, a huge new shopping mall outside london. you can stay here for days as there's so much to do. He, an investigate journalist called kate, and a couple of teenagers are all caught up in things when mannequins come to life and a deadly plan reveals itself.

This initially begins by seeming to be pitched towards a slightly younger audience than usual, and the introduction of some of the supporting characters comes over as being slightly clumsy. But as a mix of pop culture references - characters include a top england footballer and his pop star wife, although they're new characters created especially for the book and not what you might think - sociological comment and good old fashioned monster fighting this does rather click as it goes along. And it can take the time to consider moral issues as well. the title of the book is more relevant than you might suspect.

All of which leads to a climax that is well paced and less of a runaround that in some of the novels. and one of the best speeches this doctor has ever made. whilst the final scene may seem cliched, it's nonetheless exactly the right way for it to end.

A decent and entertaining entry in the range
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.