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Mr. Dixon Disappears (Mobile Library Mysteries) Paperback – Jul 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 257 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Paperbacks (July 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060822538
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060822538
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.5 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,407,660 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born in Essex, England, Ian Sansom is the author of the popular Mobile Library Mystery Series. He is also a frequent contributor and critic for The Guardian, The Daily Telegraph, The London Review of Books, and The Spectator. He is a regular broadcaster on BBC Radio 3 and Radio 4.
He studied at both Oxford and Cambridge and is a former Fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge. Currently, he teaches at Warwick University.

Product Description

Review

'Israel is one of the most original and amusing amateur sleuths around…’ The Times

'Bibliophiles will instinctively warm to Israel Armstrong, Jewish librarian, duffel-coat wearer and part-time detective. The fact that he drives his mobile library around the coast of Northern Ireland, moaning non-stop about people who do not return books on time, only makes the character more deliciously esoteric. This yarn about an ageing magician who has gone missing with £100,000 is the second in what promises to be a must-read series.' Sunday Telegraph

About the Author

Ian Sansom reviews regularly for the Guardian and the London Review of Books. His first book, The Truth About Babies, was published by Granta in 2002, and his second, Ring Road, by Fourth Estate in 2004.


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By S. P. Glover on 28 May 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Addictive lightly comic story but I wish Israel would lose his temper and stop saying sorry! I've never known anyone in real life who is so self-effacing
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By Elise on 26 April 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Really enjoyed the quirky investigator and the descriptions of the Irish culture, am already reading the series, it was a great read
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By Julia D on 9 Aug. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Easy read, especially if one is unwell
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 9 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Hapless Samson is in the thick of things again--good for us. 9 Aug. 2007
By Armchair Interviews - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Sansom, who lives in Northern Ireland, is a writer and reviewer for the Guardian and the London Review of Books. He is the author of The Impartial Recorder (published in England as the Ring Road), and The Case of the Missing Books, the first in the Mobile Library mysteries.

Poor Israel Armstrong arrives early at the Dixon and Pickering store on Easter Saturday and is let in by security guard to set up his exhibit on the history of the store. In inimitable Armstrong style, he of course sets up the display and then backs into a glass display case that crashes into another... you get the picture.

The caretaker shows up pale and shocked, and stammers out that they've been robbed-and Mr. Dixon is missing. Once the police arrive they decide that since Israel is there, and his fingerprints are all over everything, he must be guilty. He is interrogated and arrested. He is a wreck of nerves when he is finally bailed out; and he realizes he must find out what happened. The police certainly won't.

He has to rely on his old pal Ted and his cab service, unfortunately, as he has been put on suspension and has no access to the library van. Ted and Israel stumble around, and during their investigation they trip across clues that lead them to a solution-of sorts. It seems Mr. Dixon was a member of a local magician's society. How did he make himself and 100,000 pounds in cash disappear? His wife and daughter appear only slightly worried. His son, a shock-jock talk show host on Belfast morning radio, is estranged from his father but inadvertently provides a clue.

Sansom has created a zany tale of a careening search through Ireland featuring the somewhat hapless librarian Israel, struggling to survive in an alien land.

Armchair Interviews says: A mystery with lots of interesting characters.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Another book of the life of the librarian 4 Dec. 2008
By Fabric Crazy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Another good book of the life of the librarian. It is interesting to read of his mishaps and sometimes unbelievable things that happen to him. (who would agree to live in a chicken coop) I am glad I am not this poor guy. He just keeps plugging along and some how, some way he comes out on top.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
The ultimate outsider 18 Oct. 2008
By Margaret F. Baker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This tale of a nice Jewish librarian valiantly trying to be a good librarian in a totally new environment (to him) has both humor and pathos in it. The small community he is trying the serve both likes him and sees him as an outsider. This is the second in the series. Darn good!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I loved the beginning but then thought the book fell off 2 Feb. 2009
By P. Mann - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book was my first exposure to Ian Sansom, and I head read fewer than forty pages when I vowed to read everything Mr Sansom has written. The writing has such style and humor that I could imagine finishing the entire 253-page novel in two hours. Unfortunately, though, the plot kicked in, and I grew disenchanted.

Mobile librarian Israel Armstrong is at a department store setting up a display on the history of the store when a robbery and apparent kidnapping are uncovered. Before he knows it, Israel is in jail, apparently the prime suspect in the crime. It was at this point that the novel lost steam for me. The police seemed cartoonish, and the situation was absurd. I recognized that there is deliberate humor here, but I thought some of the situations lapsed into farce. Ionesco this is not.

I did finish the book and mostly enjoyed it, but I did so with the sense that there could have been so much more here.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I loved the beginning but then thought the book fell off 2 Feb. 2009
By P. Mann - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book was my first exposure to Ian Sansom, and I head read fewer than forty pages when I vowed to read everything Mr Sansom has written. The writing has such style and humor that I could imagine finishing the entire 253-page novel in two hours. Unfortunately, though, the plot kicked in, and I grew disenchanted.

Mobile librarian Israel Armstrong is at a department store setting up a display on the history of the store when a robbery and apparent kidnapping are uncovered. Before he knows it, Israel is in jail, apparently the prime suspect in the crime. It was at this point that the novel lost steam for me. The police seemed cartoonish, and the situation was absurd. I recognized that there is deliberate humor here, but I thought some of the situations lapsed into farce. Ionesco this is not.

I did finish the book and mostly enjoyed it, but I did so with the sense that there could have been so much more here.
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