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Jla TP Vol 08 Divided We Fall (Justice League (DC Comics) (paperback)) [Paperback]

Bryan Hitch , Paul Neary , Mark Waid
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
RRP: £14.99
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Book Description

20 April 2005 Justice League (DC Comics) (paperback) (Book 8)
Written by Mark Waid; Art by Bryan Hitch, Paul Neary and others The JLA has always been a team of superheroes that have relied on each other to defeat insurmountable odds. But with Batman's betrayal and expulsion from the group, suddenly the team has become divided amongst themselves. Dealing with dangerous issues of trust, Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, the Flash, Aquaman, Martiam Manhunter, and Plastic Man must try and unite to face off against the twisted fairy-tale nightmare of the Queen of Fables and the world-altering abilities of Dr. Destiny. But even if they defeat these formidable foes, the JLA may be shattered by their loss of faith in one another.

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Jla TP Vol 08 Divided We Fall (Justice League (DC Comics) (paperback)) + Jla TP Vol 06 World War Three (Justice League (DC Comics) (paperback))
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Product details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics; Gph edition (20 April 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563897938
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563897931
  • Product Dimensions: 26.2 x 16.7 x 1.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,402,101 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Still Divided? 14 Mar 2002
Format:Paperback
Following on directly after the Tower of Babel, the leaguers are still a man short after the expulsion of one of their founding members, and have to adapt quickly to their new formation. This proves to be harder than imagined as opinions are split on the expulsion, dividing the remaining seven in half!!
The reason behind this only getting three stars is because of the inconsistent storyline, instead of concentrating on the cracking underlying storyline (the lose of Batman) they trouble the JLA with what seems to be abstract and uneventful challenges. Although the last story of the three makes up for the previous two with a very interesting twist, this is still not one of Waids finest.
As usual the artwork is second to none, and the illustrators even dabble with a couple of new costumes. So if you are going to purchase this new JLA title make sure you read Tower of Babel first.
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Format:Paperback
These were originally published as JLA #47-#54.

These stories happen right after "Divided We Fall", where Batman gets voted out of the JLA. The remaining JLAers are still dealing with that, when the Queen of Fables is freed from a book and attacks with all manner of fairy tales. With the exception of the very interesting twist of an Aquaman / WonderWoman relationship which continues in this story (see panel 32), and the appearance of Batman and his supposed betrayal of the team, I found this story tedious compared to the others.

The JLAers then start to become divided, with the three that sided with Batman facing off with the three that sided against. Here the story gets going, with the six of them going after Dr. Destiny, who is changing reality, while Superman confronts Batman. Dr. Destiny is seemingly defeated at the same time that Superman and Batman agree there will be no secrets. They call the six other JLAers to Batman's cave, reveal their secret identities, join Batman back to the team....and then meet their alter-egos suited up. Their split-personalities have truly been split!

The ensuing story, with the civilian identities of the JLAers trying to resume normal lives, the superhereo identities of the JLAers battling "fulfillment of wishes" problems full time, with WonderWoman and Aquaman in the middle (they have no secret identities), is one of the best in the series. Both sides, with some exceptions, realize they can't live without their alter-egos, and that the creature "If" has been fulfilling wishes, including theirs to be separated.

The fact that "Eel" O'Brien, Plastic Man's alter-ego who is a former criminal, somewhat reunites the team, is one of the best stories on him in the series.

Fav panel: pg 137, where Kyle Raynor obsessivly covers his walls with JLA cartoons.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  11 reviews
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The big seven are Back together again 23 Sep 2003
By Rayhan S - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This collection follows directly after the Tower of Babel storyline. This follows as the JLA comes to terms with Batman's betrayal and consequent expulsion from the group. The first story involves the Queen of Fables, who have escaped from a book of fairy tales and is suffering from the Snow White's Stepmother Complex and is intent on bringing down Wonder Woman (in her eyes, Snow White). The JLA battle all types of fairy tales monsters and modern horror-flick creatures (Jason and even the Terminator). There's even a scene where the Martian Manhunter is being shoved into a burning oven by a witch a la Hensel and Gretel. Anyways, the JLA overcomes the odds but they are at a major crisis, where those that voted for Batman don't seem to see eye-to-eye w/ those who voted against him. Superman sees this problem and has a conversation w/ Batman where it shows how his betryal has left the JLA vulnerable and uneasy due to the distrust growing between them. To remedy this problem, Batman calls them to the Bat-cave but there's one problem, every single super-hero and their alter-egos have literally split (except for Aquaman and Wonder Woman). The split takes it toll on the JLA, as Mark Waid shows how one cannot co-exist w/out the other. Superman looks more like the Kryptonian ruler he had been forseen to be by his father and Clark Kent is afraid of his own shadow. Batman seems to be simply a machine w/ no personality and Bruce Wayne is a psychotic fop. Anyhow, at the end Plastic Man (actually his alter ego) comes to the rescue and sorts out this entire metaphysical mess. The JLA returns to all its glory with Batman welcomed back into the fold. I really enjoyed this story, it was epic in the sense that it involved the near end of the World but to me it seemed to hinge more on the personal side of the JLA. This contrasts greatly from Grant Morrison's epic tales which involved a cartload of chracters. Mark Waid has hit a homerun wih this story and I would recommend it to all comic book fans.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Character Study, If a Little Confoozin' 7 Jan 2003
By D. Brown - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Half of this book follows the aftermath of Tower of Babel
(wherein Batman 'betrays' the rest of the League) and the other half deals with one component of that 'betrayal'; the necessity of harboring a 'secret identity'.
After expelling Batman via a 4-3 vote, the JLA finds itself split like Repubs and Democrats; mistrust and petty sniping abound. Finally Supes and Bats have a heart-to-heart that is one of the best stories featuring these two together that has ever been done. If Frank Miller's "Return of the Dark Knight" was about the abject difference between these two, JLA #50 points out the similarities. From there we go to another storyline, where the membership is split up again, although in a totally different way. I won't give away details, suffice it to say it's an Alan Moore-esque study into the inner stress having a "secret identity" can create. It's gets a little complicated and overwrought, but hell, the entire JLA series from ish #1 to The Obsidian Age has been complicated and overwrought, so what the hey. A necessary companion piece to Tower of Babel.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fairy Tales and Wish Fulfillment 9 Feb 2002
By Ricky Hunter - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The newest gathering together of JLA adventures into one volume (Divided We Fall) is a tight package brought to us by Mard Waid and a number of pencillers. There are three major conflicts with the connecting thread the sub-storyline of the Batman being accepted back into the JLA after his removal (including some nice scenes with his old friend, Superman). The wonderful use of fairy tales and the treat of seeing the heroes split apart from their secret identities give this volume its best moments to begin and end the book respectively. The themes of fantasy and wish fulfillment are exploited with great skill in each of the stories. Plastic Man is still an awkard fit in the League but the last story does at least provide a little emotional depth to his character. It would be nice to have his skills and abilities being used more fully, in addition to his (at times forced) comic relief. All in all, a good volume and more fine work from Mark Waid, who still manages to squeeze a little more juice from these (rather tired, at times) icons.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great split personality story, so-so fairy tale story 6 Jan 2007
By Larry Ketchersid - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
These were originally published as JLA #47-#54.

These stories happen right after "Divided We Fall", where Batman gets voted out of the JLA. The remaining JLAers are still dealing with that, when the Queen of Fables is freed from a book and attacks with all manner of fairy tales. With the exception of the very interesting twist of an Aquaman / WonderWoman relationship which continues in this story (see panel 32), and the appearance of Batman and his supposed betrayal of the team, I found this story tedious compared to the others.

The JLAers then start to become divided, with the three that sided with Batman facing off with the three that sided against. Here the story gets going, with the six of them going after Dr. Destiny, who is changing reality, while Superman confronts Batman. Dr. Destiny is seemingly defeated at the same time that Superman and Batman agree there will be no secrets. They call the six other JLAers to Batman's cave, reveal their secret identities, join Batman back to the team....and then meet their alter-egos suited up. Their split-personalities have truly been split!

The ensuing story, with the civilian identities of the JLAers trying to resume normal lives, the superhereo identities of the JLAers battling "fulfillment of wishes" problems full time, with WonderWoman and Aquaman in the middle (they have no secret identities), is one of the best in the series. Both sides, with some exceptions, realize they can't live without their alter-egos, and that the creature "If" has been fulfilling wishes, including theirs to be separated.

The fact that "Eel" O'Brien, Plastic Man's alter-ego who is a former criminal, somewhat reunites the team, is one of the best stories on him in the series.

Fav panel: pg 137, where Kyle Raynor obsessivly covers his walls with JLA cartoons.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best yet? Maybe! 11 May 2002
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I laughed more in this tpb than I did in any other JLA books to date. The artist seems to really have the facial expressions down, and they seem to fit what the character would actually look like under difficult, embarrassing situations. But what I liked most about this book was the fact that I was able to see interesting things that I hadn't imagined possible in JLA. For instance, Wonder Woman gets a romantic kiss from a team member (I'm not telling, go get the book...), Superman gets flustered, Batman gets his tail whipped by a team member (you'll never guess), most of the team gets to be normal, and finally, Plastic Man gets some character development. About Plastic Man, I'd have to say that this book rescued him in my eyes. He was really starting to get on my nerves as the comedian all the time. Hopefully, some of the maturity will stick with him. The stories are interesting enough, but the main storyline is the whole batman-kicked-out-of-the-league-how-does-he-get-back-in... Anyway, excellent book. I highly recomend it for any fans of JLA!
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