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Directing for Animation: Everything You Didn't Learn in Art School Paperback – 4 Oct 2013


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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Focal Press (4 Oct 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0240818024
  • ISBN-13: 978-0240818023
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 19 x 1.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 85,521 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

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Product Description

About the Author

Tony Bancroft, director of Disney's Mulan, is an award-winning animator whose work is well-known to animation audiences. He served as supervising animator on new Disney classics The Lion King and The Emperor's New Groove, for which he created the recognizable characters Pumbaa and Kronk. He has gained experience in every artistic position from assistant animator to director, serving as the animation supervisor over all CG characters in Stuart Little 2 (Sony), and gaining directorial credits on numerous animated commercials for Disney, Hasbro, and others. Bancroft’s years of experience have culminated in the founding of his own animation studio, Toonacious Family Entertainment, where he directs and produces commercials and direct-to-DVD projects. A multiple animation award-winner, Bancroft’s proudest moment came when he was given the Annie award for Best Director for his work on Disney’s Mulan.


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Parka HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 25 Aug 2014
Format: Paperback
Length: 1:01 Mins
This book is written mainly for animators and those who want to learn more about animation directing. While I'm not into creating animation, I still learned a great deal from the stories and tips that come Tony Bancroft and the directors that were interviewed. The writeup is incredibly insightful.

Content is organised into eight chapters that look at the different aspect of directing an animation. The topics covered include finding the vision, understanding the workflow, story, working with people, handling politics, managing budgets and schedules and finding ways to learn and improve constantly.

Note that this is not a guided course to animation directing, but lessons and tips written from Tony Bancroft's perspective as animator and director for the several films he has worked on. The tone used throughout is enthusiastic and almost infectious.

Each chapter ends with a lengthy Q&A with an acclaimed director. It's basically an all-stars list of directors featuring John Musker (Aladdin), Nick Park (Wallace and Gromit), Dean DeBlois (How to Train Your Dragon), Jennifer Yuh Nelson (Kung Fu Panda), Pete Doctor (Monsters Inc), Eric Goldberg (Pocahontas), Chris Wedge (Ice Age) and Tim Miller from Blur Studios. It's a mix of directors with experience in stop motion, 2D and 3D animation.

The interviews don't actually follow the topics of the chapters. Instead, the directors talk about how they made it to directing, the challenges, developing and managing the film, the stages of production, responsibilities, budgets, handling people and even how they feel about meetings. There are a lot of interesting war stories. Just like Tony Bancroft, you can also feel the passion when they start sharing about the work they do.

Overall, it's a really insightful and educational book that uncovers the mysterious of what animation directors really do.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 12 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Great Introduction to Directing Animation 2 Nov 2013
By Kathryn MacKie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Tony Bancroft has crafted a refreshingly honest and insightful look at the work of Directing for animation. It is filled with great stories, interesting interviews with industry leaders, and sage wisdom. Bancroft's story about directing the voice session with Eddie Murphy alone is worth the price of admission. Bancroft pulls few punches with frank talk about creative road blocks, failures and triumphs, complicated producer relationships, and more. Bancroft speaks with authority as a creative who started as an animator and climbed to prominence in the heyday of modern Disney animation. Any friend of Pumbaa is a friend of mine. Highly recommended.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
A Good Insider's View of Animation Directing 14 Oct 2013
By Chad Frye - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Directing for Animation" is a good insider's view of the experience of directing for large studios such as Disney and Sony, and for directing independent projects. Bancroft attacks the subject from having come up through the ranks as an animator to the captain's chair of director on a variety of projects. He covers topics such as how to deal with the different personalities of your crew, how to balance your vision with what the studio heads want, how to work with voice actors, and most of all, how to serve your crew so that they will want to give you their best work.

A true delight in the book are the many interviews with very experienced animation directors. Of note are the interviews with Nick Park ("Wallace & Gromit") who gives some good insight into working in stop-motion, and with Eric Goldberg whose experience is not only with feature films ("Pocahontas"), but also with commercials where time and budgets can be very tight.

Before reading this book, it is a good idea that the reader already has a rudimentary understanding of animation terminology and a bit of the process, which you will likely have if you have read any "art of" book out there. This is not a step-by-step book on the animation process, nor is it intended to be. After all, you need to know what animation is before you direct it. However, this book WILL give you a good understanding of what you will face when someone next hands you some money and a deadline.
Insightful look into animation direction 25 Aug 2014
By Parka - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is written mainly for animators and those who want to learn more about animation directing. While I'm not into creating animation, I still learned a great deal from the stories and tips that come Tony Bancroft and the directors that were interviewed. The writeup is incredibly insightful.

Content is organised into eight chapters that look at the different aspect of directing an animation. The topics covered include finding the vision, understanding the workflow, story, working with people, handling politics, managing budgets and schedules and finding ways to learn and improve constantly.

Note that this is not a guided course to animation directing, but lessons and tips written from Tony Bancroft's perspective as animator and director for the several films he has worked on. The tone used throughout is enthusiastic and almost infectious.

Each chapter ends with a lengthy Q&A with an acclaimed director. It's basically an all-stars list of directors featuring John Musker (Aladdin), Nick Park (Wallace and Gromit), Dean DeBlois (How to Train Your Dragon), Jennifer Yuh Nelson (Kung Fu Panda), Pete Doctor (Monsters Inc), Eric Goldberg (Pocahontas), Chris Wedge (Ice Age) and Tim Miller from Blur Studios. It's a mix of directors with experience in stop motion, 2D and 3D animation.

The interviews don't actually follow the topics of the chapters. Instead, the directors talk about how they made it to directing, the challenges, developing and managing the film, the stages of production, responsibilities, budgets, handling people and even how they feel about meetings. There are a lot of interesting war stories. Just like Tony Bancroft, you can also feel the passion when they start sharing about the work they do.

Overall, it's a really insightful and educational book that uncovers the mysterious of what animation directors really do.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A good guide to understand directing on animations movies 1 Oct 2013
By Levy Maduro - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Really useful book, it let you understand what directing animation is like, with great interviews from directors of greatest animation movies, it may not tell you everything but a book can't tell you how to live your life but it may teach you what decisions to take.
Valuable addition to animation bookshelf 6 Mar 2014
By Steven Ng - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This area of animation doesn't get much attention from animation writers. This really helped to explain the role of a director in a big studio production. Loved the interviews with other directors.
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