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Dinosaurs: A Field Guide Hardcover – 31 Oct 2010


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: A & C Black Publishers Ltd; 1st Edition edition (31 Oct. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1408130742
  • ISBN-13: 978-1408130742
  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 2.8 x 28 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 260,579 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Gregory Paul is an independent scholar and 'paleoartist.' He is author and illustrator of Predatory Dinosaurs of the World (Simon & Schuster, 1989) and Dinosaurs of the Air (Johns Hopkins, 2002), and editor of The Scientific American Book of the Dinosaurs (St Martin's Press, 2003). His scientific writings and papers have appeared in Scientific American, The New York Times, Nature and numerous specialist journals and publications.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Lee Boyes on 24 Oct. 2011
Format: Hardcover
I am not an out-and-out palaeontologist more an amateur enthusiast so I can of course only review this as one.
This book contains an interesting up-to-date overview of dinosaur fossil discoveries and theories about dinosaurs evolution/habits and such like. This is a relatively short (about 60-odd pages) introduction into the bulk of the book. The bulk is an overview of every dinosaur species. These refer to their fossil remains/locality/habitats/size/habits/anatomy and general notes based on the latest knowledge. Of course there is an element interperitation of the fossils and related evidence but we do not have every fact to hand and never will. The conclusions reached a certainly based on sound reasoning and are not fringe opinions. The book contains good illustrations (outer and skeletal) of about 3/4 of the dinosaurs referenced. (The only reason I assume they are all not pictured is that some so closely related to be hardly different, for example Carcharodontasaurus and Giganotasaurus.)
This book could be used for various purposes (in my case just to know that bit more) but is perhaps best as a quick reference book. I certainly feel that bit more 'complete' in my understanding than I did before I bought this.

Any questions feel free to ask in the comments area I'll try to answer you as quick as I can. (And as best as I can!)

Hope this review helps
Lee
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By H. A. Weedon TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 4 Aug. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a well written, very readable, excellently illustrated and up to date book about dinosaurs, which classifies them into their orders, families and species in readily assimilated fashion. Best of all, it shows both how many theropod dinosaurs grew feathers and how they gave rise to birds, and the work includes many illustrations of various theropod dinosaurs covered in feathers. Early birds such as archaeopteryx are included among the theropods. It really is amazing how many theropods had feathers. As dinosaurs evolved their brains grew bigger until the most advanced of them became as bright as birds.

The theropod dinosaurs were mostly bipedal, moving around on their hind legs and using their front feet for a variety of purposes. It's fascinating to see illustrated how the different species adapted their hands for doing all kinds of things and how, in some species, their front limbs evolved into wings. The various species of tyrannosaurs belong to the theropod dinosaurs, which include the only truly carnivorous dinosaurs. There are two more kinds of dinosaur: sauropdomorphs and ornithischians, all of which were mainly herbivorous.

The sauropodomorphs are the ones with very long necks and very long tails and they all walked on all fours. They are among the largest animals that ever lived. Only the extant blue whale is bigger, a fact cleverly illustrated on page 49 where the sizes of various mammals and dinosaurs are compared.

Ornithischians, or 'bird hipped' dinosaurs are dealt with in the third section of the book. This section contains 'old favourites' such as triceratops and anklopollexia. Ornithoschians are very confusing kinds of dinosaurs because, although they have bird hips, none of them ever evolved into birds.
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0 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Ms. Josephine Allan on 5 Jan. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am sure this is comprehensive, but hard going.
one two three four five six seven eight nine ten eleven........
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Great but not perfect 20 Jan. 2013
By Pangr - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Personally I think,this book isn't suitable for young readers.Everything is written in detail and someone not familiar with paleontological issues will find it hard to follow because of the quantity of information that comes while reading.The book is intented to be bought by paleontology enthousiasts,amateurs and semi-professionals.I found the 60-paged foreword quite interesting.The way the author classifies the dinosaur taxa can sometimes be confusing.I must confess that I'm not huge fan of Greg Paul's illustrations,they just seem to me more artistic than realistic and lifelike.The same holds for this book.Although I didn't enjoy the few image illustrations,I did like the skeletal drawings and the vast majority of dinosaur portraits(the truly huge heads in mamenchisaurids on one hand and the ridiculously small heads in ornithomimosaurs on the other are two examples of what I describe as author's exaggeration).Set aside those minor frauds I would recommend that field-guide to everyone who want to expand their knowledge about these magnificent animals.After reading this book I felt I knew more about the Mesozoic!
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