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Dinah Washington

 

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What A Diffrence A Day Makes What A Difference A Day Makes - HD Remastered 2010
2:27
September In The Rain September In The Rain
2:11
What a Diff'rence a Day Made What a Difference a Day Makes
2:40
Mad About The Boy The Essential Dinah Washington
2:49
Drinking Again Dinah Washington - Very Best Of
3:29
Drinking Again Dinah Washington
3:42
I Understand The Collection Volume Two
2:38
Is You Is or Is You Ain't My Baby Is You Is or Is You Ain't My Baby
3:00
Coquette Dinah Washington
2:58
I'll Close My Eyes The Butler Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
3:56

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At a Glance

Birthname: Ruth Lee Jones
Nationality: American
Born: Aug 29 1924
Died: Dec 14 1963 (39 years old)


Biography

Historical union of jazz's biggest labels results in the September 24, 2002

release of 14 wholly encompassing CDs by many of the music's greatest stars

For the first time in their histories, the prestigious jazz labels The Verve Music Group and Blue Note Records have joined forces to create The Definitive Series, remarkable collections of classic jazz artists compiled from both companies' archives. Each of the 14 CDs being released on September 24, 2002 represents the definitive recording highlights of giants of the jazz world. Included in the collections are popular tunes and overlooked ... Read more

Historical union of jazz's biggest labels results in the September 24, 2002

release of 14 wholly encompassing CDs by many of the music's greatest stars

For the first time in their histories, the prestigious jazz labels The Verve Music Group and Blue Note Records have joined forces to create The Definitive Series, remarkable collections of classic jazz artists compiled from both companies' archives. Each of the 14 CDs being released on September 24, 2002 represents the definitive recording highlights of giants of the jazz world. Included in the collections are popular tunes and overlooked gems that showcase the range and brilliance of each musician.

Because all the artists in this series recorded for various labels during the primes of their careers, The Definitive Series compiles for the very first time the very best of the best. The music was drawn from the diverse catalogs associated with Verve and Blue Note, including Capitol, Decca, EmArcy, Impulse!, Mercury, MGM, Pacific Jazz, Roost and Roulette. The compilations were

selected and sequenced by such veteran jazz figures as Michael Cuscuna, Tom Evered, Dan Morganstern and Richard Seidel. Liner notes for each album in the series were written by noteworthy editors, authors and journalists including Peter Keepnews, Arnold Laubich, Brian Priestley, Robert Pruter, Peter Pullman, Doug Ramsey and Chris Sheridan.

Verve and Blue Note will each issue seven Definitive Series CDs. Verve's definitive samplings focus on the careers of Clifford Brown, Stan Getz, Joe Henderson, George Shearing, Sarah Vaughan, Dinah Washington and Joe Williams. Blue Note will release definitive recordings by Cannonball Adderley, Chet Baker, Nat "King" Cole, Bud Powell, Jimmy Smith, Art Tatum and McCoy Tyner.

VERVE RELEASES:

2 The Definitive Clifford Brown

Trumpeter Clifford Brown died tragically at the age of 25 in a car accident in 1956, four short years after he made his first jazz recordings. With his fat, warm tone and his mastery of bop, Brown quickly became a jazz giant, and his singular sound continues to influence trumpeters today. Liner notes writer Donald Elfman points out that Brownie "created a place for himself in jazz history by combining technical wizardry with love of melody and a sense of musical architecture and logic." He adds, "Every phrase sounded at one and the same time truly improvised and logically constructed. His ever-present sense of melody was the foundation for all that he spontaneously created. His sweetness and warmth informed every note, turning his solos into bursts of

joyous, optimistic spirit."

Brown's earliest recordings were on Blue Note, sampled on this CD with his 1953 jazz recording debut performing the lyrical "Easy Living" and his soaring solo through "Wee Dot" on a live Art Blakey date at Birdland. His best work came in the company of drummer Max Roach on their EmArcy recordings, which included saxophonists Harold Land and later Sonny Rollins.

The Definitive Clifford Brown also captures the trumpeter's performances with vocalists Dinah Washington, Helen Merrill and Sarah Vaughan. Highlights of the collection include a lush string rendition of "Stardust" and the swinging "Joy Spring," featuring Brownie's flowing solo.

3 The Definitive Stan Getz

Tenor saxophonist Stan Getz had his share of hit recordings throughout his career, beginning with the wistful ballad "Early Autumn" while a member of Woody Herman's band in 1948. He duplicated the magic a few years later on his own with "Moonlight," making him a jazz star. Other career highlights include his spirited solo on the swinging "Tour's End" as a guest of Oscar Peterson and his trio in 1957, the mysterious and joyful orchestral number "Once Upon

a Time" from the 1961 seven-part suite Focus and an ebullient duet of "Night and Day" in 1991 with pianist Kenny Barron, recorded shortly before the tenor's death. Also included are Getz's two mammoth 1963 bossa nova hits with João Gilberto and Antonio Carlos Jobim: "Desafinado" and "The Girl from Ipanema."

The Definitive Stan Getz collects his best recordings over his four-decade career. Liner notes writer Doug Ramsey points out that Getz was a great melodicist on his tenor saxophone: "[He] was one of those rare musicians with a direct line from their minds to their fingers..He was a superb interpreter of songs that were written by others and, as one of the most accomplished

improvisers in jazz, he spontaneously created melodic lines that often rivaled or surpassed those of the songs themselves. His tone, full and sensual, was a key element in making him one of the most popular jazz artists of his time."

4 The Definitive Joe Henderson

A distinctive-voiced tenor saxophonist, Joe Henderson was both a relative late-comer to New York's classic jazz scene (1962) and to stardom (popular appreciation of his immense talents did not come until the '90s). At home playing straight-ahead jazz, blues, avant garde and bossa nova, Henderson recorded for Blue Note from 1963-66 and-after a decade recording a number of

impressive albums for Milestone and another nine years freelancing-returned to the label in 1985 for his live Village Vanguard recording The State of the Tenor. It has been generally regarded as Joe's "comeback," even though he had been continuously working. However, his greatest fame came in the '90s after he signed with Verve and released several superb CDs, including tributes to

Billy Strayhorn, Antonio Carlos Jobim and Miles Davis.

The Definitive Joe Henderson captures the tenor saxophonist in his early recording career with the Latin-tinged lead-off number "Recorda Me" (1963) and the spirited "Inner Urge" (1964), both his own compositions. From The State of the Tenor is his imaginative rendition of Sam Rivers' "Beatrice." The collection also features selections from the tenor saxophonist's four Verve albums, including his compelling solo version of "Lush Life" and the rousing big band number "Without a Song." Commenting on Henderson's playing, liner notes writer Peter Keepnews says, .[A]lthough he had an impressive arsenal of squeals, honks, staccato bursts, and sinuous trills, what made his playing truly special was his sense of melodic structure: Even at their most ferocious and unfettered, his improvisations always had a clearly defined beginning, middle, and end."

The Definitive George Shearing

London-born pianist George Shearing has enjoyed one of the longest recording careers of jazz musicians. He moved from England to the U.S. in the late forties and in 1949 developed his famous quintet, comprising a vibraphonist, guitarist, drummer and bassist. His cool and vibrant style of playing became popular during the fifties. Liner notes writer Brian Priestley notes that

he played piano with a "parallel-motion 'locked hands' approach." He adds that Shearing "played attractive standard songs in that distinctive voicing, but with the vibraphone doubling the top note of his right-hand chords and the guitar at the same pitch as his left hand."

Shearing's first popularity came with his 1949 quintet recording of "September in the Rain" and continued with a gorgeous solo take on "Tenderly" in 1950. Also included on The Definitive George Shearing is his spirited 1952 performance of his classic composition "Lullaby of Birdland" and a fine Latin-spiced rendition in 1957 of Horace Silver's "Señor Blues." The collection concludes with his 1962 touching version of "Over the Rainbow" with young vibraphonist Gary Burton. Notes Priestley, "Heard superficially, the signature sound can seem rather homogenized, yet Shearing's arrangements make significant play with dynamics and use subtleties of timing, voicing, and reharmonization."

5 The Definitive Sarah Vaughan

Heralded as one of the 20th century's greatest singers, Sarah Vaughan had a wide range (four octaves), great musicianship (she sang bebop tunes with the improvisational quality of a horn) and durability (she graced the jazz world with her instrument for five decades). In the words of critic Martin Williams, Vaughan "undertook . a challenging musical adventure each time she

sang. [S]he found . an adventure in the most ordinary ditty as well as in the best of our popular songs."

The Definitive Sarah Vaughan samples the most important decades of her career, beginning with her 1949 duet of "Dedicated to You" with Billy Eckstine and concluding in 1967 with a ballad-to-swing take on the Richard Rodgers number "The Sweetest Sounds." Every track is a gem, with special highlights including Vaughan's graceful, scatting spin through "Lullaby of Birdland" (with Clifford Brown on trumpet) in 1954 and a sumptuous, strings-filled version of "Misty" with the Quincy Jones Orchestra in 1958. Liner notes writer Doug Ramsey concludes, "Through it all, we hear Vaughan's incomparable phrasing, vocal control, and taste. We hear her taking chances

and enjoying the rewards of her adventurousness. And, always, we hear the richness, sweep, and drama of her voice, which throughout her life retained every aspect of its glory."

6 The Definitive Dinah Washington

One of the great singers of the forties and fifties, Dinah Washington had fans on the blues circuit early in her career and later caught fire with the r&b and jazz crowds. With her alluring high-pitched voice, she was a hitmaker at ease in crossing over from r&b to pop music. Liner notes writer Robert Pruter comments: "What allowed Washington to appeal to such disparate

audiences, and in truth gave her many careers, was her musical ability. She was a distinctive stylist with a strong vocal identity - a tart timbre that could sound sassy and bittersweet, and sometimes poignant. She transformed every kind of song that she touched - pop standards, blues, and jazz - and made them identifiably hers."

The Definitive Dinah Washington covers the scope of her entire career, beginning with her bouncy 1943 12-bar blues hit "Evil Gal Blues" (written by jazz scribe Leonard Feather) and concluding with 1962 recordings for the Roulette label (shortly before she died). Highlights include her 1949 r&b hit "New Blowtop Blues," her 1954 swinging seven-minute rendition of the Gershwin

tune "A Foggy Day" (which garnered her a jazz audience), her blues-drenched rendition of Hank Snow's country hit "I Don't Hurt Anymore," her lush 1959 pop hit "What a Diff'rence a Day Makes" and her 1961 pop-r&b hit duet with Brook Benton, "Baby (You Got What It Takes)," a catchy strings-with-beat beauty.

7 The Definitive Joe Williams

The baritone-voiced Joe Williams sang blues, ballads and standards in a singular fashion. The Definitive Joe Williams liner notes writer Chris Sheridan quotes the vocalist as once telling Tony Bennett, "It's not that you want to sing, it's that you have to sing." Sheridan adds, "This drive made

Williams one of the most popular and expressive singers in all of jazz and a key factor in the success of the renowned big band that Count Basie re-established in the mid-1950s."

Nine tunes in this collection document Williams' time with Basie groups, beginning in 1954. The most famous numbers from that association are featured here, including the bouncing "Every Day I Have the Blues" (which entered the Recording Hall of Fame in 1993), the swinging r&b "All Right, Okay, You Win" and the charged beauty "Goin' to Chicago." There are also several collaborations with trumpeter Harry "Sweets" Ellison, including the gracefully swinging "Alone Together." Other highlights include Williams' 1987 live recording of the buoyant, scat-brimming "Sometimes I'm Happy" and the gorgeous blues-ballad "What Are You Doing New Year's Eve?"

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Historical union of jazz's biggest labels results in the September 24, 2002

release of 14 wholly encompassing CDs by many of the music's greatest stars

For the first time in their histories, the prestigious jazz labels The Verve Music Group and Blue Note Records have joined forces to create The Definitive Series, remarkable collections of classic jazz artists compiled from both companies' archives. Each of the 14 CDs being released on September 24, 2002 represents the definitive recording highlights of giants of the jazz world. Included in the collections are popular tunes and overlooked gems that showcase the range and brilliance of each musician.

Because all the artists in this series recorded for various labels during the primes of their careers, The Definitive Series compiles for the very first time the very best of the best. The music was drawn from the diverse catalogs associated with Verve and Blue Note, including Capitol, Decca, EmArcy, Impulse!, Mercury, MGM, Pacific Jazz, Roost and Roulette. The compilations were

selected and sequenced by such veteran jazz figures as Michael Cuscuna, Tom Evered, Dan Morganstern and Richard Seidel. Liner notes for each album in the series were written by noteworthy editors, authors and journalists including Peter Keepnews, Arnold Laubich, Brian Priestley, Robert Pruter, Peter Pullman, Doug Ramsey and Chris Sheridan.

Verve and Blue Note will each issue seven Definitive Series CDs. Verve's definitive samplings focus on the careers of Clifford Brown, Stan Getz, Joe Henderson, George Shearing, Sarah Vaughan, Dinah Washington and Joe Williams. Blue Note will release definitive recordings by Cannonball Adderley, Chet Baker, Nat "King" Cole, Bud Powell, Jimmy Smith, Art Tatum and McCoy Tyner.

VERVE RELEASES:

2 The Definitive Clifford Brown

Trumpeter Clifford Brown died tragically at the age of 25 in a car accident in 1956, four short years after he made his first jazz recordings. With his fat, warm tone and his mastery of bop, Brown quickly became a jazz giant, and his singular sound continues to influence trumpeters today. Liner notes writer Donald Elfman points out that Brownie "created a place for himself in jazz history by combining technical wizardry with love of melody and a sense of musical architecture and logic." He adds, "Every phrase sounded at one and the same time truly improvised and logically constructed. His ever-present sense of melody was the foundation for all that he spontaneously created. His sweetness and warmth informed every note, turning his solos into bursts of

joyous, optimistic spirit."

Brown's earliest recordings were on Blue Note, sampled on this CD with his 1953 jazz recording debut performing the lyrical "Easy Living" and his soaring solo through "Wee Dot" on a live Art Blakey date at Birdland. His best work came in the company of drummer Max Roach on their EmArcy recordings, which included saxophonists Harold Land and later Sonny Rollins.

The Definitive Clifford Brown also captures the trumpeter's performances with vocalists Dinah Washington, Helen Merrill and Sarah Vaughan. Highlights of the collection include a lush string rendition of "Stardust" and the swinging "Joy Spring," featuring Brownie's flowing solo.

3 The Definitive Stan Getz

Tenor saxophonist Stan Getz had his share of hit recordings throughout his career, beginning with the wistful ballad "Early Autumn" while a member of Woody Herman's band in 1948. He duplicated the magic a few years later on his own with "Moonlight," making him a jazz star. Other career highlights include his spirited solo on the swinging "Tour's End" as a guest of Oscar Peterson and his trio in 1957, the mysterious and joyful orchestral number "Once Upon

a Time" from the 1961 seven-part suite Focus and an ebullient duet of "Night and Day" in 1991 with pianist Kenny Barron, recorded shortly before the tenor's death. Also included are Getz's two mammoth 1963 bossa nova hits with João Gilberto and Antonio Carlos Jobim: "Desafinado" and "The Girl from Ipanema."

The Definitive Stan Getz collects his best recordings over his four-decade career. Liner notes writer Doug Ramsey points out that Getz was a great melodicist on his tenor saxophone: "[He] was one of those rare musicians with a direct line from their minds to their fingers..He was a superb interpreter of songs that were written by others and, as one of the most accomplished

improvisers in jazz, he spontaneously created melodic lines that often rivaled or surpassed those of the songs themselves. His tone, full and sensual, was a key element in making him one of the most popular jazz artists of his time."

4 The Definitive Joe Henderson

A distinctive-voiced tenor saxophonist, Joe Henderson was both a relative late-comer to New York's classic jazz scene (1962) and to stardom (popular appreciation of his immense talents did not come until the '90s). At home playing straight-ahead jazz, blues, avant garde and bossa nova, Henderson recorded for Blue Note from 1963-66 and-after a decade recording a number of

impressive albums for Milestone and another nine years freelancing-returned to the label in 1985 for his live Village Vanguard recording The State of the Tenor. It has been generally regarded as Joe's "comeback," even though he had been continuously working. However, his greatest fame came in the '90s after he signed with Verve and released several superb CDs, including tributes to

Billy Strayhorn, Antonio Carlos Jobim and Miles Davis.

The Definitive Joe Henderson captures the tenor saxophonist in his early recording career with the Latin-tinged lead-off number "Recorda Me" (1963) and the spirited "Inner Urge" (1964), both his own compositions. From The State of the Tenor is his imaginative rendition of Sam Rivers' "Beatrice." The collection also features selections from the tenor saxophonist's four Verve albums, including his compelling solo version of "Lush Life" and the rousing big band number "Without a Song." Commenting on Henderson's playing, liner notes writer Peter Keepnews says, .[A]lthough he had an impressive arsenal of squeals, honks, staccato bursts, and sinuous trills, what made his playing truly special was his sense of melodic structure: Even at their most ferocious and unfettered, his improvisations always had a clearly defined beginning, middle, and end."

The Definitive George Shearing

London-born pianist George Shearing has enjoyed one of the longest recording careers of jazz musicians. He moved from England to the U.S. in the late forties and in 1949 developed his famous quintet, comprising a vibraphonist, guitarist, drummer and bassist. His cool and vibrant style of playing became popular during the fifties. Liner notes writer Brian Priestley notes that

he played piano with a "parallel-motion 'locked hands' approach." He adds that Shearing "played attractive standard songs in that distinctive voicing, but with the vibraphone doubling the top note of his right-hand chords and the guitar at the same pitch as his left hand."

Shearing's first popularity came with his 1949 quintet recording of "September in the Rain" and continued with a gorgeous solo take on "Tenderly" in 1950. Also included on The Definitive George Shearing is his spirited 1952 performance of his classic composition "Lullaby of Birdland" and a fine Latin-spiced rendition in 1957 of Horace Silver's "Señor Blues." The collection concludes with his 1962 touching version of "Over the Rainbow" with young vibraphonist Gary Burton. Notes Priestley, "Heard superficially, the signature sound can seem rather homogenized, yet Shearing's arrangements make significant play with dynamics and use subtleties of timing, voicing, and reharmonization."

5 The Definitive Sarah Vaughan

Heralded as one of the 20th century's greatest singers, Sarah Vaughan had a wide range (four octaves), great musicianship (she sang bebop tunes with the improvisational quality of a horn) and durability (she graced the jazz world with her instrument for five decades). In the words of critic Martin Williams, Vaughan "undertook . a challenging musical adventure each time she

sang. [S]he found . an adventure in the most ordinary ditty as well as in the best of our popular songs."

The Definitive Sarah Vaughan samples the most important decades of her career, beginning with her 1949 duet of "Dedicated to You" with Billy Eckstine and concluding in 1967 with a ballad-to-swing take on the Richard Rodgers number "The Sweetest Sounds." Every track is a gem, with special highlights including Vaughan's graceful, scatting spin through "Lullaby of Birdland" (with Clifford Brown on trumpet) in 1954 and a sumptuous, strings-filled version of "Misty" with the Quincy Jones Orchestra in 1958. Liner notes writer Doug Ramsey concludes, "Through it all, we hear Vaughan's incomparable phrasing, vocal control, and taste. We hear her taking chances

and enjoying the rewards of her adventurousness. And, always, we hear the richness, sweep, and drama of her voice, which throughout her life retained every aspect of its glory."

6 The Definitive Dinah Washington

One of the great singers of the forties and fifties, Dinah Washington had fans on the blues circuit early in her career and later caught fire with the r&b and jazz crowds. With her alluring high-pitched voice, she was a hitmaker at ease in crossing over from r&b to pop music. Liner notes writer Robert Pruter comments: "What allowed Washington to appeal to such disparate

audiences, and in truth gave her many careers, was her musical ability. She was a distinctive stylist with a strong vocal identity - a tart timbre that could sound sassy and bittersweet, and sometimes poignant. She transformed every kind of song that she touched - pop standards, blues, and jazz - and made them identifiably hers."

The Definitive Dinah Washington covers the scope of her entire career, beginning with her bouncy 1943 12-bar blues hit "Evil Gal Blues" (written by jazz scribe Leonard Feather) and concluding with 1962 recordings for the Roulette label (shortly before she died). Highlights include her 1949 r&b hit "New Blowtop Blues," her 1954 swinging seven-minute rendition of the Gershwin

tune "A Foggy Day" (which garnered her a jazz audience), her blues-drenched rendition of Hank Snow's country hit "I Don't Hurt Anymore," her lush 1959 pop hit "What a Diff'rence a Day Makes" and her 1961 pop-r&b hit duet with Brook Benton, "Baby (You Got What It Takes)," a catchy strings-with-beat beauty.

7 The Definitive Joe Williams

The baritone-voiced Joe Williams sang blues, ballads and standards in a singular fashion. The Definitive Joe Williams liner notes writer Chris Sheridan quotes the vocalist as once telling Tony Bennett, "It's not that you want to sing, it's that you have to sing." Sheridan adds, "This drive made

Williams one of the most popular and expressive singers in all of jazz and a key factor in the success of the renowned big band that Count Basie re-established in the mid-1950s."

Nine tunes in this collection document Williams' time with Basie groups, beginning in 1954. The most famous numbers from that association are featured here, including the bouncing "Every Day I Have the Blues" (which entered the Recording Hall of Fame in 1993), the swinging r&b "All Right, Okay, You Win" and the charged beauty "Goin' to Chicago." There are also several collaborations with trumpeter Harry "Sweets" Ellison, including the gracefully swinging "Alone Together." Other highlights include Williams' 1987 live recording of the buoyant, scat-brimming "Sometimes I'm Happy" and the gorgeous blues-ballad "What Are You Doing New Year's Eve?"

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Historical union of jazz's biggest labels results in the September 24, 2002

release of 14 wholly encompassing CDs by many of the music's greatest stars

For the first time in their histories, the prestigious jazz labels The Verve Music Group and Blue Note Records have joined forces to create The Definitive Series, remarkable collections of classic jazz artists compiled from both companies' archives. Each of the 14 CDs being released on September 24, 2002 represents the definitive recording highlights of giants of the jazz world. Included in the collections are popular tunes and overlooked gems that showcase the range and brilliance of each musician.

Because all the artists in this series recorded for various labels during the primes of their careers, The Definitive Series compiles for the very first time the very best of the best. The music was drawn from the diverse catalogs associated with Verve and Blue Note, including Capitol, Decca, EmArcy, Impulse!, Mercury, MGM, Pacific Jazz, Roost and Roulette. The compilations were

selected and sequenced by such veteran jazz figures as Michael Cuscuna, Tom Evered, Dan Morganstern and Richard Seidel. Liner notes for each album in the series were written by noteworthy editors, authors and journalists including Peter Keepnews, Arnold Laubich, Brian Priestley, Robert Pruter, Peter Pullman, Doug Ramsey and Chris Sheridan.

Verve and Blue Note will each issue seven Definitive Series CDs. Verve's definitive samplings focus on the careers of Clifford Brown, Stan Getz, Joe Henderson, George Shearing, Sarah Vaughan, Dinah Washington and Joe Williams. Blue Note will release definitive recordings by Cannonball Adderley, Chet Baker, Nat "King" Cole, Bud Powell, Jimmy Smith, Art Tatum and McCoy Tyner.

VERVE RELEASES:

2 The Definitive Clifford Brown

Trumpeter Clifford Brown died tragically at the age of 25 in a car accident in 1956, four short years after he made his first jazz recordings. With his fat, warm tone and his mastery of bop, Brown quickly became a jazz giant, and his singular sound continues to influence trumpeters today. Liner notes writer Donald Elfman points out that Brownie "created a place for himself in jazz history by combining technical wizardry with love of melody and a sense of musical architecture and logic." He adds, "Every phrase sounded at one and the same time truly improvised and logically constructed. His ever-present sense of melody was the foundation for all that he spontaneously created. His sweetness and warmth informed every note, turning his solos into bursts of

joyous, optimistic spirit."

Brown's earliest recordings were on Blue Note, sampled on this CD with his 1953 jazz recording debut performing the lyrical "Easy Living" and his soaring solo through "Wee Dot" on a live Art Blakey date at Birdland. His best work came in the company of drummer Max Roach on their EmArcy recordings, which included saxophonists Harold Land and later Sonny Rollins.

The Definitive Clifford Brown also captures the trumpeter's performances with vocalists Dinah Washington, Helen Merrill and Sarah Vaughan. Highlights of the collection include a lush string rendition of "Stardust" and the swinging "Joy Spring," featuring Brownie's flowing solo.

3 The Definitive Stan Getz

Tenor saxophonist Stan Getz had his share of hit recordings throughout his career, beginning with the wistful ballad "Early Autumn" while a member of Woody Herman's band in 1948. He duplicated the magic a few years later on his own with "Moonlight," making him a jazz star. Other career highlights include his spirited solo on the swinging "Tour's End" as a guest of Oscar Peterson and his trio in 1957, the mysterious and joyful orchestral number "Once Upon

a Time" from the 1961 seven-part suite Focus and an ebullient duet of "Night and Day" in 1991 with pianist Kenny Barron, recorded shortly before the tenor's death. Also included are Getz's two mammoth 1963 bossa nova hits with João Gilberto and Antonio Carlos Jobim: "Desafinado" and "The Girl from Ipanema."

The Definitive Stan Getz collects his best recordings over his four-decade career. Liner notes writer Doug Ramsey points out that Getz was a great melodicist on his tenor saxophone: "[He] was one of those rare musicians with a direct line from their minds to their fingers..He was a superb interpreter of songs that were written by others and, as one of the most accomplished

improvisers in jazz, he spontaneously created melodic lines that often rivaled or surpassed those of the songs themselves. His tone, full and sensual, was a key element in making him one of the most popular jazz artists of his time."

4 The Definitive Joe Henderson

A distinctive-voiced tenor saxophonist, Joe Henderson was both a relative late-comer to New York's classic jazz scene (1962) and to stardom (popular appreciation of his immense talents did not come until the '90s). At home playing straight-ahead jazz, blues, avant garde and bossa nova, Henderson recorded for Blue Note from 1963-66 and-after a decade recording a number of

impressive albums for Milestone and another nine years freelancing-returned to the label in 1985 for his live Village Vanguard recording The State of the Tenor. It has been generally regarded as Joe's "comeback," even though he had been continuously working. However, his greatest fame came in the '90s after he signed with Verve and released several superb CDs, including tributes to

Billy Strayhorn, Antonio Carlos Jobim and Miles Davis.

The Definitive Joe Henderson captures the tenor saxophonist in his early recording career with the Latin-tinged lead-off number "Recorda Me" (1963) and the spirited "Inner Urge" (1964), both his own compositions. From The State of the Tenor is his imaginative rendition of Sam Rivers' "Beatrice." The collection also features selections from the tenor saxophonist's four Verve albums, including his compelling solo version of "Lush Life" and the rousing big band number "Without a Song." Commenting on Henderson's playing, liner notes writer Peter Keepnews says, .[A]lthough he had an impressive arsenal of squeals, honks, staccato bursts, and sinuous trills, what made his playing truly special was his sense of melodic structure: Even at their most ferocious and unfettered, his improvisations always had a clearly defined beginning, middle, and end."

The Definitive George Shearing

London-born pianist George Shearing has enjoyed one of the longest recording careers of jazz musicians. He moved from England to the U.S. in the late forties and in 1949 developed his famous quintet, comprising a vibraphonist, guitarist, drummer and bassist. His cool and vibrant style of playing became popular during the fifties. Liner notes writer Brian Priestley notes that

he played piano with a "parallel-motion 'locked hands' approach." He adds that Shearing "played attractive standard songs in that distinctive voicing, but with the vibraphone doubling the top note of his right-hand chords and the guitar at the same pitch as his left hand."

Shearing's first popularity came with his 1949 quintet recording of "September in the Rain" and continued with a gorgeous solo take on "Tenderly" in 1950. Also included on The Definitive George Shearing is his spirited 1952 performance of his classic composition "Lullaby of Birdland" and a fine Latin-spiced rendition in 1957 of Horace Silver's "Señor Blues." The collection concludes with his 1962 touching version of "Over the Rainbow" with young vibraphonist Gary Burton. Notes Priestley, "Heard superficially, the signature sound can seem rather homogenized, yet Shearing's arrangements make significant play with dynamics and use subtleties of timing, voicing, and reharmonization."

5 The Definitive Sarah Vaughan

Heralded as one of the 20th century's greatest singers, Sarah Vaughan had a wide range (four octaves), great musicianship (she sang bebop tunes with the improvisational quality of a horn) and durability (she graced the jazz world with her instrument for five decades). In the words of critic Martin Williams, Vaughan "undertook . a challenging musical adventure each time she

sang. [S]he found . an adventure in the most ordinary ditty as well as in the best of our popular songs."

The Definitive Sarah Vaughan samples the most important decades of her career, beginning with her 1949 duet of "Dedicated to You" with Billy Eckstine and concluding in 1967 with a ballad-to-swing take on the Richard Rodgers number "The Sweetest Sounds." Every track is a gem, with special highlights including Vaughan's graceful, scatting spin through "Lullaby of Birdland" (with Clifford Brown on trumpet) in 1954 and a sumptuous, strings-filled version of "Misty" with the Quincy Jones Orchestra in 1958. Liner notes writer Doug Ramsey concludes, "Through it all, we hear Vaughan's incomparable phrasing, vocal control, and taste. We hear her taking chances

and enjoying the rewards of her adventurousness. And, always, we hear the richness, sweep, and drama of her voice, which throughout her life retained every aspect of its glory."

6 The Definitive Dinah Washington

One of the great singers of the forties and fifties, Dinah Washington had fans on the blues circuit early in her career and later caught fire with the r&b and jazz crowds. With her alluring high-pitched voice, she was a hitmaker at ease in crossing over from r&b to pop music. Liner notes writer Robert Pruter comments: "What allowed Washington to appeal to such disparate

audiences, and in truth gave her many careers, was her musical ability. She was a distinctive stylist with a strong vocal identity - a tart timbre that could sound sassy and bittersweet, and sometimes poignant. She transformed every kind of song that she touched - pop standards, blues, and jazz - and made them identifiably hers."

The Definitive Dinah Washington covers the scope of her entire career, beginning with her bouncy 1943 12-bar blues hit "Evil Gal Blues" (written by jazz scribe Leonard Feather) and concluding with 1962 recordings for the Roulette label (shortly before she died). Highlights include her 1949 r&b hit "New Blowtop Blues," her 1954 swinging seven-minute rendition of the Gershwin

tune "A Foggy Day" (which garnered her a jazz audience), her blues-drenched rendition of Hank Snow's country hit "I Don't Hurt Anymore," her lush 1959 pop hit "What a Diff'rence a Day Makes" and her 1961 pop-r&b hit duet with Brook Benton, "Baby (You Got What It Takes)," a catchy strings-with-beat beauty.

7 The Definitive Joe Williams

The baritone-voiced Joe Williams sang blues, ballads and standards in a singular fashion. The Definitive Joe Williams liner notes writer Chris Sheridan quotes the vocalist as once telling Tony Bennett, "It's not that you want to sing, it's that you have to sing." Sheridan adds, "This drive made

Williams one of the most popular and expressive singers in all of jazz and a key factor in the success of the renowned big band that Count Basie re-established in the mid-1950s."

Nine tunes in this collection document Williams' time with Basie groups, beginning in 1954. The most famous numbers from that association are featured here, including the bouncing "Every Day I Have the Blues" (which entered the Recording Hall of Fame in 1993), the swinging r&b "All Right, Okay, You Win" and the charged beauty "Goin' to Chicago." There are also several collaborations with trumpeter Harry "Sweets" Ellison, including the gracefully swinging "Alone Together." Other highlights include Williams' 1987 live recording of the buoyant, scat-brimming "Sometimes I'm Happy" and the gorgeous blues-ballad "What Are You Doing New Year's Eve?"

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