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Digitizing the News: Innovation in Online Newspapers (Inside Technology) Paperback – 15 Feb 2005


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Product details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: MIT Press; New Ed edition (15 Feb 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262524392
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262524391
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.5 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,303,258 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"Although approximately one million Americans operated ham radios in the course of the 20th century, very little has been written about this thriving technical culture in our midst. Kristen Haring offers a deeply sympathetic history of this under-appreciated technical community and their role in contributing to American advances in science and technology, especially the electronics industry. In the process she reveals how technical tinkering has defined manhood in the United States and has powerfully constituted 'technical identities' with often utopian, even, at times, revolutionary, notions about the social uses of technology."--Susan Douglas, Catherine Neafie Kellogg Professor of Communication Studies, University of Michigan, and author of *Listening In: Radio and the American Imagination* " Digitizing the News shows how dramatic innovations can unfold from the coevolution of social and technical choices made over several decades. Putting the news online is changing the production, editing, and consumption of news in ways that shape content in significant ways. How different enterprises have made these choices around the Internet and the news has created a variety of paths to the future of electronic news media. Students in the social sciences and humanities, particularly within communication and journalism, will value this book, which illustrates how research on new media can inform, and be informed by, social studies of science and technology." William H. Dutton, Director, Oxford Internet Institute ' Digitizing the News is a rich, nuanced account of the divergent ways that established print media reacted to new digital technologies. Reluctant to relinquish their gatekeeping role and the dominant logic of 'we publish, consumers read,' newspapers were slow to accommodate non-print forms of information delivery. Boczkowski shows how these decisions were shaped by both the politics of newsrooms and differing conceptions of the audience. This lively book deserves attention from students of technology and the media.' Walter W. Powell, Stanford University ' Digitizing the Newsshows how dramatic innovations can unfold from the coevolution of social and technical choices made over several decades. Putting the news online is changing the production, editing, and consumption of news in ways that shape content in significant ways. How different enterprises have made these choices around the Internet and the news has created a variety of paths to the future of electronic news media. Students in the social sciences and humanities, particularly within communication and journalism, will value this book, which illustrates how research on new media can inform, and be informed by, social studies of science and technology.' William H. Dutton, Director, Oxford Internet Institute "In Digitizing the News, Pablo Boczkowski's keen eye for organizational detail, insistence on the importance of history, and rich appreciation for scholarly ideas combine to produce an astute investigation of the way newspapers have confronted the challenge of the World Wide Web." Joseph Turow, Robert Lewis Shayon Professor of Communication, Annenberg School For Communication, University of Pennsylvania "In *Digitizing the News*, Pablo Boczkowski's keen eye for organizational detail, insistence on the importance of history, and rich appreciation for scholarly ideas combine to produce an astute investigation of the way newspapers have confronted the challenge of the world wide web."--Joseph Turow, Robert Lewis Shayon Professor of Communication, Annenberg School For Communication, University of Pennsylvania "*Digitizing the News* is a rich, nuanced account of the divergent ways that established print media reacted to new digital technologies. Reluctant to relinquish their gatekeeping role, and the dominant logic of 'we publish, consumers read,' newspapers were slow to accommodate non-print forms of information delivery. Boczkowski shows how these decisions were shaped by both the politics of newsrooms and differing conceptions of the audience. This lively book deserves attention from students of technology and the media."--Walter W. Powell, Stanford University

About the Author

Pablo J. Boczkowski is Professor and Director of the Program in Media, Technology, and Society at Northwestern University. He is the author of Digitizing the News: Innovation in Online Newspapers (MIT Press) and News at Work: Imitation in an Age of Information Abundance.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Paul J. Bradshaw on 1 Mar 2006
Format: Paperback
One of the best pieces of research into online journalism I've read (with possibly one of the dullest covers).
Boczkowski spent time in the online newsrooms of three newspapers: the New York Times technology section; the Houston Chronicle's Virtual Voyager project; and New Jersey Online's Community Connection inititative. Whether by design or accident, the sample conveniently crosses three different types of online journalism - the transferrence of print to online; experiments in multimedia storytelling; and user-generated content.
Rather than adopt a strictly journalistic theoretical framework, Boczkowski draws on media theory, technology theory, and organisational theory to produce an analysis that steers refreshingly clear of the technological determinism that normally characterises writing on online journalism (e.g. the "citizen journalism will make all journalists redundant" hype).
In conclusion, Boczkowksi questions the assertion of Gieber (1964) that news "is what newspapermen [sic] make it":
"the news in the online environment is what those contributing to its production make it [...] at least two transformations appear to distinguish the production of new-media news from the typical case of print and broadcast media: the news seems to be shaped by a greater and more varied groups of actors, and this places a premium on the practices that coordinate productive activities across these groups. This, in turn, seems to influence the content and form of online news in three ways. The news moves from being mostly journalist-centred, communicated as a monologue, and primarily local, to also being increasingly audience-centred, part of multiple conversations, and micro-local.
"[...] studies of print and broadcast newsrooms ...
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