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Digital Vertigo: How Today's Online Social Revolution Is Dividing, Diminishing, and Disorienting Us Paperback – 30 Apr 2013


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Product details

  • Paperback: 246 pages
  • Publisher: Griffin; Reprint edition (30 April 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1250031397
  • ISBN-13: 978-1250031396
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 1.8 x 20.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 941,913 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Andrew Keen is the executive director of the Silicon Valley salon FutureCast, a columnist for CNN and a regular commentator on all things digital. He is the author of DIGITAL VERTIGO, the international sensation THE CULT OF THE AMATEUR, which was published in seventeen languages, and the controversial new THE INTERNET IS NOT THE ANSWER.

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Review

"Unlike most commentators, Andrew Keen observes the internet as if from a distance. "Digital Vertigo" may be one of the few books on the subject that, twenty years from now, will be seen to have got it right. Neither blinkered advocate nor hardened cynic, he identifies the good and the bad with a rare human and historical perspective. "--Sir Martin Sorrell, CEO, WPP "Andrew Keen has found the off switch for Silicon Valley's reality distortion field. With a cold eye and a cutting wit, he reveals the grandiose claims of our new digital plutocrats to be little more than self-serving cant. "Digital Vertigo" provides a timely and welcome reminder that having substance is more important than being transparent."--Nicholas Carr, author of "The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains""Andrew Keen is that rarest of authors: one has taken the time to understand the benefits of technological innovation before warning us of its risks. In "Digital Vertigo" Keen finds himself in a dizzying world where it is not just possible to share every detail of our professional and private lives, but actually expected. While a growing number of his friends -- including those in the upper echelons of Silicon Valley society -- preach the gospel of total transparency and cyber-oversharing, he refuses to blindly click the "accept" button. Instead he takes us on a guided tour of the history of privacy, solitude and the technology of socialization -- before encouraging us to take a long, hard look at our lives before we blindly allow others to do the same. A vital and timely book that's terrifying, fascinating, persuasive and reassuring all at the same time. And one that will make even the biggest Facebook-o-phile or Linked-in-a-holic think twice before adding another contact to their network."--Paul Carr, author of "Bringing Nothing to the Party "and "The Upgrade""A bracing read. From Hitchcock to Mark Zuckerberg and the politics of privacy, a savvy observer of contemporary --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

Why Social media - Facebook, LinkedIn, Groupon, Twitter - is bad for you. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Barry on 4 May 2013
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One of the very few books I have reread.

Andrew Keen's book is a brilliant critique of social networking as we know it.

Keen did his research - be that it looking back to ancient philosophers, the history of computing, social change in the US and globally - and has managed to explain much of what has happened.

The book is interesting in that he builds it (1) around his interactions at a conference in Oxford, with a number of the 'leading lights' of social networking and (2) the characters of Alfred Hitchcock's movie, 'Vertigo'. He quotes widely from those who promote the benefits of social networking and those, like himself, who doubt its real value.

He does not mince his words (P118) - 'you see, social media has been so ubiquitous, so much the connective tissue of society that we've all become like Scottie Ferguson, victims of a creepy story that we neither understand nor control...It's a postindustrial truth of increasingly weak community and a rampant individualism of super-nodes and super-connectors'.

The references alone could tie you up for weeks. But I believe he has done all of us a service in highlighting what's wrong with much of what is being put over as good for society. Well worth taking the time to read.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By philosopher2 on 9 Jun. 2012
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This is an absolutely outstanding book that carefully outlines the debate that should be taking place about what is acceptable use of personal information and what disclosuree should be (properly) made. Most 'participants' in social media and users of the Internet and smartphones clearly have no idea how much information they are providing to so called 'free' service providers and the vast fortunes that are being made with their personal information by those providers. Andrew Keen stands apart from the 'crowd' of enthusiastic commentators on social media in that he actually thinks independently about what is going on and is not afraid to voice his views and concerns.

In my opinion, it is not being over-dramatic to say that every one of us should read this seminal book before it is too late.
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Couple of years ago Adnrew Keen has published "The cult of amateur" probably one of the first books in what eventually happened to become a trend urging very skeptical approach to internet as social, cultural and media phenomenon. While reading Vertigo I've found it very hard not to compare it with "The cult...", and the duel leaves Vertigo defeated. "The cult..." was a very straightforward book offering Keen's thoughts on how internet is having negative impact on modern culture backed with practical examples. It read almost like a school textbook with ideas presented in a an orderly and disciplined manner, which I guess one can take as showing respect for the reader on one hand, and an objective measure of the strength of authors' reasoning on the other. In Vertigo, Keen ventures into almost mystical journey to the unchartered territories of internet impacting social live and is focusing on social media impact this time. If The cult however was more a report on the issues, Vertigo is much closer to philosophical essay. This does not necessary have to be a weakness, might strength for some readers, but to me the book lost its edge. It's more like personal diary, making the story possibly more involving for some, but it is missing more universal message backed with hard data that "the cult" brought about. My advice: take "The cult of amateur" first and consider "Vertigo" as an option for a dessert.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Edna on 3 Nov. 2013
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This book offers a great view on digital revolution and where it's heading.
I haven't finished reading it but I am enjoying it. It's a great and useful read for anyone interested in digital media.
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