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Digital Rights Management: Business and Technology (Professional Mindware) Paperback – 1 Nov 2001


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Product details

  • Paperback: 316 pages
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons; 1 edition (1 Nov. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0764548891
  • ISBN-13: 978-0764548895
  • Product Dimensions: 18.8 x 1.9 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,270,723 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

an excellent job...they take a tough subject and make it entertaining a must have for anyone interested in securing their assets (Internet Strategist, November 2003)

From the Back Cover

"This book paints a complete picture of the overall DRM landscape in terms that novices can understand, without sacrificing the under–the–hood details that techies demand." ––Mark Walter, Senior Analyst, The Seybold Report

Protect Your Intellectual Property –– and Profit from Digital Media
Digital rights management, or DRM, is a set of business models and technologies that enables you to protect –– and profit from –– your text, image, music, or video content in today′s digital world. In this unique guide, three digital media experts show you step–by–step how to find the right DRM solution for your organization, whether you′re an IT decision–maker or an executive on the content side. After explaining DRM antecedents, paradigms, and legal foundations, the authors walk you through today′s DRM technologies and standards –– and offer sound, practical advice on how to match your needs with the right DRM products, services, and vendors.

Your Road Map for Today′s DRM Technologies
∗ Get the scoop on subscription, pay–per–view, superdistribution, metering, and other DRM business models
∗ Understand what the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and other legal guidelines mean for DRM
∗ Delve into watermarking, encryption, authentication, clearinghouses, and other DRM building blocks
∗ Get up to speed on XrML, DOI, ICE, and other emerging standards
∗ Zero in on key proprietary technologies, from InterTrust RightsSystem to Verance watermarking to products from Adobe, Microsoft, and many others
∗ Match your needs with the right DRM solutions –– from custom–built systems to the best vendors and industry–specific products.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
In this chapter, we take a look at the ways that rights to content have been managed - or not managed - before the advent of technologies such as digital media formats and the Internet. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 Mar. 2002
Format: Paperback
This is a book that a whole industry has been waiting to see and Rosenblatt, Trippe and Mooney have prepared a seemingly comprehensive cover of this strategically important and currently under-regarded field. Covering everything from Origins to Opportunities, standards, business models and technology a book of this type should provide a one stop reference to anyone whose business pivots on the dissemination of intellectual property over networks, be it text, music, video or software.
However closer reading leaves the uneasy feeling that one has when one finds that parts of the material that one is familiar with are inaccurate or incompletely research, casting doubts on the chapters which one is not equipped to judge.
The authors tread on thin ice in their discussion of encryption and through poor understanding to the relative strengths of cryptographic systems present cryptographic systems as a rather more level playing field than is actually the case. In particular they seriously underestimate the algorithmic strength of the longer key-length versions of the US Advanced Encryption Standard and overplay the chances that open systems of this sort - ones that have been studied publicly for several years by the world leading cryptographers - will have secret trapdoors known only to governments and overlooked by cryptographers. Even their peculiar interpretation of the US Advanced Encryption Standard's original name, Rijndael, suggest that they have nor studied the literature first hand. On the other hand Kerckhoff's axiom seems to be unknown to them and they do not focus on the serious technical problems of protecting digital content once the keys have been made available to unlock the content.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Still waiting for DRM to be explained. 11 Nov. 2002
By Simon A. Robins - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The problem with the several texts available on digital copyright or Digital Rights Management is that the topic demands a treatment from at least three different perspectives: namely legal, technical and business. There are several books that try to tackle the topic of digital copyright from a legal viewpoint, and this one is clearly coming from a technical perspective. Legal issues are covered, but rather superficially. More surprisingly the crucial business issues and models that are driving interest in DRM are barely mentioned and there is no dicussion of the business models that are working and those that are not. Disappointingly many of the technical issues are also fudged in a way that will leave non-technical audiences confused, and those who are following technical developments frustrated. The fact is that, technically at least, DRM is an area where approaches, technologies and standards are all in rapid development and the industry has failed to converge on any single direction. This book's effort to offer a comprehensive review of available products means that it risked redundancy before it was published, as many of the companies and technologies have ceased to be relevant. What the world still needs is a book on DRM that reviews the law, discusses the business models (and consumer needs) that are driving developments, and describes fundamental approaches in a way that will remain relevant whatever product Microsoft may impose on us all next year. Unfortunately this book intrigues enough to encourage one to want to know more about DRM, but never really provides the answers.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
A good attempt at explaining a difficult topic 12 April 2003
By frumiousb - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As noted below, DRM consists of legal, technical and business issues and anyone trying to provide an overview of all three has their work cut out for them. Particularly in the early chapters of the book, these authors give it a good try.
Unfortunately, the biggest problem with the book is that they try to treat the technology standards and products available on the market, and the market is just changing too quickly for that to be for more than just a superficial look. Too much of what they discuss is already outdated, out-of-business, merged with other offerings or otherwise defunct. Not the fault of the authors, just the nature of the DRM market.
This book is:
Not a good read if you already understand the basic issues and hope to get more insight into the technology-- go to the web for that.
Absolutely a good read if you want to become familiar in a basic way in the underlying issues. Part 1 of the book is really useful reading even to help people who are pretty familiar with the topic structure their thinking.
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
By far the best treatment of DRM I've ever run across 5 April 2002
By David Sidman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
DRM is a confusing topic, and this one of the clearest expositions of DRM (or most any other technical topic!) that I've ever run across. It demystifies a complex subject with simple straightforward language, describes key vendors and organizes them accurately into categories, and even contains a wealth of useful materials such as checklists to help the customer determine business/technical requirements, evaluate vendors, etc.
A must-have for any publisher, intellectual property lawyer, venture capitalist, technology vendor, or consulting firm dealing with digital content distribution or online intellectual property.
4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Great reference 8 April 2002
By Jake DiMare - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In an ever changing business landscape, I find nothing more comforting than relevant information. As an web application developer I used to always have questions about legality and DRM that nobody could answer. This book has a permananent spot on my shelf!
6 of 11 people found the following review helpful
This is a book that a whole industry has been waiting to see 22 Mar. 2002
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a book that a whole industry has been waiting to see and Rosenblatt, Trippe and Mooney have prepared a seemingly comprehensive cover of this strategically important and currently under-regarded field. Covering everything from Origins to Opportunities, standards, business models and technology a book of this type should provide a one stop reference to anyone whose business pivots on the dissemination of intellectual property over networks, be it text, music, video or software.
However closer reading leaves the uneasy feeling that one has when one finds that parts of the material that one is familiar with are inaccurate or incompletely research, casting doubts on the chapters which one is not equipped to judge.
The authors tread on thin ice in their discussion of encryption and through poor understanding to the relative strengths of cryptographic systems present cryptographic systems as a rather more level playing field than is actually the case. In particular they seriously underestimate the algorithmic strength of the longer key-length versions of the US Advanced Encryption Standard and overplay the chances that open systems of this sort - ones that have been studied publicly for several years by the world leading cryptographers - will have secret trapdoors known only to governments and overlooked by cryptographers. Even their peculiar interpretation of the US Advanced Encryption Standard's original name, Rijndael, suggest that they have nor studied the literature first hand. On the other hand Kerckhoff's axiom seems to be unknown to them and they do not focus on the serious technical problems of protecting digital content once the keys have been made available to unlock the content.
Watermarks within encrypted files have been in use since 1999 in systems such as Perimele's bespoke systems and DITSS information security products. Rendering and decryption applications which do not need a stand alone application or plug-in are indeed a holy grail for the reasons that the authors have outlined and as the authors indicate do change the very nature to the business case - but far from being impossible at present these have been in widespread use since 1997 in a range of products in the Pay2See family of solutions.
There is still excellent material on Technology standards although the authors do not seem to be aware of the demise of XMCL and rise of MPEG-21. All in all a good read and well worth skimming if you are in the business but certainly not enough reliable information to make informed decision from and by no means the definitive guide that it purports to be...
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