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Digital Fortress Hardcover – 1 Aug 2005


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Press; New edition edition (1 Aug. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0593055063
  • ISBN-13: 978-0593055069
  • Product Dimensions: 16.4 x 3.3 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (517 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 193,525 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Dan Brown is the bestselling author of Digital Fortress, Deception Point, Angels and Demons, The Da Vinci Code and The Lost Symbol. He is a graduate of Amherst College and Phillips Exeter Academy, where he has taught English and creative writing. He lives in New England. Visit his UK website at www.danbrownofficial.co.uk.

Product Description

Review

"'Engaged me instantly...keeps up a cracking pace as the mystery deepens and disaster follows disaster' The Times; 'Fast paced with plenty pf twists and turns...the reader remains gripped, trying to guess where its going next...one of the best thrillers on the bookstands. Don't miss it' Sunday Express; 'Pure genius...Dan Brown has to be one of the best, smartest, and most accomplished writers in the country' Nelson Demille; 'Wow...Blockbuster perfection. An exhilaratingly brainy thriller' The New York Times; 'A new master of smart thrills...A pulse-quickening, brain-teasing adventure' People Magazine"

Book Description

The bestselling novel. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jay on 2 Jan. 2007
Format: Paperback
I felt it started strongly with good character introductions and building people's backgrounds and reader affinity with them. There's plenty of action and some great events which are (to those who've already read Brown) now-familiar action capers with some fast changes and lots of near-misses. Plenty of fun there and it keeps you hooked.

The bit where it fell down for me was the ending, where I felt he had one eye on the action-adventure Hollywood adaption. It just seemed a bit too formulaic and there wasn't the depth. You could see what was coming - and the main bit of world-saving 'brilliance' of a genius codebreaker, well, I got it straight away, and the NSA don't want me!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. Mazumder on 24 Oct. 2004
Format: Paperback
'Digital Fortress' is Dan Brown's first book, and it happens to be the last one of his that I've read. It's clear to see that he got better the more he wrote, particularly with 'Angels and Demons' and the 'Da Vinci Code'. But that's not to say that Digital Fortress isn't enjoyable.
In this novel we follow Susan Fletcher, who is the NSA's leading cryptologist, and the whole book takes place inside just one day. In it, Fletcher is taken through a whirlwind of conspiracies and secrets involving the US government's intelligence, in particular their ability to read anyone's email. The adventure is business and personal for Fletcher, as her fiancee is brought into the equation as well. This all makes for an entertaining read. So, certainly worth looking at, but by far Dan Brown's best.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 8 April 2005
Format: Paperback
When Dan Brown wrote the Da Vinci code he had had three previous books as 'practice'. This is his first book and it shows. The plot is reasonable, but nothing like as compelling or page turning as say Angels and Demons. The characters are skeletal versions of characters in subsequent books and I read through it with a nagging feeling that all the jargon and constant reminders of just how brilliant the main characters are was merely covering a lack of substance and real interesting ideas. There are the charactaristic Dan Brown twists but little else.
About twenty pages before the end I began to wonder "is this it or is he saving the best for the final few pages. It was, and he wasn't.
Disappointing.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 25 Feb. 2006
Format: Paperback
After reading DaVinci Code and accepting it for what it is (a story, not a 100% factually correct account) I ordered Digital Fortress.
A collegue at work warned me that reading these books "the wrong way round" would be dissapointing, and he was unfortunately correct.
Both have an American academic jaunting across Europe like a CIA field agent, in search of something they do not fully comprehend while some sinister world organisation (in one, the NSA, in the other the Church) pull the puppet's strings. And both have a physically impaired assassin out to hamper the whole thing.
The characterisation is shallow, such as the depiction of the NSA workers by phrases like "...he knew she was right; Ms X's instincts were infamous for always being right..." which doesn't create any reader empathy - in fact it makes you wonder how they didn't avoid the whole crisis in the first place it they were all so perfect!
I think Dan Brown has a random plot generator:
<insert main charachter's name> is an academic with language skills, sent to <insert European city> by <insert world organisation> to look for <insert mythological artifact or technological breakthrough>. However, <insert name of main character's oldest trusted friend> has other ideas and has sent <insert assasin with single physical perculiarity> to muck it all up. In the end though, the assasin is despatched and the hero returns home while his friend is exposed and probably killed.
No wonder DVC was a best seller, he'd had a few practice attempts beforehand...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By SocialBookshelves.com on 2 Nov. 2013
Format: Paperback
I'm no great fan of Dan Brown, because he's not as crazy as most of the writers that I like to read - he's like the pop music version of Stephen King, and I don't even read too much Stephen King. It's too contemporary for me, but I give it a go every now and then.

And Brown isn't a terrible writer - he's more than capable, and that's almost part of the problem. It's convincing enough, it just feels uninspired - it's the alcohol-free beer of the book world, and I'm not sure whether that's a compliment or not. And to make matters worse, Digital Fortress is hardly his greatest novel.

That said, the subject matter should appeal to me - it's been described as a "technothriller", and it's almost a subtle parody of the real-life history of cryptography, a subject that I find fascinating and baffling at the same time. Brown's novel follows cryptographer Susan Fletcher as she attempts to crack a complex new code that threatens national security.

In many ways, it's typical of all of Brown's other work - you'll notice, after reading a couple of novels, that they all follow a formula. That's probably because he was formerly a lecturer in creative writing, and they always say that you need to know the rules before you break them - unfortunately, Brown never breaks them.

Still, Digital Fortress is far from the worst book that I've ever read, and it's definitely worth reading if you've read Dan Brown's work before and enjoyed it. However, don't read this before reading Angels & Demons, The Da Vinci Code and The Lost Symbol - they're better-known for a reason. They're better.

It's interesting to note, though, that some of the topics that the book covers are even more relevant in this modern world than they were back in 1998, when the book was first published.
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