Did Muhammad Exist?: An Inquiry into Islam's Obscure Origins and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Did Muhammad Exist?: An I... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by ShineWood
Condition: Used: Like New
Trade in your item
Get a £2.75
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Did Muhammad Exist?: An Inquiry into Islam's Obscure Origins Hardcover – 15 Apr 2012

28 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£24.50
£16.08 £16.64
£24.50 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Did Muhammad Exist?: An Inquiry into Islam's Obscure Origins + The Truth About Muhammad: Founder of the World's Most Intolerant Religion + Complete Infidel's Guide to the Koran
Price For All Three: £46.93

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £2.75
Trade in Did Muhammad Exist?: An Inquiry into Islam's Obscure Origins for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £2.75, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: ISI Books (15 April 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 161017061X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1610170611
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3.8 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 363,442 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

A super detective service for the West . . . Spencer leaves few rocks unturned in his search for the truth about Islam and Muhammad. "Capitalism Magazine""

About the Author

Robert Spencer is the author of several critically acclaimed books about Islam, including the "New York Times" bestsellers "The Truth about Muhammad" and "The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam (and the Crusades)." He is a columnist for "FrontPage Magazine" and the director of Jihad Watch, a program of the David Horowitz Freedom Center. Spencer holds a master s degree in religious studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and has been studying Islamic theology, law, and history in depth for more than three decades."

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Lord on 31 Mar. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
There are some obvious problems with this study from an academic point of view. It seems that the author doesn't read Arabic, so all the references are to secondary sources; but even so, the arguments are well controlled and well organised. It deals with a very important subject and provides a fresh, interesting perspective; and apart from the polemical content, it presents a lot of facts about the history of Islam. It might be argued that it is all filtered through a biased original position: but compare that with the vast pile of works biased in the other direction, written by Muslims or Muslim apologists, and one can forgive this evident bias, as the author has taken care to justify his positions and offer evidence. As he is not really an Arabist, some of these positions will be open to reasonable criticism, but that is a good thing, and I hope there will be some kind of debate. Few of the hostile reviews I have read really address the points made; but also it must be said that most of the friendly reviews are from people who just like the general idea of the book without considering that there are arguments to the contrary. The ideal thing would be for Muslims to read it and answer its arguments: but to be fair, this would almost mean that they would have to stop being Muslims, as the book clearly suggests that some of their core beliefs are false.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I would recommend reading this along with Tom Hollands brilliant "In The Shadow Of The Sword: The Battle for Global Empire and the End of the Ancient World " and "What the Modern Martyr Should Know: Seventy-Two Grapes and Not a Single Virgin: The New Picture of Islam by Norbert G. Pressburg (this is based on "Syro-Aramaic Reading of the Koran: A Contribution to the Decoding of the Language of the Koran by Christopher Luxenberg" which like most such "Incendiary" academic textual analysis is eye wateringly expensive.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By F. Parsons on 4 Feb. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is one thought provoking book. Exceptionally we'll researched and equally we'll reasoned. You will, having read this book, really question whether the Islamic traditions ( ahadith) contain any element of truth at all! A revealing and informative read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Dynamo on 22 July 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book challenges the accepted account of Muhammad's life, and in doing so challenges traditional views regarding the origins of Islam.
This exercise is unlikely to enhance Mr Spencer's popularity in some quarters.
However, it seems reasonable to question the accepted account in which:
1. There is a single deity [Allah].
2. In paradise, there exists a perfect book [Quran].
3. This book is written in Arabic.
4. In the early 7th century, Allah sent the Archangel Gabriel to reveal the Quran to an Arab called Muhammad.
5. Thus, Muhammad became the final prophet of the true faith [Islam].
People who believe all this are - by definition - Muslims.
But, if you're not a Muslim, then presumably you reject one or more of the points listed above.
It's certainly odd that non-Muslims find themselves able to reject these central assertions made by Muslims, but fail to question more trivial aspects of the received biography of Muhammed.
To put this another way:
If Muslims are mistaken in believing that the Archangel Gabriel visited Muhammed, might they not also be mistaken about some of the other things they believe that Muhammed said and did?
Having considered the arguments in Mr Spencer's book, it seems to me that he asks and then answers an irrelevant question. Muhammed may have 'existed' - in the sense that Muslim scriptures may describe events in the life of a historical person or persons. But, if one believes that these accounts are wrong in their most important assertions, they may also be wrong in any number of other details.
If there was a religious leader in 7th century Arabia, but he did not receive the Quran via divine revalation, and if some of the stories about him are false, is this person Muhammed? And does it matter?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Rich Wiltshir on 28 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I'm looking for evidence of these principal characters, like Muhammad, Jesus, Moses et al and nothing's surfaced to convince me either existed or merits their religions being respected, applauded, privileged in a caring society that seeks peace. That's why I bought this book and will continue to invest in others. The work of people like Spencer and others mentioned herein is important: it's somewhat disappointing that followers of these religions / sects / denominations / cults don't realise that honest endeavour to expose data and argument will certainly reveal any substance that is foundational to their belief. Or maybe psychology drives overreaction?

What would you expect of a barely literate culture that was host to a man-cum-conduit? I'd anticipate his fame and repute to be wide, that non-compliants and impersonators would be punished with vigour and publicity, that Muhammed (or any similarly "chosen one") would be equipped with an incorruptible means of replicating the message to be shared. But, if ...
To me - though I've not researched this history - it seems that a much abused, frequently belittled community found a huge and unlikely victory over the embers of once great empires: a victory so wide and long-lasting that the conquered peoples' culture was redrawn just as were the laws and borders.

Why would I, an antitheist, seek evidence of these figures in history?

At times, this book has a vague sense of being a contest between two progeny of Abrahamic religion. Spencer, irrespective of anyone's view of his motives, delivers a clear catalogue of today's claims of Islam measured against its footprints in history.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback