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A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition (Oxford Paperback Reference) [Paperback]

David A. Bender
3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

29 Jan 2009 Oxford Paperback Reference
This leading dictionary contains over 6,150 entries covering all aspects of food and nutrition, diet and health. Jargon-free definitions make this a valuable dictionary that clearly explains even the most technical of nutritional terms. From absinthe to zymogens, it covers types of food (including everyday foods and little-known foods, e.g. payusnaya), nutritional information, vitamins, minerals, and key scientific areas including metabolism and genomics. This new and fully revised edition features many entry-level web links, updated and conveniently accessible via the Dictionary of Food and Nutrition companion website, providing relevant extra information. Expanded appendices contain a wealth of useful material, including Recommended Daily Allowance lists. An essential A-Z for nutritionists, food manufacturers, caterers, health-care students, food science/technology students, and anyone who has an interest in, or enjoys, food and wants to find out more about what they eat.


Product details

  • Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; 3 edition (29 Jan 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199234876
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199234875
  • Product Dimensions: 2.6 x 13.3 x 19.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 511,698 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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About the Author

David A. Bender is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, at University College London.

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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
3.3 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Probably the worst Oxford dictionary ever 22 Nov 2009
Format:Paperback
Oxford Dictionary of Food and Nutrition is probably the worst dictionary ever to come from Oxford University Press. In its second edition (2005) there was scarcely a page without a mistake and in its third edition (2009) there are still plenty of them: from misspelled entries and wrong definitions to the chaotic use of capitalization!

The author failed to correctly spell even the simplest foreign words which can be checked in every ordinary dictionary. For example: in the second edition he was trying to convince the readers, that the Roman word for starch was amulum*. Well, everybody who has some knowledge of the Latin language, and has ever heard for any of a flock of words beginning with amyl-, knows that the word was amylum. In the third edition this mistake is corrected, but tens of others, like the Italian word focaccia for a flat cake, which is misspelled foccacia*, are not.

Some of the mistakes from previous edition were 'corrected' in a very funny (i.e. not serious!) way. Example: a kind of Russian dumplings is called tvorozhniki, but the author invented(?) the spelling tvoroinki*, which is still an entry (now with the correct one in brackets) despite the fact, that as far as I know it exists in Oxford Dictionary of Food and Nutrition only.

Another 'gem' are definitions like that of nioigome: "perfumed rice". The dictionary does not tell us neither whose it is (probably Japanese) nor what exactly does it mean (perfumed with what?).

Besides, the author plays at hide-and-seek much too often for a decent dictionary. For example: 1) at soonf he says "see fennel", but at fennel there is no mention of soonf; 2) at soondth he says "see ginger", but at ginger there is no mention of soondth.

My advice is: avoid this dictionary! Alan Davidson's The Oxford Companion to Food is incomparably better choise (though it lacks information on nutrition).
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Informative but very academic, and traditional 7 Dec 2003
By Greg M
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I expected this book to be more of nutrition data book, but unfortunately it was not. As the title of this book said that it is a dictionary of food. If you are a teacher of home economics, you might need this, but otherwise , a little bit boring.
But it is informative, if you love to read cooking books and find some words which you do not know often, this is the book to have with you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very useful Study aid 23 Mar 2011
By Mrs. Gail Brewster VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is a comprehensive study aid useful for any student studying food nutrition and health. It is well laid out with all the pertinent information just like a regular dictionary.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Nutrition 22 Jan 2013
By Mr. D. Brown - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Very informative, but I was expecting more on the nutritional values of individual foodstuffs: calorific values, fat and carbohydrate content, vitamin values etc
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Probably the worst Oxford dictionary ever 24 Nov 2009
By reader from Encyclopedialand - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Oxford Dictionary of Food and Nutrition is probably the worst dictionary ever to come from Oxford University Press. In its second edition (2005) there was scarcely a page without a mistake and in its third edition (2009) there are still plenty of them: from misspelled entries and wrong definitions to the chaotic use of capitalization!

The author failed to correctly spell even the simplest foreign words which can be checked in every ordinary dictionary. For example: in the second edition he was trying to convince the readers, that the Roman word for starch was amulum*. Well, everybody who has some knowledge of the Latin language, and has ever heard for any of a flock of words beginning with amyl-, knows that the word was amylum. In the third edition this mistake is corrected, but tens of others, like the Italian word focaccia for a flat cake, which is misspelled foccacia*, are not.

Some of the mistakes from previous edition were 'corrected' in a very funny (i.e. not serious!) way. Example: a kind of Russian dumplings is called tvorozhniki, but the author invented(?) the spelling tvoroinki*, which is still an entry (now with the correct one in brackets) despite the fact, that as far as I know it exists in Oxford Dictionary of Food and Nutrition only.

Another 'gem' are definitions like that of nioigome: "perfumed rice". The dictionary does not tell us neither whose it is (probably Japanese) nor what exactly does it mean (perfumed with what?).

Besides, the author plays at hide-and-seek much too often for a decent dictionary. For example: 1) at soonf he says "see fennel", but at fennel there is no mention of soonf; 2) at soondth he says "see ginger", but at ginger there is no mention of soondth.

My advice is: avoid this dictionary! Alan Davidson's The Oxford Companion to Food is incomparably better choise (though it lacks information on nutrition).
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth Buying 12 Jun 2009
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The book is a little outdated, but the information inside it great. It is reader friendly and easy to find what you are looking for. I am studying to be a nutritionist and I have used this book many times. Every house should have one of these books on their bookshelf.
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Special Reference Book 13 Jan 2007
By The Vet - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
If you are a foodie and you like to know some of the finer details, this is for you. Not a dictionary; more a trivia collection. But not really trivia as the info is solid and useful.
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