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Dictionary of Ecclesiastical Latin Hardcover – 1 May 1995

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Dictionary of Ecclesiastical Latin + A Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin + An Answer Key to a Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin: A Supplement to the Text by John F. Collins
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Hendrickson Publishers (1 May 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565631315
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565631311
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 15.9 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 289,953 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"A working knowledge of Latin is important for anyone who wishes to study the nearly two thousand years of living tradition of the Catholic Church. It is essential for those who wish to study seriously the sacred sciences of philosophy, theology, and cannon law. Father Leo Stelten, drawing upon his long experiences in teaching Latin to students for the priesthood, has developed in his "Dictionary of Ecclesiastical Latin" a most helpful tool both for those who are beginning their study of the church's lingua materna, as well as for those who are working to renew and improve their knowledge of church Latin."--Monsignor Raymond L. Burke, Supremum Signaturae Apostolicae Tribunal, Vatican City, Rome

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Peter on 15 Nov. 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The book was delivered promptly, which delighted me, for I was so excited by my other book purchase, a 17th Century Theological Treatise on Our Holy Mother, the contents were all in latin and my normal latin dictionary was of no use.
I could not believe that one could get Ecclesiastical Latin Dictionaries from Amazon, Thank you Amazon.
This means I can now interperate some of the Latin Verse in the book.

Peter Fallon
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Jan. 2005
Format: Hardcover
No dictionary has everything, but I have found this one exceptionally good for modern Latin. Clear presentation, a vocabulary belied by the size of the book, and concise meanings. Of the seven Latin dictionaries on my desk this one is, perhaps, the most used.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By John Barry on 22 Mar. 2010
Format: Hardcover
Excellent value for genealogists who, despite having a knowledge of classical Latin, are faced with unfamiliar Latin words in old documents.
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By Professor V Courtney on 13 Nov. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As described
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 35 reviews
88 of 90 people found the following review helpful
none better 10 Mar. 2002
By Robert W. Flammang - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you want to read the Vulgate and don't have 180 dollars to spend on Lewis & Short, this is the dictionary for you. Neither Cassel's nor the Chambers-Murray nor even the Oxford Latin dictionary will suffice; their vocabularies are restricted to classical authors. This is the best inexpensive Latin-English dictionary I've seen that lists words from after the 5th century AD. It simply has no competition!
49 of 49 people found the following review helpful
Surprisingly useful reference 6 May 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
For a small dictionary this book has proven extremely useful for working on medieval ecclesiastical texts. I picked it up at random and was soon using in preference to the more unwieldy Niermayr (still best for tough terms). DEL is particularly good at giving short definitions that are significantly different from classical usage such as found in Lewis and Short. Highly recommended.
54 of 55 people found the following review helpful
Excellent reference on Vulgate Latin 27 May 2003
By Gary Bisaga - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this dictionary solely for reading the Latin Vulgate, for the on-line Vulgate reading group that I run. Although I have some knowledge of Greek, I wanted a good and easy-to-use resource that provides the Latin translations. This dictionary succeeds admirably, although you should have a decent basic Latin dictionary like Cassell's also. I have never found a word in the Vulgate that was not defined in either Cassell's or this dictionary. Even "problem words" (usually directly transliterated into Latin from Greek) are there - for example, "telonium".
In addition to good word coverage, it also explains idiomatic usages of words, especially with prepositions. Look at the example pages and you'll some examples of idiomatic uses of words with the preposition "ad".
33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
Superb Lexicon 1 May 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is a very fine dictionary for scholarly or ecclesiastical use. Is is useful in working on Church documents and particularly the Vulgate. I highly recommend it for any persons working on Latin texts of an ecclesiastical nature.
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
A handy , useful book 27 Jun. 2006
By John-Allen Payne - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I agree with Ryan R. Grant's review below. It will be easier to use by someone with some familiarity with Latin. On the positive side, it is sturdily bound and neatly formatted with clear print on eye-ease paper--very convenient to use. But one thing that no one has mentioned so far is the accents. Following the practice of ecclesiastical latin, this dictionary uses acute accents to indicate the stressed syllable of each Latin word. This will be a minor annoyance for the user who tries to determine the stress on some verb forms. For example, the present tense of the verb "invénio" appears with the stress on the "e"; But there is no indication of how to determine where the stress falls on the second-person and third-person forms of that verb. On the other hand, in a classical dictionary where long vowels are marked by macrons; the lack of a macron written over the "e" in the verb "invenio" conveniently indicates that the "e" is short and that the stress must recede to the first syllable on those forms "ínvenis" and "ínvenit." Ultimately, the user of this dictionary will need to refer to a classical dictionary for this information.

A minor inconvenience is that I-stem nouns are not marked. There are about fifty of them in use; and although they can now be found on line with a little digging; it would have been convenient to have I-stem nouns indicated in this dictionary.

A third inconvenience is the lack of information regarding the valence of verbs. Not all Latin verbs take accusative objects. Some verbs take dative objects, and other verbs take genitive or ablative objects. This is important information, and in order to find it, a reader must search in a second dictionary.
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