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Diary of a Madman Original recording reissued


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Music

Image of album by Ozzy Osbourne

Photos

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Biography

Biographyby Barry Weber

Though many bands have succeeded in earning the hatred of parents and media worldwide throughout the past few decades, arguably only such acts as Alice Cooper, Judas Priest, and Marilyn Manson have tied the controversial record of Ozzy Osbourne. The former Black Sabbath frontman has been highly criticized over his career, mostly due to rumors denouncing him as a ... Read more in Amazon's Ozzy Osbourne Store

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Frequently Bought Together

Diary of a Madman + Blizzard Of Ozz [Expanded Edition] + Bark At The Moon
Price For All Three: £24.13

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Product details

  • Audio CD (20 May 2002)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording reissued
  • Label: Epic
  • ASIN: B000063KFG
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  Mini-Disc  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 144,690 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Over the Mountain
2. Flying High Again
3. You Can't Kill Rock and Roll
4. Believer
5. Little Dolls
6. Tonight
7. S.A.T.O.
8. Diary of a Madman
9. I Don't Know

Product Description

Product Description

Note that the Bass and Drum tracks on this album have been re-recorded by Ozzy Osbourne's current rhythm section of Robert Trujillo, and Mike Bordin.

BBC Review

Ozzy Osbourne’s second solo album, Diary of a Madman, is a classic rock record in every way – monster guitars, Ozzy’s eerie, wailing vocals, riffs so massive they slap you round the facce, and underpinning it all, pounding drum beats.

Released in 1982, the album has since been re-released twice, most recently in 2002 when the original bass and drum parts of Bob Daisley and Lee Kerslake were re-recorded by Robert Trujillo and Mike Bordin, part of the fall-out from a messy legal dispute between Daisley, Kerslake and Osbourne. Fans of the original loudly objected to the change, but those coming to the album for the first time will hear a band that sounds tight and on the money.

The songs on this album are in the classic rock mold, but they are lifted out of the ordinary by the legendary rock axe God, Randy Rhoads. Diary Of A Madman was the last record he played on before his death while on tour with Osbourne, and his huge guitar sound is all over the record with power riffs and extended guitar solos crammed in at every opportunity.

Bonus live track I Don’t Know perfectly showcases the live magnificence of Osbourne at his peak, with Rhoads giving a virtuoso performance. It makes you understand how the self-proclaimed 'Prince of Darkness' has kept his devoted fans over the past 30 years.

Title track, "Diary Of A Madman", combines strings with a minor key riff, creating a memorable slice of rock that is over-the-top in all the right ways, but other tracks such as "SATO" and "Little Dolls" are filler.

Rock ballad "Tonight" provides a welcome change and "You Can’t Kill Rock and Roll" is a real stand-out track. "Flying High Again" has an almost-bluesy feel, and album-opener Over the Mountain sets the tone for the fast-paced, straight-forward rock on this album.

It might be a conventional rock record, but the thudderingly raucous guitars and the strangely ethereal and creepy vocals mean that it pushes all the right buttons. If you’re a fan of Osbourne, add this one to your collection. --Helen Groom

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

68 of 68 people found the following review helpful By ronster500 on 7 Nov. 2003
Format: Audio CD
The second album from Ozzy after his departure from Black Sabbath, 'Diary of A Madman' continues in much the same vein as 'Blizzard of Ozz' with incredible guitar from the late Randy Rhoads, powerhouse drumming from Lee Kerslake and some inspired playing from Bob Daisley (who wrote much of the material with Randy and Lee). With another strong set of songs this consolidated Ozzy's position after the success of 'Blizzard of Ozz'.
Why then only 1 star for this reissue? You know the answer to that, the shameful decision by the Osbournes to remove the rhythm section and re-record the parts with new players, some twenty years after the original album was made! It is with this album that the whole dispute between Ozzy/Sharon and his former rhythm section originates; when the album first came out in 1981 Ozzy had already decided to replace drummer Kerslake with his friend Tommy Aldridge; the reason Bob Daisley went as well was because he objected to what he saw as a needless line up change to an excellent rock band. So in came Rudy Sarzo on bass, and it is these two musicians (Sarzo/Aldridge) who were listed in the credits on 'Diary', when they did not play a note on the album! This set in motion the dispute that rumbled on for many years afterwards.
Ironically, both Daisley and Kerslake *are* finally given playing credits on this new version, but as performers on the 'original album' - they then list bassist Robert Trujillo and drummer Mike Bordin as having overdubbed their parts on the new version!
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By D. J. Lane on 30 Sept. 2007
Format: Audio CD
This is not the original album its a clobbed together mess, put together so as to avoid paying royalites to the original bass player and drummer, Spiteful in the extreme, Turns out ozzy never even wrote the lyrics for most of his songs as he was too bombed , but that doesnt look good so he and his wife Shazza are trying to change history , Im glad Randy doesnt have to witness this betrayal.. Avoid this get the 1995 reissue , its 1000% better
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Seasoned Rock Fan on 13 Jun. 2007
Format: Audio CD
Agree totally with other 1 star rating. This original album and it's previous Blizzard of Ozz are absolute master class pieces of Rock Music. The fact that the bass-drums have been removed and session musicians brought in by the osbourne corporation is insulting to the band members,Fans and the music industry.

Get the originals.
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38 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 7 Jun. 2011
Format: Audio CD
This for me has always been Ozzy's solo masterpiece. The album has it all: superb, ambitious songwriting, timeless production, musical light and shade (operatic solos, classical arpeggios and country twangs alongside ear-splitting metal) plus some of Ozzy's career-best vocals. I got it on original release and it was years before I heard the background to Ozzy's finest hour: Main songwriter and bassist Bob Daisley was sacked just as the album was finished, along with drummer Lee Kerslake. Neither was mentioned on the album sleeve, instead new recruits Rudy Sarzo and Tommy Aldridge were credited and pictured. Daisley was never paid valuable production or performance fees and to cap it all, the remastered 2002 CDs removed all traces of Daisley's superb bass playing (his Believer and Tonight intros are gorgeous) as well as Kerslake's perfectly pitched drumming - his crime being to side with Daisley in their dispute.

Needless to say, the 2002 remasters were a travesty and Ozzy's vandalism of his own career-best was scorned by all of his non-reality show fans. This clearly wounded Oz and the low-point of his otherwise great autobiography was, for me, his shabby attempt to excuse his treatment of his band mates, which he'd previously blamed on Sharon. The news of this re-remastered edition (ie restoring the original bass and drums) had me thinking there must have been some kind of reconciliation. Maybe now, we'd have the full mea culpa alongside some words of rapprochement with Ozzy's best collaborator outside Sabbath. No such luck sadly: there are no photos of Daisley or Kerslake, no 'making of' story, no discussion of the feuds, bad behaviour or lessons learned.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 31 Jan. 2012
Format: Audio CD
This for me has always been Ozzy's solo masterpiece. The album has it all: superb, ambitious songwriting, timeless production, musical light and shade (operatic solos, classical arpeggios and country twangs alongside ear-splitting metal) plus some of Ozzy's career-best vocals. I got it on original release and it was years before I heard the background to Ozzy's finest hour: Main songwriter and bassist Bob Daisley was sacked just as the album was finished, along with drummer Lee Kerslake. Neither was mentioned on the album sleeve, instead new recruits Rudy Sarzo and Tommy Aldridge were credited and pictured. Daisley was never paid valuable production or performance fees and to cap it all, the remastered 2002 CDs removed all traces of Daisley's superb bass playing (his Believer and Tonight intros are gorgeous) as well as Kerslake's perfectly pitched drumming - his crime being to side with Daisley in their dispute.

Needless to say, the 2002 remasters were a travesty and Ozzy's vandalism of his own career-best was scorned by all of his non-reality show fans. This clearly wounded Oz and the low-point of his otherwise great autobiography was, for me, his shabby attempt to excuse his treatment of his band mates, which he'd previously blamed on Sharon. The news of this re-remastered edition (ie restoring the original bass and drums) had me thinking there must have been some kind of reconciliation. Maybe now, we'd have the full mea culpa alongside some words of rapprochement with Ozzy's best collaborator outside Sabbath. No such luck sadly: there are no photos of Daisley or Kerslake, no 'making of' story, no discussion of the feuds, bad behaviour or lessons learned.
Read more ›
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