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Diary of Geza Csath [Paperback]

Geza Csath , Peter Reich


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Book Description

1 Aug 2004
An acclaimed neurologist widely viewed as Hungary's first contemporary author, Csath was also a morphine addict who shot and killed his wife before doing away with himself. The Diary begins as a clinically graphic depiction of Csath's conquest of dozens of women -- from chambermaids to aristocrats -- during his tenure as a doctor at a Slovakian health spa in 1912. All the while, he is engaged to Olga Honas, a Jewish girl he places above all other women in sensuality but considers 'entirely without moral taste'. Csath regularly injects morphine and opium to increase his enjoyment of certain events and lessen the discomfort of others. The second half of the diary is his harrowing descent into hopeless narcotic addiction. The effect is heightened by Csath's unsparing honesty and acute powers of self-observation. 'The Diary of Geza Csath' is introduced by Arthur Phillips and includes an essay by Dezso Kosztolanyi, summarising Csath's strange, unfinished life. Translated from Hungarian by Peter Reich. Includes period photographs, chronology and a map. Recommended for readers of Stendahl, Burroughs, Bulgakov, De Quincey, Casanova.

Product details

  • Paperback: 182 pages
  • Publisher: Angelusz & Gold Publishing (1 Aug 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9632066537
  • ISBN-13: 978-9632066530
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 13.2 x 1.1 cm
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,466,425 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From the Publisher

Angelusz & Gold announces the publication of The Diary of Geza Csath. (1887-1919), with an introduction by Arthur Phillips. An acclaimed neurologist widely viewed as Hungary’s first contemporary author, Csath was also a morphine addict who shot and killed his wife before doing away with himself. The Diary begins as a clinically graphic depiction of Csath’s conquest of dozens of women – from chambermaids to aristocrats – during his tenure as a doctor at a Slovakian health spa in 1912. All the while, he is engaged to Olga Jonas, a Jewish girl he places above all other women in sensuality but considers "entirely without moral taste". Csath regularly injects morphine and opium to increase his enjoyment of certain events and lessen the discomfort of others. The second half of the diary is his harrowing descent into hopeless narcotic addiction. The effect is heightened by Csath’s unsparing honesty and acute powers of self-observation. The!
Diary of Geza Csath is introduced by Arthur Phillips and includes an essay by Dezso Kosztolanyi, summarizing Csath’s strange, unfinished life.

From the Inside Flap

"In the course of just one day, I live five thousand years... Start smoking opium as a strong, mature man and... you can reach the age of twenty million." - Opium (Short story by Geza Csath), 1909.

"100 years (of opium addiction) aren't worth as much as 34 (sober), with their real, true pleasures." - Csath's diary entry, 1913.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
A terrible and depressing thought: I no longer have any inclination to write. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  2 reviews
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Flawed Man 12 May 2006
By Stephen Hancock - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
After reading Csath's short stories on addiction I thought I was ready for anything, but his diary also chronicles some loathsome behavior towards women that disgusted me. While Csath is one of the world's best anyalysts of the addictive state, He's at least a cad, and at most a rapist. It's hard to believe that people used to think this way.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I confess I've rarely encountered such an utterly unlikable person 27 Aug 2012
By Meaghan Good - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
My god, what jerk. I wanted to smack Csath all the way through this book. I don't understand how he was able to sleep with so many women -- his patients, his patients' daughters, IN THE EXAMINING ROOM for crying out loud -- without contracting all sorts of nasty diseases. But I couldn't get enough of this. It was like watching a train wreck. Or the Jerry Springer show.
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