Buy Used
Used - Very Good See details
Price: 2.64

or
 
   
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Diaries [Illustrated] [Hardcover]

Alan Clark , Ion Trewin
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Illustrated --  
Paperback --  
Audio, Cassette, Audiobook --  

Book Description

1 Jun 1993

AINTO POLITICS begins in 1973 with Clark¿s selection as Tory candidate for Nancy Astor¿s old seat in Plymouth (rival candidates included future Conservative luminaries Michael Howard and Norman Fowler). Alan Clark describes his election to the Commons in the 1974 general election; his years as a backbencher coincide with Edward Heath as PM, his downfall and the arrival of Margaret Thatcher. This volume ends with the inside story of the Falklands War.

In his private life Alan and his wife Jane and their two young sons take over Saltwood Castle, previously the home of his father Kenneth (Civilisation) Clark. His enthusiasms for the estate, skiing, fast cars and girls are never far away.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: W&N; illustrated edition edition (1 Jun 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0297813528
  • ISBN-13: 978-0297813521
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 15.4 x 4.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 162,435 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Book Description

The long-awaited second volume of the century's most phenomenally successful political diaries.

From the Publisher

Engagingly written in a light-hearted style which transfers effortlessly to tape.
With the author reading his own words, we are given an enhanced personal account. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
33 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Political or not - you should read this book 5 Mar 2001
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
A brilliant warts-and-all expose of the United Kingdom's runaway political party of the 1980's. Deeply honest, often brilliant, occasionally slipping into self-pitying apathy, Alan Clark documents a uniquely personal (and, many would say, uncomfortably realistic) view of the steamroller that was Thatcherism. Balanced by an enviable personal account of his time as one of the upper classes, this book delivers pleasure by the bucket-load on many levels. Overall, an immensley enjoyable and insightful read - even if, like myself, you do not share his views, background, politics, etc. The world is a poorer place without Alan Clark.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic political biography 25 Sep 1999
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Alan Clark's diaries are a compelling read. The man may be pomposity personified, hold unbelievably snobbish views on the importance to Britain of the landed gentry and his sheer vanity can take your breath away, but his personal charm oozes out of the book. He's frank, funny, articulate and (as he keeps on telling us) deeply intelligent. He's not afraid to put on paper things that remain only in most people's subconscious. There's a lovely early entry when, installed in his first ministerial office, he wonders if urinating from his seventh floor window on the pedestrians below might be enough to get him sacked. They'd hush it up he concludes - but doesn't test his theory.
Alan Clark's political views belong to a different (before his own) era, but his insights into the political process, his proximity to the hub of Government during the Thatcher years and the pure recklessness of his entries make this a great book.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A tremendous read and re-read.... 6 Sep 2004
Format:Paperback
Alan Clark's diary is a book that the reader can read and re-read, find favourite passages time and time again and then quite unexpectedly discover new entries that will become the new favourite passages.
The book follows Clark through his time as a Junior Minister and his successes, failures and plotting in his various posts, his endless trips abroad and wasted afternoons in pointless and tedious meetings and visits to his constituency. He longs to have higher office but probably knows that cerrtain 'indiscretions' and his often radical views will rule him out of this. Clark's views are wide-ranging and radical and strong views are expressed ranging from animals to the 'lower classes'. He also expresses admiration for unlikely opponents such as Dennis Skinner MP and cries when he is forced to shoot a heron. This is what makes him such a fascinating individual. He is not predictable and the reader does not know what to expect next.
The reader also sees Clark and his rich and varied private life - at points it seems he exists to only spot pretty girls in the crowd. What does come through, however, is his love for his wife, although, as he himself says, he often treats her badly, and his love of his trips to Zermatt and Scotland. This is a man who is privileged and has lived well.
The other editions of the diaires are also well worth reading and I defy anyone not to be moved to tears at the end of the final volume.
In conclusion many readers may find Clark unlikeable but they must ask themsleves what would the public reaction be to the publication of their own diaires?? Read this book, enjoy it and take it with a pinch of salt and hope that more individualistic politicians such as Clark will enter public life.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Superbly read by the 'noel coward' of politics 20 Jun 2001
Format:Audio Cassette
Alan Clark reads from his diaries. His voice and intonation are sublime. The epitome of an old Etonian, he nonetheless effs and blinds his way through the cream of British political establishment of the 80s and 90s. Sadly this is a rather clumsy edit of the written diaries and leaves many references incomprehensible to the untutored ear (for example TK means Tom King, The Lady means Maggie Thatcher). There are no political autobiographies that make you laugh out loud except AK Diaries and few that give you an unexpurgated view of the personalities. No quarter sought or given in this giant of audio books... Now he is no longer with us, when I finished this tape yesterday I was deeply sad that he did not record the whole of his diaries. Scoop up this gem now - because you're worth it and so was he.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Alan Clark's diaries are a compelling read. The man may be pomposity personified, hold unbelievably snobbish views on the importance to Britain of the landed gentry and his sheer vanity can take your breath away, but his personal charm oozes out of the book. He's frank, funny, articulate and (as he keeps on telling us) deeply intelligent. He's not afraid to put on paper things that remain only in most people's subconscious. There's a lovely early entry when, installed in his first ministerial office, he wonders if urinating from his seventh floor window on the pedestrians below might be enough to get him sacked. They'd hush it up he concludes - but doesn't test his theory.
Alan Clark's political views belong to a different (before his own!) era, but his insights into the political process, his proximity to the hub of Government during the Thatcher years and the pure recklessness of his entries make this a great book.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Review 5 Feb 2014
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Most of the people who are talked about in this book are not well known therefore his comments fall on waste ground. He made out that his job at the Department of Employment was particularly boring and didn't seem to have to make a worthwhile decisions. Haven't got to the end of the book yet but imagined it would be a more amusing and enlightening read but so far cant say it is! Was thinking of recommending it for our Book Club read but not sure it would have been well received.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Rotten Old Roué
He was a horrible old Tory but he had a spark of life about him that made him not as repellent as his disgusting colleagues. Read more
Published 7 days ago by clare
5.0 out of 5 stars Insightful and entertaining
I reviewed the second volume of the diaries...and I say pretty much the same here. This is a really entertaining piece of work that provide a fly on the wall coverage of the... Read more
Published 5 months ago by Dr G
5.0 out of 5 stars Uproriously funny - especially his desire to urinate on the general...
This is an authentic slice of real English upper class humor. As a member of the general public I found Clark's desire to urinate on us uproariously funny. Read more
Published 10 months ago by Mr. P. I. Browne
1.0 out of 5 stars Deeply Unfunny
I bought Diaries (Weidenfeld and Nicolson), for my father as a retirement present in 1993. Twenty years later, IDaries comes across as deeply unfunny, with Alan Clark's frank... Read more
Published 10 months ago by Dan Smith
4.0 out of 5 stars Required Reading
This book is required reading for those interested in the Thatcher government at its zenith and also for the events leading to Thatcher's downfall. Read more
Published 13 months ago by Rf And Tm Walters
1.0 out of 5 stars Dull
Very dull and gave up without finishing. Was expecting a bit more gossip and excitement. Nowhere near as interesting as other political autobiographies I have read
Published 19 months ago by mm
5.0 out of 5 stars A gift
as part of the set of three for my husband who has been wanting to read them for some time.
Published 19 months ago by G. Braund
5.0 out of 5 stars "But They Are Real Diaries."
One thing is for sure, these are real diaries. If you want to see under the bonnet of politics and government, then a read of Alan Clark's diurnal scribblings will repay your time. Read more
Published 20 months ago by T. T. Rogers
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the last great British politicians
Alan Clarke was one of the last genuine politicians who had the interests of the British people at heart and dare I say, also the Europeans. Read more
Published on 20 April 2011 by A European Man
5.0 out of 5 stars The best one
Excellent reviews are published by people far more articulate than me - so all I would like to add is that having bought this book shortly after it was published I still pick it up... Read more
Published on 13 Feb 2011 by Mrs. T
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback