Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now
Buy Used
£0.99
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: SUPER FAST SHIPPING, DISPATCHED SAME DAY FROM UK WAREHOUSE. NO NEED TO WAIT FOR BOOKS FROM USA. GREAT BOOK IN GOOD OR BETTER CONDITION. MORE GREAT BARGAINS IN OUR ZSHOP.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Diana: The Lonely Princess Hardcover – May 1996

1 customer review

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£8.50 £0.99

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save £20 on Amazon.co.uk with the aqua Classic card. Get an initial credit line of £250-£1,200 and build your credit rating. Representative 32.9% APR (variable). Subject to term and conditions. Learn more.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 286 pages
  • Publisher: Birch Lane Pr (May 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1559723602
  • ISBN-13: 978-1559723602
  • Product Dimensions: 3.2 x 16.5 x 24.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,082,943 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Diana, The Lonely Princess by Nicholas Davies is an affecting read that is perfect for a cold, dismal, rainy afternoon. The information is presented in a concise, well organized, journalistic fashion that essentially focuses on the life of Diana Frances Spencer from her marriage to her divorce.

Some of the information is quite stunning in its accuracy. Pages 136/137 reference a conversation that occurred at Balmoral “that god forsaken place” and is a virtual word for word quoting of the actual conversation. This is a stellar example of Diana’s strength of character and how she could stand up for herself when provoked. One has to wonder at how and from what source did the author gain such blistering accuracy!

Page 127 takes an eerie and ominous tone, when Mr. Davies makes reference to what would happen “Even in the most unlikely event that Diana suffered a tragic and fatal accident, Charles could still not marry Camilla without jeopardizing his right to succeed to the throne.” This book was copyrighted in 1996. Per Mr. Davies, “There is wide agreement in the Church of England that there is one circumstance in which divorced people cannot be married in church: that is, if the relationship of the two people wanting to get married was a significant factor in the breakup of the previous marriage. For the Church to marry divorced people in such circumstances would mean condoning adultery.” Charles and Camilla are of course now married, although not by the Church of England. Instead, they were yoked in a civil ceremony at Windsor Guildhall, on April 9, 2005. The ceremony was followed by a Church of England “service of blessing” at St George's Chapel. Of such a “marriage” Mr. Davies speculates “what would this say about his coronation?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
Affecting rainy day read 10 April 2014
By Avid Reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Diana, The Lonely Princess by Nicholas Davies is an affecting read that is perfect for a cold, dismal, rainy afternoon. The information is presented in a concise, well organized, journalistic fashion that essentially focuses on the life of Diana Frances Spencer from her marriage to her divorce.

Some of the information is quite stunning in its accuracy. Pages 136/137 reference a conversation that occurred at Balmoral "that god forsaken place" and is a virtual word for word quoting of the actual conversation. This is a stellar example of Diana's strength of character and how she could stand up for herself when provoked. One has to wonder at how and from what source did the author gain such blistering accuracy!

Page 127 takes an eerie and ominous tone, when Mr. Davies makes reference to what would happen "Even in the most unlikely event that Diana suffered a tragic and fatal accident, Charles could still not marry Camilla without jeopardizing his right to succeed to the throne." This book was copyrighted in 1996. Per Mr. Davies, "There is wide agreement in the Church of England that there is one circumstance in which divorced people cannot be married in church: that is, if the relationship of the two people wanting to get married was a significant factor in the breakup of the previous marriage. For the Church to marry divorced people in such circumstances would mean condoning adultery." Charles and Camilla are of course now married, although not by the Church of England. Instead, they were yoked in a civil ceremony at Windsor Guildhall, on April 9, 2005. The ceremony was followed by a Church of England "service of blessing" at St George's Chapel. Of such a "marriage" Mr. Davies speculates "what would this say about his coronation?" It remains to be seen if the Anglican Church will upstage the Catholic Church when it comes to hypocrisy by crowning Charles, King of England.

Page 128 quotes Chief Petty Officer Michael Colborne as remarking "He [Charles] only married because he knew that it was his duty to provide an heir to the throne." Colborne also states, "I also know that Charles did love Diana. Any suggestion that he never loved her is hogwash." Both statements made, it would seem, with absolutely no awareness of the contradiction of declarations. Add to this the fact that Charles publicly stated in his authorized biography by Jonathan Dimbleby that he never loved Diana, did not want to marry her and did so out of duty and a perceived ultimatum from his father. And we wonder why the British Royal Family is floundering in its current state.

There is a disturbing, skin crawling quote on page 185 from Julia Carling in which she states, "it's not what's really going on that matters but how you make it look publicly." That unfortunately seems to apply far too often when it comes to this institution. How could anyone marry someone they did not love for the sole purpose of producing an heir? Especially by someone who is set to head up an establishment that is supposed to set a positive example for all the "common folk."

The book does occasionally stray from topic, but for the most part is to be applauded for its unflinching accuracy. In fact its authenticity rivals that of the Simone Simmons books with Mr. Davies being the more accomplished writer. I recommend Diana, The Lonely Princess, although overall Queen Elizabeth II, A Woman Who Is Not Amused, by the same author, is the more engaging read.

Diana Frances Spencer has been publically admonished for a variety of hypothetical failings ranging from being a bellicose, boring, immature, petulant, obsessively jealous, nightmare to a self-absorbed and self-destructive neurotic. Her husband evidently married her because she was good breeding stock, never caring about her beyond that point and did so while committed to a longtime courtesan. The Daily Mirror put the case bluntly: "He [Charles] is not the first royal to be unfaithful. Far from it. But he is the first to appear before 25 million of his subjects to confess." With all that contentment, joy and marital bliss, what possible reason could she have for being difficult or obstinate?

Diana devoted her life to serving others; to lifting them out of their despair and to helping them find their path in life, so much so that she lost her own way in the process. She deserved much better than she received. How sad that while living, Diana was forced to sell newspapers, magazines and air time as well as maximize rating points only to be obliged to sell movies, books, plays and consumer goods in the afterlife.

A quote from the Daily Telegraph on page 124 perhaps sums it up best when they spoke of Diana by observing, "her situation, though privileged, is not enviable."

TO SAY THE VERY LEAST!!!

Suggested related reading:
1) A Hero From Zero, The Story of Kleinwort Benson and Mohamed Fayed by Roland W. "Tiny" Rowland
2) An article entitled Holy War At Harrods by Maureen Orth writing for Vanity Fair magazine @ guardianlies.com.
3) Queen Elizabeth II: A Woman Who Is Not Amused by Nicholas Davies
4) Dead Wrong 2: Diana, Princess of Wales by Richard Belzer
5) How They Murdered Princess Diana: The Shocking Truth by John Morgan
6) By Hook Or By Crook by Steven Martindale
7) Diana - The Last Word by Simone Simmons

All books are available through Amazon [Martindale the exception] at the time of this writing with the Orth article @ guardianlies.com.
Was this review helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback