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Diabolus In Musica Explicit Lyrics, Original recording reissued

18 customer reviews

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In the beginning, when there were no blueprints, no set paths, no boundaries or steps to follow, Slayer assaulted the world with its new hybrid of metal and punk. Heavier, faster and darker than the rest, Slayer set the new standard which all others continue to follow. Slayer - Tom Araya/bass and vocals, Kerry King and Jeff Hanneman/guitars, and Dave Lombardo/drums - is the band that other ... Read more in Amazon's Slayer Store

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Diabolus In Musica + God Hates Us All + Christ Illusion
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Product details

  • Audio CD (18 Mar. 2002)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics, Original recording reissued
  • Label: American Recordings
  • ASIN: B000062YBZ
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 31,612 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Bitter Peace
2. Death's Head
3. Stain of Mind
4. Overt Enemy
5. Perversions of Pain
6. Love to Hate
7. Desire
8. In the Name of God
9. Scrum
10. Screaming from the Sky
11. Point

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jane Aland VINE VOICE on 4 April 2005
Format: Audio CD
From Reign In Blood onward Slayer had looked to be an unstoppable thrash metal juggernaut, even managing to maintain their high quality while negotiating such potential pitfalls as losing drummer Dave Lombardo and releasing an album of punk covers. Diabolus In Musica however, shows the first chinks in the bands armour, as for the first time in a long time the quality control slips and a Slayer album suffers from some filler tracks.
With the return of the one-man riff-machine Jeff Hanneman to writing dominance after his relative lack of input on the bands last album (with all but one song either written or co-written by Hanneman this is the complete mirror image of the Kerry King dominated Divine Intervention) one would expect this to be a return to the glories of old, but surprisingly after the 'War Ensemble'-esque opening track this album settles down into a glut of mid-tempo groove-based songs, with Tom Araya almost going into rap mode at times. Yes - Diabolus In Musica is the sound of Slayer discovering the foul horror that is nu-metal.
Despite the sheer awfulness of weak nu-metal bands influencing the mighty Slayer, most of these mid-tempo groovers are actually heavy as hell, and do at least see Slayer breaking new musical ground - the downside is there are simply far too many of them, with 'Perversions of Pain' being the only other up-tempo speed metal track on the first two thirds of the album.
The cracks really start to show during the albums latter half; 'Desire' is a rather bland dirge, while Kerry King's 'In The Name Of God' suffering from being yet another mid-tempo groover, and inferior to the several we've already had.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By S. Wright on 29 May 2004
Format: Audio CD
Slayer is one of those bands that you either love or hate, you can't take them or leave them. They're also one of those bands that are downright exhausting, and unless you have been 'Slatanic' for some time, it can be quite difficult to sit through one sitting, especially in recent years.
The more hardcore, shouting style that Tom Araya has established over the last few years has also been something of a sore point, some fans, less than others I must say, don't like it half as much as his growlings on the likes of the classics 'South Of Heaven' and the immortal 'Reign In Blood'. None of Slayer's modern recordings (with the exception of perhaps 'God Hates Us All') will ever be recognised as classics like Slayer's earlier efforts but that is in no way Araya's fault, that is due to those albums being revoultionaries. Slayer's modern day albums are completely different beasts, 'beast' probably being the best word for it.
Slayer in modern times are more groove driven than they ever have been, rather than the pure-thrash of their earlier outings, and yet they retained a sound that didn't in any way ''sell-out'' and one that was monumentally, Slayer. On 'Diabolus In Musica' (latin for 'The Devil In Music'), Slayer still refuse to embrace melody, but the pure groove of the album makes it a demanding and yet compelling listen. In fact, 'Diabolus In Musica' is Slayer's most groove driven outing, and is also one of their ahem, 'slowest'. By slow I mean, 200rpm rather than about 400...
With the exception of 'God Hates Us All', 'Diabolus In Musica' is Slayer's best modern day album to date. Each instrument is just as important as the other, both guitars being as monumental as the insane, bone-cracking drumming of Paul Bostaph, the fine bass work and Araya's insane screaming.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 Oct. 2000
Format: Vinyl
Slayer are one of the hardest metal bands around and are up there with the likes of Pantera as the band holding the fort for the true metal fans, whilst so called heavy metal bands like Def Leppard and Bon Jovi release pop based albums. This album is another classic by the band, especially in that it was produced by rock super producer Rick Rubin. This is the bands eighth album and is really a true return to form for this thrash metal band. Although the base of the album is thrash metal the sound does vary from the grunge style of "In The Name Of God", to the hip hop beats (no doubt influenced by Rubin) of "Love To Hate", but generally the album is hard metal such as on the tracks "Point", "Stain Of Mind", "Desire" and "Pervasions Of Pain". Overall it's a great album and is among the band's best work.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Feb. 2000
Format: Audio CD
I must confess to being slightly disappointed with this album. There are signs of progression - particularly with guitar sound and vocals, but several songs on the album appear to chug along without a really good riff. A few more dynamic changes wouldn't go amiss either. Having said that, this album scores top marks on aggression, and Paul Bostaph's drumming is quite awesome. Slayer's musical direction appears to be towards a more hardcore style and, while I would hate them to play 'popular' music, too much of this causes the album to drag. Despite this, 'Bitter Peace', 'Stain of Mind' and 'Scrum' rank as thrash metal classics.
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By ratmonkey on 12 Aug. 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This, and not their previous and excellent album Divine Intervention, is where the wheels started to come off of the Slayer train. The metal scene had taken a big hit, especially in the UK, as it was deemed seriously uncool by most and shunned by the charts. This was not to prove too much of a problem as society slowly got its sanity back and the awful nu-metal explosion quickly morphed into a re-appreciation of all things metal, so much so that even today most of the genre, and many of its sub-genres and off-shoots, enjoy relatively fair coverage, especially due to the more comprehensive access to media through digital and web-based avenues. But back in the late '90s, early noughties, it was grim. In fact most of the '90s was pretty poor. And this is evident on Diabolus in Musica. There are a few 'old skool' Slayer tracks but the majority is down-tuned, slow-paced dirgery featuring influences from upstarts like Slipknot (Slipknot are awesome, don't get me wrong, it's just that Slayer was their influence and it should never be transposed) and certain rap-metal abominations (Public Enemy and Anthrax cross over thingy aside, rap-metal is a beast that should be dead - and thankfully kind of is now).

'Bitter Peace' is excellent. The one consistent aspect about Slayer, the one thing you can rely on always without exception - and this even includes World Painted Blood - is their ability to sheer the flesh from your skull with a truly outstanding opening track. 'Evil Has No Boundaries', 'Hell Awaits', 'Angel of Death', 'South of Heaven', 'War Ensemble', 'Killing Fields' can now add 'Bitter Peace' to the list (well, and 'Disciple', 'Flesh Storm' and 'World Painted Blood' here in 2010).
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