Devil's Whore 1 Season 2008

Amazon Instant Video

Season 1
(71) IMDb 7.3/10

1. The Devil's Whore - Episode 1 AGES_15_AND_OVER

First in a four-part drama telling the story of the English Civil War through the eyes of a spirited aristocratic woman. Angelica is born in 1623, when England is divided both politically and religiously, a time when political disobedience turned to revolution and civil war, and English history changed forever.

Starring:
Ben Aldridge, Peter Capaldi
Runtime:
1 hour 2 minutes

The Devil's Whore - Episode 1

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Product Details

Genres Military & War, Drama, Historical
Director Marc Munden
Starring Ben Aldridge, Peter Capaldi
Supporting actors Michael Fassbender, Tom Goodman-Hill, Maxine Peake, Andrea Riseborough, John Simm, Dominic West
Season year 2008
Network 4OD
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

76 of 80 people found the following review helpful By A. Luddite on 5 Mar 2010
Format: DVD
I first saw this series when it was first shown on Channel 4 and was overwhelmed by the production design. Although the story is a variation on "Forever Amber" and showcases plenty of bodice-ripping interludes, it is overshadowed by the quite magnificent scenery, restricted colour palettes and costume design, possibly the most authentically impressive of any I have seen in a television drama. The set pieces of Charles I's court, trial and execution are astounding and Peter Capaldi must have really immersed himself in research to have achieved the perfect mirror image of the monarch himself, somehow juxtaposing the regal arrogance of God's annointed with the trembling humanity of the condemned man and achieving what Bernini is said to have remarked upon receiving Van Dyke's portrait; "He hath the most unfortunate face I have ever looked upon".
There are weaknesses, of course. Historical facts have been twisted to accomodate the plotline and there is little evidence of Oliver Cromwell being the devout family man of his private life, as his own family are never seen. There is a confusion in direction, with Sexby changing sides in almost every episode but then this is essentially a story of love in war.
Story aside, this is an extrordinary visual event; put away the text books and enjoy the view. Fantastic.
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117 of 125 people found the following review helpful By S. Hammond on 15 Jan 2009
Format: DVD
As with many 'period' dramas, The Devil's Whore is guilty of bending the truth somewhat. The best way to approach this sort of drama is to take it for what it is, a very entertaining series that, admittedly, would have probably been given 5 stars had it been longer, but the condensing of what was originally intended to be a ten episode drama into 4 episodes was the consequence of the BBC's decision to bump the drama to Channel 4.

Andrea Riseborough is a huge success as the intoxicatingly unconventional Van Dyck-esque Angelica Fanshawe, the central (fictional) character who unites the important people and events of the Civil War and Interregnum. But this political upheaval provides more or less the background to her life.

Starting out as a doll-like debutant courtier, she is troubled by having seen the Devil during certain instances in her life (a little bit of an unnecessary inclusion to an otherwise excellent story-line in my view).
Angelica is married with the encouragement of her guardian, King Charles, to her cousin and childhood friend, Harry Fanshawe. At this time,she comes into contact with hardened mercenery Edward Sexby, and is initially both repelled and intrigued by his thirst for battle and his drifting way of life. As the grimness of the Civil War unfolds, Angelica's boyish husband finds himself in deep water in command of Roylist troops. Demonstrating his military inexperience, he suffers an ebarassing defeat by Cromwell's troops, and King Charles is less than forgiving to the unfortunate pair.

Widowed and helpless, Angelica attracts unwanted advances from a chauvenistic merchant and accidentally gets embroiled in a murder scandal that won't seem to leave her alone.
Read more ›
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Leander on 18 Jun 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
As other reviewers have noted, it's not all historically accurate, but this four-part TV series has a gritty sensuality that conjures up a very convincing 17th-century world. Helped along by an intelligent and lyrical script, and by a talented cast, this is one of the best historical dramas of recent years. Its focus is the wealthy heiress Angelica Fanshawe, cast adrift in the changing factions of the Civil War, who finds sanctuary first in Cromwell's inner circle and then among the Levellers and Diggers, whose dreams of a better world stray even further from the world in which she grew up.

Intelligently shot, the series doesn't suffer overmuch from its small budget and the cinematography revels in its handful of opportunities to show larger vistas of grassland or sea. Much of the drama comes from a more intimate focus on human relationships, and on the conflicting demands of duty, desire, trust and principle. Blending political history with religious fervour, the series presents a very nuanced window onto the Civil War, where no one is entirely wicked or entirely blameless.

The luminous Andrea Riseborough shows both Angelica's steel and her vulnerability, while Dominic West turns Cromwell into a bluff, blunt, sympathetic figure: a man who has unwittingly enabled a revolution that he suddenly realises could spiral out of control. Michael Fassbender, Peter Capaldi and Maxine Peake provide able support; and John Simm turns in a compelling performance as the cynical, tough but troubled mercenary Edward Sexby. Compelling enough, in fact, to make him an entirely unlikely heartthrob.

It's a brave and original series, a cut above much of what has been on TV in the last few years, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. For a longer review, please visit my blog via my profile.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By hamish kay on 17 Aug 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
a brilliant film. historically inaccurate but fun. great cast. the real sexby always fought for parliament so the film is inaccurate there, but that is scriptwriters for you.
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35 of 40 people found the following review helpful By H. Lacroix on 14 Oct 2009
Format: DVD
I loved watching this series when it was shown on Channel four. Both leading actors, Simm and Riseborough, were excellent and the supporting cast didn't let them down.John Simm on his own would have made watching this worth while.His character is so full of contradictions that he is fascinating. A blood-thirsty mercenary, fiercely loyal,capable of dealing with unrequited love without taking advantage when it would have been so easy for him, his silent, brooding presence is mesmerising. Capaldi made a very convincing king Charles the first, showing facets of his personality that enabled us both to understand him and sometimes pity him. Dominic West is a first quality actor and his portrayal of Cromwell was interesting in all its ambiguities.Difficult to like and difficult to loathe! I am no historian so I won't give an opinion on accuracy. Visually, this series was striking and I must congratulate the make up artists who managed to age Riseborough in a very convincing manner. This is so rarely the case it deserves to be mentioned.
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