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Destroyer of Worlds Hardcover – 10 Nov 2009

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 365 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; 1 edition (10 Nov. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765322056
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765322050
  • Product Dimensions: 16.6 x 3.2 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 625,712 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. F. Stevens HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 23 July 2014
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
The third 'Worlds' novel. For a long time I resisted buying into yet another 'series', but having read all the rest of Niven's books about Known Space and the Ringworld I finally succumbed, and I'm glad I did. It is not Niven's best work by any means, but even so it is a lot better than much of what masquerades as SF from other authors these days.

Most of the action takes place in the last two centuries before the first Ringworld novel, and describes more of what happens five hundred years after a human colony ship was the first to encounter the Puppeteers, here as the self-styled Citizens, and why the Puppeteers embarked on their migration.

The action follows on directly from what occurs in Fleet of Worlds and Juggler of Worlds and deals with how the Citizens and the Colonists interact with the new species the Gw'Oth and how they cope with the major threat of the ruthless all-destroying Pak fleets heading towards them in their escape from the Galactic core explosion.

Of course it is not that simple, because there is also a strong emphasis on the activities of Citizens Nessus and Baedeker as they continue to attempt to manipulate the humans while opposed by Sigmund Ausfaller, and the plot twists and turns and knits with some of the events described previously in the other Known Space books.

It helps if you have already read Niven's books about Known Space but this is not essential, so long as you read both of the first two Worlds novels before this one. Being the third of a series don't expect to find a completely neat ending with all loose ends tied off, but it is still eminently satisfactory, apart from a lingering urge to buy the next exciting episode...
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By D. J. Ketchin on 28 Jun. 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
The Pak colonised earth a million years ago then died out leaving only their idiot juveniles behind.
Unable to obtain the biochemical trigger that metamorphosed the juvenile pak into superhuman Protectors the pak evolved into Humanity.
Now the Puppeteer Fleet of Worlds is in the way of a Pak migration fleet fleeing the supernovae of the galactic core.
How will the puppeteers and their human allies deal with this threat to their own migration out of the galaxy?

This latest in the 'secret history of known space' ties together Nivens novels Protector and the Ringworld books and clears up a few inconsistencies.

This is by far the best of this series of collaborative novels, but its pointless to read it if you havent read Protector.
Its a decent read , but falls flat compared to either Protector or Ringworld.

I did enjoy this series - but only because there have been so few new Niven novels in the last 2 decades.
Its a nostalgic trip down memory lane for true niven fans.
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54 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Ed.F TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 19 Nov. 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've been reading Larry Niven since I was eight and for over thirty years I've been enthralled by the worlds of known space. Niven's works always balanced storytelling, characterisation and imaginative flair with a slight vagueness within the detail and logic. It might have been the vagueness which allowed more room for my imagination to paint in the gaps and create the wondrous worlds I'd always viewed in my minds eye when reading about known space.

In this latest series, the "worlds" books, Niven has been attempting to fill in with plot some of the gaps left in his earlier works. It could have been an admirable effort instead it's killing the grace, style and panache of the earlier stories and reducing his most glorious creations, the puppeteers to mere humans in silly costumes.

On a technical level "Destroyer of worlds" is a good book, pacey and well written with the return of the paranoid but extremely capable Sigmund Austfaller as the prime foil behind yet more drama for the fleet of worlds, this time from a ravening horde of Protectors. It ties up yet more strings from various short stories and books of Known space, mostly "Protector" and it wraps up to an intellectually satisfying conclusion. But on an emotional level it's sterile, smug and reads like a fan-boi wish list wrapped in narrative rather than anything truly new.

From the dénouement of this work, it feels like the end of the process as the narrative timeline is almost up there with the start of Ringworld though there might be space for one more volume. But after 30 odd years of obsessively buying all of Larry Niven's books I though I thought I'd never say this, it's time to stop Mr Niven, you haven't anything more to say here.
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Superb. The solution for the Pak fleet was a bit anticlimactic as it simply dumped the problem in other civilisations laps. Amazes me how the authors make it tie together
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The book was physically perfect, the delivery was fine but disappointingly the story is not a patch on the earlier Ringworld series.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By P. G. L. Gilmore on 25 April 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Niven & Lerner's Fleet of Worlds series is quite diverse in content. My favourite is Juggler of Worlds, which deals with Sigmund Ausfaller's extensive career (he gets killed twice (so far)). Destroyer of Worlds is my least favourite. Far too much planetary-scale shoot-em-up, casual xenogenocide, and horribleness for its own sake. Also excessive multiple-viewpoint toing_&_froing, which makes for a difficult read while you try to remember which character is where, and who knows what. This is a common feature of Niven's work, and others'. It must be an easy pitfall to stumble into while working on a collaboration. The most annoying detail, however, is the author-imposed obtuseness whereby the combined wisdom of Human and Puppeteer takes so long to come up with the obvious method of dealing with a fast sub-lightspeed, ramscoop-propelled fleet of monsters: pop out of hyperspace half a light-minute ahead of an invader; drop (e.g.) a small fusion bomb or a cloud of ball bearings; scarper. Repeat until infection clears. Simples (squeak!)
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