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Destroy Erase Improve
 
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Destroy Erase Improve

5 Dec. 1995 | Format: MP3

£6.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
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Popularity  
30
1
5:48
30
2
5:38
30
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5:17
30
4
3:34
30
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5:04
30
6
3:16
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4:30
30
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3:47
30
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4:20
30
10
5:14
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 5 Dec. 1995
  • Label: NUCLEAR BLAST RECORDS
  • Copyright: 1995 Nuclear Blast GmbH
  • Total Length: 46:28
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001N0JAN4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 56,565 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Sebastian Palmer TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 8 Oct. 2007
Format: Audio CD
I felt compelled to write this review after reading about eight of the other reviews. As a quick preface: I'm not what you'd call a 'metal fan' as such. I grew up on a diet of classic rock (Zep, Cream, Purple etc), and even followed this interest through to the metal of the 'eighties (Maiden, Metallica, Slayer etc), but my chief musical passions lead me to music like Tom Waits, Joni Mitchell, and jazz, funk & soul (Coltrane, Davis, James Brown, The Meters, Curtis Mayfield etc).

My two main points are, however, firstly: that this is - musically at least - phenomenal stuff. Not knowing (or even particularly caring for) genres such as 'death metal' etc I can't compare Meshuggah with all the other bands in this area (e.g. I've never heard Fear Factory). As a drummer I can't help but be awed by Tomas Haake's incredible drumming, and, by way of illustrating some of my limited knowledge of contemporary metal, I find his whole approach (and that of the band as a complete entity) far more interesting and innovative than that of, for example, Mastodon, or their drummer, the much-lauded Brann Daillor. No offence to Daillor, who's clearly a brilliant drummer too, it's just that the Mastodon vibe is much more straight ahead and obvious, which goes for the rhythms and drumming too (and I really quite enjoy some Mastodon stuff by the way).
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 13 Jan. 2000
Format: Audio CD
As far as musical abilities go, this band are awesome. I haven't heard any other type of music (including classical) as complex as this. Basically, if you can't cope with shouted vocals then you won't like this. If you're into silly time signatures, polyrhythms, contemporary classical & jazz, and/or bands like Slayer, Pantera and Fear Factory then you probably will. Its loud, it's nasty and its amazing.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jane Aland VINE VOICE on 2 Oct. 2005
Format: Audio CD
Meshuggah's 2nd full-length album, and a massive improvement over Contradictions Collapse. The band have now lost the Metallica influence and developed their own style of extremely complex thrash metal, where despite the guitars, drums and vocals often seemingly playing different time signatures everything adds up into a cohesive whole. While fairly minimal in terms of chord changes - Meshuggah preferring to use the guitars in a more rhythmic fashion - this is nonetheless both brutal and catchy, with the band at this period of their career sounding not dissimilar to Fear Factory's Demanufacture (released the same year). I haven't given this full marks for a couple of reasons: firstly three of the tracks sounded superior when released in earlier less polished form on the Self-Caged EP, and the band themselves would better this release with the faster, more complex, and more brutal Chaosphere - but Destroy Erase Improve is still a great thrash record, and an ideal starting point for anyone interested in this band.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mike Alan on 27 Jan. 2008
Format: Audio CD
Why the constant comparisons to Fear Factory?? Meshuggah, on this album at least, take more of an influence from Cynic/Pestilence than from FF. This is quite evident in the guitar work on a number of tracks.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Pa Ortiz on 21 Mar. 2004
Format: Audio CD
I'm not entirely sure how I heard about Meshuggah or indeed got round to buying this album. But one thing's for sure...I'm very glad I did. While many metal acts around these days can easily have their influences traced to any number of perm-laden 80's arena-rock bands, Meshuggah seem to draw from more avant-garde and abstract styles of music, specifically jazz fusion, which is demonstrated in the incredibly complex and intricate solo work.
I've heard their music described as "deceptively simple" and this is certainly true. Many of the riffs consist of single notes occassionaly mixed with powerchords and so it would be easy to dismiss the guitarists (and bassist) as untalented. But on a second listen, one begins to appreciate the level of talent required to play in such odd signiatures, with such robotic precision. Added to this that on the whole, the lead guitar work is incredible. It's not your run of the mill "up the pentatonic, down the pentatonic" business. It's more akin to some sort of heavy metal/jazz improv hybrid, but it works. The drumming is undeniably awesome, with every limb seeming to play in different time signiatures, yet keeping in perfect sync. The vocals don't let things down - with a tireless onslaught of guttural screaming sitting perfectly atop the mechanical mayhem created by the other band members. The lyrical content, (whilst familiar territory to any FF fans) is for the most part highly intelligent, dealing with the integration of the organic, and synthetic, and the subversion of the human spirit by the relentless will of "the machine". Very Terminator-esque.
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