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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 14 February 2011
As I embarked upon writing my own review, I nosed around to see what others said - and I was intrigued by the one negative review (sounding quite angry)... This book is based on Lee's (the author's) experience so to discredit it on this ground is a non-issue. It's not claiming to be anything else. And, the book is not written to revolutionise the education system (that is up to tutors). It just says that for this guy and some great people interviewed - design education at college was not as enlightening as it could have been. I am neither a designer nor do I intend to be one but I still find any book about ideas and innovation interesting. What stroke a particular cord with me are the interviews with Paul Smith and Neville Brody. There is so much focus on celebrity and immediate success in creative industries at the moment, especially fashion, so that the journey is almost forgotten. 'Celebrity' culture and immediate gratification is the enemy of creativity and innovation. So it was inspiring to read about Paul Smith recalling the days when he was working Monday to Thursday in order to be able to have his own little shop on Fridays and Saturdays - it took over ten years to become 'Paul Smith'. Similarly, Brody engages with the way education today is about how to find a job rather than it being about exploration; how being recognised is not about being a "celebrity" but it is about making a positive influence. Becoming famous and successful is an end product - that may or may not happen but it is not and should not be a goal. All these issues were prompted by Lee, who was the interviewer. And those 'general' questions about innovation make this book relevant across industries. If I were a young designer, I would definitely pick up a copy but I would not be looking for a method to success. I would use it to learn from Lee's experience that he took time and effort to generously share, be inspired and develop my own critical and creative capacities. That's the gift from Lee to you, the young designer. How you unravel that parcel is up to you. Lida Hujic, author of The First to Know
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 9 July 2006
A "must read" for any new designers entering the business world with their ideas. This book tells you exactly "how it is" out there and how not to make the mistakes that many have made in the past.
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13 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on 19 June 2006
I read this book firstly because I was attracted to the title then the concept, which actually is very much needed within the creative community. This book doesn't say 'do this' or 'do that', and that's a good thing, you can get some really interesting insights and views in there and its up to the reader to utilise it for their own benefit.

I have been running a graphic studio now for almost 8 years and I found a lot of useful ideas in there. It's been passed around the studio now for the rest of the team to look at. I noticed the previous review and the guy or girl sounds like a bit frustrated, maybe another finger pointer who never actually got out there and tried to do it themselves - they also spelt 'pamplet' wrong which is interesting ?!? Anyway, this area should be discussed more within education and maybe as an industry we'll all be in a slightly better position.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 21 June 2006
Great for designers looking to make money from their creations instead of selling out to the sharks! I enjoyed getting a deeper understanding and assurance that it is not easy to be an entrepreneur but with sheer gut, determination and will to succeed if this guy can do it, so can I!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 29 June 2006
As a person entering the commercial world, this book has been very helpfull and has had a relaxing effect on my feelings on how to enter the design world. Its also helped me understand what to expect of the industry and motivated me positively. It was pleasant reading about the different projects that have been completed by this design team. This book doesn't only apply for designers but for any business industry.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 27 June 2006
A friend of mine was raving about this book to me and recommended that I get it. I did get it and loved its philosophy and simply stright-forward advice.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 10 March 2006
I have read a few books this year already like 'How to be a graphic designer without losing your soul' which was good, but this book, designers are wankers, really cleared up a lot of thoughts that have been nagging me and ones that I'd just never have thought of. Really good, thanks to mccormack. The interviews with Paul smith and karim rashid were really useful too.
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11 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on 27 March 2006
This book should really be a pamplet. Its premise is that design graduates need to know more about business and enterprise, but provides little hard information or evidence of research. It's really just anecdotes, badly written and structured, repetitive and boring. Most of the book is painfully obvious. Of course graduates don't learn all they need to know in their courses, but that's the point of working your way up.
Overall, it's not entirely meritless but the information could have been boiled down, made more readable, and put into a small pamphlet. The author just doesn't have enough authority, experience, or ability to produce something of this length. I'm amazed most of it got past an editor.
If you're tempted to buy this just to have the title on your bookshelf, go for it but the title is as good as it gets.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 7 June 2009
This is the thinking design person's "how to" book.
In the broad field of what can be described as design, there are no simple, pat answers. This book encourages those with talent and potential to dig within themselves, asking the questions that can lead them to a personal success that is financially and creatively satisfying. This is not an area of artistic and commercial endeavour that rewards the faint-hearted or the uncommitted. Get real, is the timely, believable message. Designers are Wankers.
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6 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 10 March 2006
I had been feeling frustrated in my job for a while, thinking how did I end up working here? Where is my career really going? Then I read, Designers are wankers, and felt a surge of optimistic energy run through me. Written in a very direct way and getting the message of listening to your self while having your eyes wide open, this book inspires the sleeping child inside of you. It energises the spirit to take that next step now - not tomorrow. I would recommend it to everyone - not just designers.
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