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The Desert Spear (The Demon Cycle, Book 2) Paperback – 28 Apr 2011


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Product details

  • Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager (28 April 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007276176
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007276172
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 5.7 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (248 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 21,047 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Peter went to the University at Buffalo, where he studied Dungeons & Dragons, fencing, and girls. Somehow, he also managed to earn a (totally useful!) Bachelor of Arts degree in English with a minor in Art History in 1995.

Following college, Peter spent approximately 8 months managing a comic shop and pondering what to do with his life. He then went into medical publishing, squandering ten years of his physical prime sitting in a cubicle. He contented himself with writing books he never hoped to sell.

In June of 2007, his hard work and perseverance paid off, as he sold his 4th novel, THE PAINTED MAN, and in October of 2007, he left his day job to pursue writing full time.
He lives in Brooklyn NY with his wife Dani and two cats, Jinx and Max Powers.

Product Description

Review

'I enjoyed The Painted Man immensely. Action and suspense all the way'
Terry Brooks

‘Peter V. Brett is one of my favourite new authors’
Patrick Rothfuss

‘The Painted Man works not only as a great adventure novel but also as a reflection on the nature of heroism’
Charlaine Harris

About the Author

Following college, Peter spent approximately 8 months managing a comic shop and pondering what to do with his life. He then went into medical publishing, squandering ten years of his physical prime sitting in a cubicle. He contented himself with writing books he never hoped to sell.
In June of 2007, his hard work and perseverance paid off, as he sold his 4th novel, THE PAINTED MAN, and in October of 2007, he left his day job to pursue writing full time.
He lives in New York City.


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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Aoide on 2 Oct. 2012
Format: Paperback
Everyone here reading this review must have read and enjoyed the first book, otherwise they wouldn't bother to move on to the second. It's really a shame for me to write about how it disappointed me, as the Painted Man was one of the best fantasy releases I've seen in a while.

While I, to a certain extent, enjoyed reading the first half of the book, which is a recount of Jardirs life, I can imagine a lot of people will find it grating that the first half of the second book, in terms of time line, only brings us to the end of the first book again. I can see why it was done, we need the introduction to Abban, Jardirs Jiwah Ka and to a certain amount the culture they live by (It's a shame we don't get much more out of Jardir that we hadn't gleamed from book one). However, for a section of the book that was, in all essence, a character introduction. So while important it stole a lot more of the book than seemed entirely necessary.

We then move on to the second half of the book, dedicated to Arlen. From here on out until they leave Angiers, the books pace takes on a snail like quality. There are a lot of words dedicated to nothing in particular, we're introduced to how the Hollow has changed, charged glass, Rojers apprentices and a few other bits and pieces. But seeing as the whole first half of the book made no attempt to continue down the plot line, I would hope that some attempt to do so would start appearing at this point.

During the meeting with the duke in Angiers there at last seems to be a feeling of movement, yes we have to sit through the meeting twice, which holds a certain amount of comedic value, but little else, and by this point in the book I was hungry for development, as I was starting to become aware I'd read a lot more than I hadn't.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By GOTTON on 7 Aug. 2013
Format: Hardcover
What a shame that this book is so poor quality when the first novel in this series was (in my view anyway) a tremendous success.

The first and most important thing to know about this book is that it is far too long. It opens with 186 pages of the back story of Jadir which is incredibly tedious and other than the extra insight it gives to the character it doesn't really add a great deal to the progression of the story. The culture of his people and his place in it might have been interesting if it weren't at the expense of a the rest of the story that I had bought this book to read.

When finally the other characters who stared in the first book return to the main stage we find ourselves locked in an endless and repetitive cycle of pining love interests, self denial from the main character and pretty much the same stories that we were told in the last edition in this series. Other than the possession of fighting runes by the characters in this novel the story was much the same as the previous novel only not nearly so well written.

The only area in which this story really progresses is that the Krasnians begin their invasion of the rest of the world (something that is written in the blurb of the book) but even this story line comes to an abrupt halt when the characters from Deliverer's Hollow meet the advancing army. What follows is a drawn out romance between two of the title characters that has no place in this novel as both characters have to forget who they are and their histories in order to progress with it. Eventually they return to the status quo anyway so it is another distracting sideline that could have been ignored.
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25 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Paul Sheridan on 7 July 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've just finished reading the second book in the Demon War sequence (Peter's very clear it's not a trilogy, but that message doesn't seem to have got thru to the marketing and sales people). I'd really been looking forward to this book, cos I'd enjoyed the first one (The Painted Man) so much.

How did it compare to the first? Well, the Painted Man's (i.e. Arlen's) thunder is stolen a bit by Jardir, who believes himself to be the Deliverer rather than Arlen. Thus, we get a strong theme of `dualism'. There are two Deliverers, two main female leads (Leesha and Jardir's first wife), two coreling princes, twin versions of Reena at the end, and so on. The parallelism kinda works cos it hints at two paths for prophecy. It echoes the polarisation of good v evil, light v dark, friend v enemy, etc. It creates a consistent pattern for the book. And the book is largely written in two parts - the first half describing Jardir's life, and the second half Arlen's. The two halves flirt with each other and nearly overlap, but our two protagonists don't actually meet in this book. It leaves things hanging a bit, making us eager for the next book, but also leaving us (well, `me' anyway) a tad dissatisfied. It could just be my personal preference, but I like to see more resolution in a book of so many pages.

Of course, no book is perfect. Some may find parts of the book a bit `domestic' or lacking in action - but others will like that balance. Some may think there's too much mention of rape, others may not. Some may think the handling of the `muslim' people in this book is a bit too obvious, others may not. Ultimately, the book avoids making any clumsy judgements and leaves you to reflect upon your own views of the world.
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