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Desert God Hardcover – 21 Oct 2014

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 425 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow & Company (21 Oct. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 006227645X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062276452
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3.4 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (892 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,731,709 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Wilbur Smith was born in Central Africa in 1933. He became a full-time writer in 1964 after the successful publication of When the Lion Feeds, and has since written over thirty novels, all meticulously researched on his numerous expeditions worldwide. His books are now translated into twenty-six languages.
For all the latest information on Wilbur visit facebook.com/WilburSmith

Product Description

Review

Praise for RIVER GOD:

'Superlatively evocative…Smith’s descriptions hardly falter over 500 pages and [River God] has relentless momentum’
Observer

'Big, brave and blockbusting … brilliantly detailed descriptions of life on the Nile’ Mail on Sunday

'Grand mythical material…. the set pieces are fabulous’ Times Literary Supplement

'High adventure … there is never a lull in his majestic novel overflowing with passion, rage, treachery, barbarism, prolonged excitement and endless passages of sheer, exquisite colour’ The Washington Post

‘A rich, compelling look back in time [to] when history and myth intermingled’ San Francisco Chronicle

‘A grand tale of intrigue, deception, true love and exile’ Denver Post

'An epic of sex, death and intrigue in the Valley of the Kings … richly written … packs in the action … excellent’ Weekend Telegraph

--This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Wilbur Smith was born in Central Africa in 1933. He became a full-time writer in 1964 after the successful publication of When the Lion Feeds, and has since written over thirty novels, all meticulously researched on his numerous expeditions worldwide. His books are now translated into twenty-six languages.

--This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By M. Fisher on 14 Mar. 2015
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Until the past few books I've enjoyed reading every fiction book by Wilbur Smith since I picked up "When the Lion Feeds" in the late 70s. Evocative, engrossing, you could almost smell, hear, see and touch the characters, situations and locations he wrote about. Recently however his crown has slipped so new releases have been greeted with suspicion rather than anticipation - will it be any good this time? Is he back to his best? Is he even writing this?

Especially the Hector Cross novels which I found a weird mix between and Mills & Boon and a violent load of rubbish, with unrealistic dialogue, cardboard characters, plot gaps and errors, and quite frankly gratuitous and distasteful sex and violence (sometime both together).

Taita has never really "grabbed" me and the preposterous The Quest was really the most ridiculous book I have read in many a year - until I read the start of Desert God.

What I eventually realised is a bridge between Warlock (which started to get very silly) just became a constant repetitive exercise as Taita told the readers how good he is at everything - architecture, music, warfare, horse riding, archery, etc etc. In the end what finished it for me, was his assertion that he invented coins (with his hieroglyph on the back of course), the phrase "Royal Mint" and so on. For a book supposedly about Ancient Egypt, he then claimed that modern cultures copied him by adopting coinage - so are we to believe he is writing it in the present day? That stretches things a bit, I know he is supposed to age slower but really?? No doubt later he tells us he invented the telephone, split the atom and won gold medals in the modern-day Olympics!
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46 of 47 people found the following review helpful By mike woodward on 7 Oct. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Having been a fan of Wilbur Smith since the early 70's and indeed having read all his novels I always eagerly await any new ones. The Courtney sagas thrill me every time.
This is the second book I have read featuring Taita and to be honest this one didn't read like a Wilbur Smith. By chapter 3 I was fed up of Taita regaling me with how wonderful he was and it seemed no more than an opportunity for Wilbur to add more words rather than substance to the story. Not the most enjoyable book for me I'm afraid.
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68 of 70 people found the following review helpful By S. Thompson on 17 Oct. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a very poor imitation of the once great Wilbur Smith. If you have read River God then you'll know about Tatia, and what a wonderful and interesting character he is, and how he holds the story of Lostris, Tanus and this very Egypt together. You won't recognise Tatia in this book, however, as it's like comparing a fine wine with sour vinegar. I won't say this book is total rubbish, the story is interesting and the plot moves along nicely......but it's oh so predictable. This is not a Wilbur Smith book, and the ghost writer knocking it out should be ashamed of it. I wish Wilbur would come clean and put the names of his ghost writer on the cover, so the public would know what they're getting....but if he did, who would buy them? Not me, for certain, I've wasted enough money reading fakes.
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61 of 63 people found the following review helpful By TOJO324 on 13 Oct. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am an avid reader of all of Wilbur Smith's books with a full collection of the Africa and Egypt series plus many others and look forward to every new release. Desert God was a huge disappointment. Firstly the character of Taita has been changed from the previous book (The Quest) to someone who is conceited and perfect in every way to a point of loss of credability. That is apart from his manhood which he lost as a slave but was reinstated by the witch he battled with in The Quest but has now mysteriously disappeared again for Desert God without any explanation!!!
The writing style is noticably different from all of the numerous other WS books I have read. Did he really write this one, was it one of the rumoured ghost writers or was it written before The Quest but published after and missed the small matter of Taita's manhood?
This is the first WS I have downloaded onto my Kindle. My disappointment of the content of the book was made worse to find that 90% through my Kindle book the story finished and the remaining 10% was an extended extract from River God, the first in the Egypt series.
Having said all that it is better than many books from other authors I have read but nowhere near the high standard I was expecting. I am still looking forward to his next publication.
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I have read all the Egyptian novels and thoroughly enjoyed them. However this latest one seems to have been written by an amateur looking for money !! The plot is weak and nowhere near as intricate as River God and Warlock. The whole premise of the book effectively negates the premise of Warlock and even The Quest ( which in itself is not one of the better ones.). On the whole I would have to give the book a thumbs down and not recommend it.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Chappers555 on 10 Feb. 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
River God was the first Wilbur Smith book I read, and it remains today as one of my favorite books. I couldn't put it down and couldn't wait to follow Taita's story. The next two I enjoyed equally, although not as enthralling as River God yet followed the same exciting, and enchanting storyline. However, The Quest was a shock to the system! It didn't flow like its predecessors, and Taita himself seems like an entirely different (and distinctly unlikeable) chararcter! This coupled with the absurd and OTT plot, saddened me deeply as it was so far removed from River God in quality. However, I was willing to put this aside, and set about Desert God hoping to renew my faith in Taita and Wilbur....what I found made me feel cheated quite frankly. Taita has become even more unlikeable since the last book, and by the end of the even the first chapter I was bored and irritated of his endless self praise. In fact all the characters were either fairly blank, or downright unlikeable (the Princesses) which was a total contrast from the vivid characters brought to life in earlier books. Even the plot left me bored, it was slow, and utterly utterly predictable, and totally skimmed past any scenes that could be intriguing or exciting, and simply lackied in the intrisic and captivating detail that kept me hooked previously. I feel like this book lacks any of charisma of the previous 3 books, and what I hoped was just a blip in The Quest has unfortunately continued into this book. Fans of the River God, be warned, this WILL disappoint you.
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