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Democratic Enlightenment: Philosophy, Revolution, and Human Rights 1750-1790 Hardcover – 11 Aug 2011


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 1100 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (11 Aug 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 019954820X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199548200
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 6.1 x 16.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 505,458 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

Israel has turned up evidence of the Radical Enlightenment's influence in surprising places, and that labor alone should ensure that this book finds a place on every specialist's shelf. (New York Times Book Review)

a brave and ambitious historian...Israel has found a way of dramatising the debates and attitudes which eventually lay the foundations for something we can call modernity. (BBC History Magazine)

Taken either singly or as part of a trilogy, Democratic Enlightenment is a remarkable achievement, and deservedly places Israel among the finest intellectual historians of our day. (Times Literary Supplement)

About the Author

Jonathan Israel is Professor of Modern History at the Institute for Advance Study, Princeton. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and corresponding fellow of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences. His previous books include The Dutch Republic: Its Rise, Greatness and Fall, 1477-1806, RadicalEnlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of Modernity 1650-1750, and Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man 1670-1752.

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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Robin Friedman TOP 500 REVIEWER on 12 Nov 2011
Format: Hardcover
"Democratic Enlightenment: Philosophy, Revolution, and Human Rights, 1750 -- 1790" is the final volume of a massive trilogy of intellectual history discussing the nature and impact of the Enlightenment. The author, Jonathan Israel, finds that the Enlightenment began in approximately 1680 and concluded by about 1800, after which it was followed by a lengthy period of reaction. The two earlier volumes in the trilogy are "Radical Enlightenment" which deals primarily with Spinoza as the key Enlightenment figure, Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of Modernity 1650-1750 and "Enlightenment Contested" Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man 1670-1752 I have read the former book but have not yet read the latter. Jonathan Israel is Professor of Modern European History at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton.

Israel describes the Enlightenment as "the single most important topic, internationally in modern historical studies, and one of crucial significance also in our politics, cultural studies and philosophy". (p. 1) His books go far to validate that strong claim. This book is not for the casual reader. It consists of 950 pages of dense and difficult text covering both ideas and history. It demands close, slow reading. I had to pause many times after reading only a small number of pages to reflect upon what I had just read. The writing style is lively, passionate, and informed but not especially graceful. Sentences are long and interspersed with many passages from a variety of languages.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Emily Heath on 26 Feb 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Extremely clearly written with a lot of new detail. This book goes beyond the spectrum of most books on the enlightenment. It is fascinating and stimulating for any human being, like me, who just can't get enough information on this fascinating and influential period. Jonathan Israel is not a dry academic, he is someone in love with this period of history and he writes it with verve and as swell as rigour.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is becoming the most talked about academic work in decades. Simply, it is changing our understanding of 'postmodern' now, by clarifying where our thinking came from, why we think what we do now, and how 'postmodernism' has, bluntly, missed the point. It seems likely to me that Jonathan Israel's Enlightenment trilogy, of which this is the culmination, will be remembered long into the future. It is brilliant.
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3 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Jap on 10 Oct 2011
Format: Hardcover
The Democratic Enlightenment: Philosophy, Revolution, and Human Rights 1750-1790 is the last part of three books on Enlightenment. I like the thourough way Isreals describes the period from Spinoza till the French Revolution. When you read the series you will know every philosopher that did write something about Spinoza and his philosphy.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
42 of 44 people found the following review helpful
Democratic Enlightenment 4 Oct 2011
By Robin Friedman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"Democratic Enlightenment: Philosophy, Revolution, and Human Rights, 1750 -- 1790" is the final volume of a massive trilogy of intellectual history discussing the nature and impact of the Enlightenment. The author, Jonathan Israel, finds that the Enlightenment began in approximately 1680 and concluded by about 1800, after which it was followed by a lengthy period of reaction. The two earlier volumes in the trilogy are "Radical Enlightenment" which deals primarily with Spinoza as the key Enlightenment figure,Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of Modernity 1650-1750 and "Enlightenment Contested" Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man 1670-1752. I have read and reviewed the first book here on Amazon but have not yet read the second. Jonathan Israel is Professor of Modern European History at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton.

Israel describes the Enlightenment as "the single most important topic, internationally in modern historical studies, and one of crucial significance also in our politics, cultural studies and philosophy". (p. 1) His books go far to validate that strong claim. This book is not for the casual reader. It consists of 950 pages of dense and difficult text covering both ideas and history. It demands close, slow reading. I had to pause many times after reading only a small number of pages to reflect upon what I had just read. The writing style is lively, passionate, and informed but not especially graceful. Sentences are long and interspersed with many passages from a variety of languages. Most of these passages are translated with the exception of the many important quotations in French which are given only in the original.

Israel offers a complex, multi-threaded account of the Enlightenment which, he realizes, resists easy summarization. An important theme of the book is the role of ideas in moving human behavior and of the objective, universal character of the nature of truth. Both these themes run against a good deal of contemporary relativism and postmodernism. In the lengthy 35 page introduction with which "Democratic Enlightenment" begins, Israel tries to summarize his project and the direction of the book. Among the first things Israel does is to explain what "Enlightenment" is. It is best to rely on Israel's own descriptions rather that to paraphrase:

"Enlightenment, then, is defined here as a partly unitary phenomenon operative on both sides of the Atlantic, and eventually everywhere, consciously committed to the notion of bettering humanity in this world through a fundamental, revolutionary transformation, discarding the ideas, habits, and traditions of the past either wholly or partially, this last point being bitterly contested among enlighteners. Enlightenment operated usually by revolutionizing ideas and constitutional principles, first, and society afterwards, but sometimes by proceeding in reverse order, uncovering and making better known the principles of a great 'revolution' that had already happened. All Enlightenment by definition is closely linked to revolution." (p.7)

"Enlightenment is, hence, best characterized as the quest for human amelioration occurring between 1680 and 1800, driven principally by 'philosophy', that is, what we would term philosophy, science, and political and social science including the new science of economics lumped together, leading to revolutions in ideas and attitudes first, and actual practical revolutions second, or else the other way around, both sets of revolutions seeking universal recipes for all mankind and ultimately, in its radical manifestation, laying the foundations for modern basic human rights and freedoms and representative democracy." (p. 7)

Throughout his study, Israel distinguishes between "radical" and "moderate" Enlightenment. The former has its source in Spinoza and begins with a single-substance metaphysics, the rejection of teleology, providence, miracles, revelation, and religion in favor of reliance on reason as a guide to human affairs. The latter "moderate" enlightenment has its source in a number of individuals, including John Locke, David Hume, Newton, and Leibniz. It tends to seek compromises and to give weight to both reason and religion (either deism or revealed religion) in understanding and in conduct. Radical Enlightenment, for Israel, was the underlying source of the American and particularly the French Revolutions of the late 18th Century. These revolutions were founded on the destruction of arbitrary privilege, on the fundamental equality of all persons, and on the belief that government was made to serve the people rather than the rulers and to promote individual happiness. Moderate enlightenment tended towards skepticism and towards caution against drastic changes. It was willing to temporize with aristocracy and monarchy which it saw as leading to Enlightened despotism. Moderate enlightenment drew a distinction between doctrines appropriate for the learned, which may have approached the teachings of radical enlightment, and doctrines understandable by the large majority of people, which tended towards support for religion and supernaturalism. Moderate enlightenment produced some reforms, on Israel's account, but ultimately useless in leading to fundamental change. Israel's mind and heart lie clearly with the "radical" form of the Enlightenment project, as exemplified in Spinoza, French philosophes such as Diderot and D'Holbach, Lessing, and others.

In the long ensuing text of the book, Israel compares and contrasts radical and moderate enlightenment thought in a variety of places and conditions. The book is extraordinarily learned and richly-textured. Israel begins with a discussion of responses to a series of earthquakes, culmination in the Lisbon earthquake of 1755. Responses to the cause of this disaster varied from the purely natural, with no teleology, (radical enlightenment), to viewing earthquakes as manifesting divine displeasure with humanity (counter-enlightenment) to a view stating that some (most) earthquakes could be explained naturalistically but, perhaps, some could not fully be so explained (moderate enlightenment). These divisions in thought might, without a great deal of modification, track easily to the present day.

There are five large parts to the book and many detailed subchapters. Part I, "The Radical Challenge" begins with the Lisbon earthquake and offers a detailed introduction to competing views of Enlightenment. Part II, "Rationalizing the Ancien Regime" begins with a perceptive, and somewhat unusual account of the skepticism of Hume viewed as a critique of radical enlightenment thinkers. Israel discusses the "Scotch" Enlightenment, and early attempts at moderate enlightenment in Germany, Italy, and Spain, among other things.

Part III of the book, "Europe and the Remaking of the World" discusses the American revolution, by, among other things, contrasting the views of John Adams and Tom Paine. Israel discusses enlightenment in Spain's American colonies, which he views as more influenced by radical thinkers than by the example of the thirteen colonies. He offers extended historical treatment of enlightenment ideas as they spread to India and the East through colonization and to Russia.

Part IV "Spinoza Controversies in the Later Enlightenment" was the part of the book of greatest interest to me. Israel discusses the different ways in which German thinkers such as Lessing, Mendelssohn, Goethe, and Jacobi read and attempted to make use of Spinoza. Israel offers a long discussion of Kant's critical philosophy, in metaphysics, ethics and politics, which he views as a moderate enlightenment programme directed primarily against Spinozism. Kant usually is seen as the seminal figure of modern philosophy. Israel argues as against Kant for the virtues of Spinoza's approach which rejects theology, embraces naturalism, and insists upon the primacy of human reason.

The final part of the book, "Revolution" consists of a study of the French Revolution and of the sources of radical enlightenment influence. In this section, as elswhere, Israel traces the surreptitious spread of radical enlightenment ideas. Israel's understanding of the Revolution is complex, as he admits that few of the participants had knowledge of philosophy or of the ideas of the philosophes. Yet, Israel argues that the ideas were there when they mattered and influenced fundamentally the course of the revolution's leaders. Israel argues, somewhat briefly, that the Terror, with Robespierre, constituted a rejection of the ideals of the French Revolution of reason, liberty, equality and constituted a return to a theological, particularistic, and sentimental manner of thinking that grew and persisted until, perhaps, the end of WW II. Israel is committed to the view that it is reason and equality that remains the salvation of humanity, rather than supernaturalism or relativism.

Israel has written a masterful challenging book, and trilogy, about the nature of Enlightenment as a period of history and as an ideal of human thought. Readers with patience and with a serious interest in the life of the mind will benefit from this wonderful study.

Robin Friedman
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Democratic Enlightenment - Philosophical Ideas of Vast Scope 4 July 2012
By JUMBIE - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The Introduction ( 33 of 1066 pages ) sets the arc of research and analysis of the entire trilogy on the Philosophical Enlightenment and its impact on history and our contemporary politics. Israel's studies have the scope of l'encyclopedie of Diderot ( which itself is analyzed ). I recommend this adventure to those of you would entertain ideas on human rights and freedom and to those of you who wish to delve the Ideas and the Ideals of the French Revolution and its antecedent - the American Revolution. Is there a Divine order - or is Nature alone our guide? Is that distinction at the core of the meaning of the Enlightenment?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Masterful! 14 Nov 2012
By Richard Jackson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am a big fan of Jonathan Israel's Enlightenment trilogy. While a lot of it is over my head (all those names!) the exegesis of "philosophy" in the 18th century is fascinating. Why only four stars? I thought the last quarter of the book was not well planned, the chapters jump around from subject to subject in an unorganized way. But that's my only grouse.
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Bought this book for history class 4 Feb 2013
By Vernon Ward - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love Jonathan Israel as a writer. He is prolific and his vocabulary is extensive. He is a professor at an ivy league university and is a very eloquent in his writing. I had to look up a word approximately every third page. THAT is what i love about his use of words. Most of the vocabulary that Professor Israel uses was actually invented or brought into use through translation at the very years he was writing about . . . astonishing.!!! I recommend reading all his books to establish an equitable speak on perceptions and values of authors on this subject. I enjoy how professor Israel shows how the middle class came into existence and became the greatest class of all time. Enlightenment had many entrances but the concept of free market needed a matrix that could be fair for all and for all time. Glory to God 2 timothy 1:7
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
roots of our pnagasaki 16 Oct 2013
By Bruce P. Barten - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
In addition to already being familiar with much of the material in this book and Darnton's The Forbidden Best-Sellers of Pre-Revolutionary France, I became a fan of Rousseau's opera Rousseau's "Le Devin Du Village" The Village Soothsayer as inspiring giggles when it was performed. Mozart wrote operas and died just after 1790, the end of the period in which opera tickets were so expensive that royalty could laugh all they wanted to at The Marriage of Figaro because nobody else could afford the tickets. Darnton and Israel give books much of the credit for having ideas that sometimes sparked riots, but Israel makes it clear that Geneva had a small group of 25 families who considered themselves rulers able to condemn, shred, and burn books by Rousseau. In response, Rousseau abjured Geneva citizenship. Voltaire wrote to Geneva that Rousseau had low moral standards because Rousseau had abandoned his five children as foundlings. French orphanages were home to about 20 percent of French children under five, but the 25 families ruling Geneva had better ideas about bring up kiddies before dropping them off at the pool.

The kind of cultural history based on books can be deadly boring for people who start at the beginning and try to remember what they are learning before governments change into something that can be shut down for nonpayment of whatever anybody wants the government to pay for. Monetary hogwash did not become a popular topic until education tried to make some understanding of social ecology relate to how much anybody could spend.
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