Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.
Deliverology 101: A Field Guide For Educational Leaders
 
 

Deliverology 101: A Field Guide For Educational Leaders [Kindle Edition]

Michael Barber , Andy Moffit , Paul Kihn
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £28.99
Kindle Price: £22.61 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: £6.38 (22%)
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £22.61  
Paperback £28.99  
Kindle Summer Sale: Over 500 Books from £0.99
Have you seen the Kindle Summer Sale yet? Browse selected books from popular authors and debut novelists, including new releases and bestsellers. Learn more


Product Description

Review

"Michael Barber has made a unique contribution to education reform by focusing firmly on how to get it done—delivery—as well as what to do. This book outlines steps that will enable courageous education leaders around the country to execute their plans and bridge the gap between hope and reality."
(Joel Klein, Former Chancellor 2010-05-28)

"No one knows system reform better than Sir Michael Barber. No one delivers it better—up close and practical. His delivery contains bold, inspiring, crystal clear ideas, never more timely than today. A must read for reformers at all levels of the system."
(Michael Fullan, Professor Emeritus 2010-05-28)

"Michael Barber's pioneering work as head of my Delivery Unit helped ensure real progress, not just with our education reforms, but with healthcare and policing too. It attracted worldwide attention. This guide distills the wisdom he gained at that time and has refined since. I strongly recommend it." (Tony Blair, Former UK Prime Minister 1997-2007 2010-05-28)

Product Description

Michael Barber, former chief advisor on delivery to British Prime Minister Tony Blair, provides steps to achieving public education reform in this practical field guide.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 22078 KB
  • Print Length: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Corwin; 1 edition (23 Nov 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008P5C5O6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #504,362 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
1 star
0
4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How to get things done in Education 9 May 2013
Format:Paperback
Although this book was specifically written for an audience of American education system leaders it is equally relevant to leaders in education systems worldwide, that is once you get past the Americanisms and the term 'deliverology' itself. If we understand any education system as being made up of the frontline institutions that deliver learning (e.g. schools or colleges), the middle tier (usually a form of regional administration) and central government, then Barber's book models a delivery chain method that joins up all three levels. The three levels are co-dependent and therefore jointly accountable for delivery of improvement policy. Traditionally there has been a disconnect between each level in terms of accountability, with each level being held independently responsible, often with separate audit methods, for its part within policy delivery. The implementation model Barber outlines will work if the policy for reforming an education system is owned by each level of the system, is based on robust and honest self-evaluation of where the system currently is and linked to appropriately challenging targets and trajectories for improvement. To me this is common sense but then the common sense barrier is often the hardest one to overcome in policy development and implementation.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I like this book because it tells me what i need to know on deleivering reform results
This is more foxed and written by expert in the field who have undewent the tasks
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Oh Dear 9 May 2012
Format:Paperback
Michael Barber helped by his new pals, has at last made the full shift to a USA approach to achieving nothing. If this is the stuff that drives US school improvement, it is unlikely to improve schools. Deliverology failed in the UK and it is failing or will fail, in the USA. It is in fact a failure in systems thinking. To say that this is a tedious read is an understatement. It takes me back many years to when school improvement started out and has clearly moved on not one jot. I could find nothing new and much that was without value. I cannot believe that some claim this to be a best seller: why?
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Codology 5 Jan 2012
By Dun - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
A sad testament to 'delusionology'. Barber destroyed the notion of "Public Service" with his crackpot "theories". His blinkered advocacy of a system of managing public services through the heavily rationalist and reductionist approach of imposing allegedly objective performance targets on service delivery continues in this sad tome. Compliance with targeted outcomes is assumed to evidence success and the easy measurement of performance against targets allows effective management and monitoring of that performance. Devilology deserves to be condemned for its actual effects: constraining innovation, creating an obsessive concern with a contrived and ill-conceived series of numbers and measures (to the detriment of actual performance), detracting from good quality service, and even encouraging cheating to meet mandated targets.
Please read "Systems Thinking in the Public Sector" by John Seddon published by Triarchy Press in 2008. Seddon presents a rigorous and belligerent critique of the Barberous ideology which was part of the failed and misguided reform regime of the Blair years which rather than reform public services in fact led to the dismantling and demoralization of Health, Education and Policing in the UK.
Barber's book is a dreadful effort based on self-aggrandization and a desire to carry on pedalling his tawdry wares.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How to get things done in Education 9 May 2013
By Chris Pin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Although this book was specifically written for an audience of American education system leaders it is equally relevant to leaders in education systems worldwide, that is once you get past the Americanisms and the term 'deliverology' itself. If we understand any education system as being made up of the frontline institutions that deliver learning (e.g. schools or colleges), the middle tier (usually a form of regional administration) and central government, then Barber's book models a delivery chain method that joins up all three levels. The three levels are co-dependent and therefore jointly accountable for delivery of improvement policy. Traditionally there has been a disconnect between each level in terms of accountability, with each level being held independently responsible, often with separate audit methods, for its part within policy delivery. The implementation model Barber outlines will work if the policy for reforming an education system is owned by each level of the system, is based on robust and honest self-evaluation of where the system currently is and linked to appropriately challenging targets and trajectories for improvement. To me this is common sense but then the common sense barrier is often the hardest one to overcome in policy development and implementation.
4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deliverology 101; Michael Barber 10 April 2011
By J. and L. Consulting - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This an outstanding book on how to deliver real change in education. It is full of strategies, templates and excellent commentary. Michael Barber is one of the few people in education who has really delivered change to a large system. He uses well known models plus his own work developed whilst working in the Blair Government as Head of the Delivery Unit. Hence the title. A recommended read for all those wanting to implement real change in education for the benefit of the students.Deliverology 101: A Field Guide For Educational Leaders
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category