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Delicatessen [1991] [US Import] [Blu-ray] [Region A]


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Product details

  • Actors: Marie-Laure Dougnac, Dominique Pinon, Pascal Benezech, Jean-Claude Dreyfus, Karin Viard
  • Directors: Jean-Pierre Jeunet, Marc Caro
  • Writers: Jean-Pierre Jeunet, Marc Caro, Gilles Adrien
  • Producers: Claudie Ossard
  • Format: Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, Dubbed, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: French, German, Spanish
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Norwegian
  • Dubbed: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: R (Restricted) (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Studio: Lions Gate
  • DVD Release Date: 14 Sep 2010
  • Run Time: 99 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00275EHVE
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 235,494 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

From Amazon.co.uk

Delicatessen presents a post-apocalyptic scenario set entirely in a dank and gloomy building where the landlord operates a delicatessen on the ground floor. But this is an altogether meatless world, so the butcher-landlord keeps his customers happy by chopping unsuspecting victims into cutlets, and he's sharpening his knife for the new tenant (French comic actor Dominque Pinon) who's got the hots for the butcher's near-sighted daughter. Delicatessen is a feast (if you will) of hilarious vignettes, slapstick gags, and sweetly eccentric characters, including a man in a swampy room full of frogs, a woman doggedly determined to commit suicide (she never gets it right) and a pair of brothers who make toy sound boxes that "moo" like cows.

It doesn't amount to much as a story, but that hardly matters; this is the kind of comedy that leaps from a unique wellspring of imagination and inspiration, and it's handled with such visual virtuosity that you can't help but be mesmerised. French co-directors of Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro have wildly inventive imaginations that gravitate to the darker absurdities of human behaviour, and their visual extravagance is matched by impressive technical skill. There's some priceless comedy here, some of which is so inventive that you may feel the urge to stand up and cheer. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

On the DVD: the special features are pretty standard, with a trailer, "making of" featurette and footage of the rehearsal process. The audio commentary is supplied by Jeunet, which, although interesting, is in French and thus necessitates the use of subtitles which then obliterate the movie's own subtitles. Once the commentary is on it is virtually impossible to turn this option off without reloading the disc. However, the Dolby stereo works wonders for this film, which is rich in sound, and surprisingly the 1.85:1 letterbox ratio is perfect for a film that is grainy by design. --Nikki Disney

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Brian G on 10 Oct 2003
Format: DVD
On its release, this French film caused much interest and praise due to its freshness and vitality. The joint debut of directors Marc Caro and Jean-Pierre Jeunet has distinctive visual style, a surreal yet clever plot, hilarious comic pieces and comedy timing making it a delightful, colourful, imaginative film of many surprises that refuses to become classified within any genre. You want the plot? You sure? Some time in the future, society has begun to collapse. A circus performer, Louison, gratefully takes a room in an apartment block owned by butcher Clapet as it’s advertised as being rent free in return for odd jobs. He encounters the building’s offbeat tenants such as the toy making Cube brothers, Aurore Interligator - who hears voices urging her to commit suicide and Mr Potin who lives in a water filled room filled with frogs and snails which he dines upon. The offer of free rent is just a trick to lure people who Clapet then butchers and sells off as meat to the other tenants. However, his shy daughter Julie falls in love with Louison and decides to save him - something that requires her to make a deal with the Trogolodists, the vegetarian terrorists that live in the sewers. Did I mention surreal? OK, so there’s the ‘plot’. For me, the beauty and magic of ‘Delicatessen’ is to just sit back, watch and enjoy the unexpected and hilarious pleasures unfold. An inventive film experience - an adventure, a comedy and a sheer joy to savour as it sparkles with originality.
The special extras are real bonus features that add so much to the collectability of this little gem. The movie itself is in French or German, Italian or Spanish Audio Dialogue with choices of English, German, Dutch, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish Subtitles.
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38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 25 Mar 2002
Format: DVD
This film is a must for those who like the weird humour of Amelie. But before I mislead you the style and black humour are the only links between this and Amelie. The film is set in a post-nucleur holocaust France, where meat is in short supply.
The response of the local buthcher shop is to provide a meat supply from the nearby changing clientele of a guest house (I'm not giving anything away here as the cover has a human head on a plate!!!) As I said black humour! The plot revolves around Dominque Pinon (Also In Amelie) as a new arrival to the guest house...
The butchers daughter falls in love with him causing an exciting, funny turn of events, exemplified by the a vigilante vegetarian group!
The film is a magnificent montage of different filming techniques, the use of colour and sound to convey the strangeness of the time.
Simply put it is brilliant, funny and a great way to spend an evening- even if it does put you off meat for a while!!!!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Budge Burgess on 20 Feb 2005
Format: DVD
A macabre little fantasia from Jean-Pierre Jeunet (who would go on to make "Amelie" and "A very long engagement"). He uses a simple plot device. Let this be a France which has succumbed to some dystopian nightmare, which has slipped into a condition of economic collapse where there is no food ... and the currency has dissolved, leaving barter the only form of exchange. This is a world where a bag of lentils will take you places. Now, take a dingy, dank tenement block, set on its own ... maybe some distance beyond the outskirts of town ... maybe not. Fill its rooms with an oddball bunch of tenants. Let the tenement belong to a psychotic butcher, who remains in business by harvesting the handymen he lures into the spare apartment. Now, let's complicate the action: let the latest handyman be some scrawny little bloke, a former circus performer, and let the butcher's daughter fall for him ... and enlist the aid of the underground to try to protect him from her father's meat cleaver.
Like I say, a simple little plot device. It works beautifully. 'Delicatessen' is quite a remarkable little film. Shot on a low budget, it is exemplary for anyone wanting to make movies: it helps if you have talent as a director and can enlist a highly competent crew of technicians and professionals; you will need an excellent script; and a superb cast won't go amiss.
It's a lovely script. The test of a good story is how quickly you suspend disbelief. You are riveted from the opening shots. You absorb the notion that this is a world with no currency and little food, where, frankly, anything is possible. You settle to enjoy the film. And your attention is held by the cast.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By @GeekZilla9000 TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 21 Nov 2011
Format: Blu-ray
Take the surrealist `sixties British comedy The Bed Sitting Room, blend it with elements of Sweeney Todd and if you have enough French humour to add into the mix then you may come somewhere close to Delicatessen. The film is set during an unknown time after some sort of unspecified but presumably apocalyptic event. Food is scarce and the delicatessen at the base of an apartment block accepts grain as currency in exchange for meat, but with there being no land suitable for pasture, meat is a scarce commodity - luckily butcher and landlord Clapet has a regular supply of livestock.

After answering a job advert, ex-circus performer Louison finds himself Clapet's latest lodger and on site handyman, though it's a position which tends not to last for long. Unaware that he is due to be sold as steaks, joints and mince, Louison is enthusiastic about his role and manages to befriend the daughter of his employer. There's little plot to this French cult title, instead we have a strange set-up full of even stranger characters and it's their quirky ways which form the main substance of the picture. Marc Caro and Jean-Pierre Jeunet's collaboration has resulted in a dark comedy with plenty of visual humour from the funniest sex scene ever to botched suicide attempts. The grim plot doesn't make this a grisly film, it's light hearted, wacky and farcical in the right places. It's almost like a cartoon translated into live-action and Dominique Pinon is superb in the lead role, his face is oddly handsome and so expressive, he has an almost childlike quality to him which makes him captivating to watch.
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