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Delano Paperback – Jan 1999


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Product details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Parnassus (Jan 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0966481615
  • ISBN-13: 978-0966481617
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 14 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,692,060 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

An American campus novel with some of the biting wit Heller
brought to war in Catch-22 applied to academia. -- The Rough Guide to Cult Fiction, April 2005

Delano is a reader engaging, deliriously satirical, and enthusiastically recommended tale. -- Midwest Book Review, November 14, 2002

Orozco's writing is witty and biting, the characters are memorable, and the political atmosphere of higher education...is very entertaining. -- The Best Reviews, November 21, 2002

[Orozco] just hit the jackpot...[with his] satire about the excesses of idealism on college campuses during the 1970s and the hypocrisy that was rampant. -- The Leader, Jan. 23, 1999

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Richard Johnson on 13 April 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is a tough one to score. On the scale of literary accomplishments it's probably a 2, but for pure, unadulterated fun, it's a 5. Depends how you get your kicks. Personally, I think life is just too short to plough through Salman Rushdie's banal forests of words; sometimes a simple idea is best. Delano is that - unpretentious, easy to read and clearly written with great enjoyment and tongue-in-cheek. It follows the fortunes of the main character - Delano - as he blags his way through University and then through the immediate years afterwards. It's a comedy with a sprinkling of a love story and a shot of a thriller at the end which culminates in a rather...bizarre finish, but funny nonetheless. Anyway, by the time you get there you'll have so warmed to this book that you'll find it as wonderful as I did. Just don't take this book or life too seriously and you'll laugh as much as I did.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 Feb 2003
Format: Paperback
This American writer is an undiscovered treasure. I laughed from page one right to the very last line. In the tradition of Evlyn Waugh and Joseph Heller, John Orozco's novel lampoons American institutions with the satirical needle of satire. No institution in his sights escapes criticism.
This is one of the funniest books I've ever read. If you are looking for humor, look no further-- this is it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 19 Mar 2003
Format: Paperback
This book reveals the gap between appearance and reality. Orozco's superb sense of irony sooths what would otherwise be a very painful look at the double standards of society.
The author needles every aspect of society that he challenges, and it is very funny. I highly recommend this book.
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By A Customer on 4 April 2003
Format: Paperback
Delano is sarcastic, funny, and sadly, right on the nose. Orozco's Heller-esque commentary on the absurdities that permeate schools everywhere is testament to a system that becomes alarmingly more inept each year. His tongue in cheek depiction of educators more concerned with political correctness and rampant cronyism than the business of learning is absolutely on target!
And for even more laughs on the crippled American school system, I suggest Lenny Castellaneta's "No One's Even Bleeding."
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 31 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Delano is a stitch! 17 Mar 1999
By Ralph La Rosa - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Eddie Delano and his world are a stitch! And like surgical stitches, Orozco's satirical needlings of domestic and college life sting as well as correct social and psychological deformities that characterized the surreal sixties. No target, large or small, eludes the author's jaundiced eye (check out the back cover art) or his sharp-honed pen--you'll feel its prick on every page. One asks no more of good satire. Combining the complete arsenal of satirical, humorous, comedic, slapstick, and burlesque techniques, this novel starts you laughing and wincing on page one, with Eddie's admission that he shot off his big toe to avoid Viet Nam, and sustains it through the hilariously implausible and implosive self-destruction of the whole sick crew. And they are legion: hustlers, cheaters, political poseurs, worm farmers, gender freaks, and doobie brothers (all of whom inhale). If you participated, especially as a student, in those hallucinogenic days, had children who did, taught that generation, or just nostalgically miss those sweet, sweaty summers of love, this is the book for you. Almost forgot. There's some interesting sex, too.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
A light-hearted satire for post-modern Guys 9 Mar 2004
By D. M. Paine - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I say Guys with a capital G because this is written for us, and not for women. Sometimes I share a book with my wife, but not this one...not that it's X-rated, but it revels in Delano's pursuit of women. It is also NOT a very political book, in spite of some of the other reviews here. Instead, the focus is on the cynical and often funny way Delano exploits affirmative action programs, runs into or avoids zealots from both the left and the right, and generally learns to manipulate the system for personal gain.
This was a fun read for me. I realized right away it would not be heavy, and it had minimal personal or intellectual insight. But that was OK. I think Orozco is saying indirectly, we all take these things way too seriously, let's pursue some happiness in life.
And the best thing about Delano is that he DOES learn some lessons along the way, about honesty, love, and devotion. I won't give away any surprises, but the plot spirals into a situation where he finally has to make some choices, and thanks to making the right friends, he makes the right choices. That, and no political theme or social statement, is the greatest reward of reading Delano.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Sarcastic yet poignant 4 Oct 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Delano is sarcastic, funny, and sadly, right on the nose. Orozco's Heller-esque commentary on the absurdities that permeate schools everywhere is testament to a system that becomes alarmingly more inept each year. His tongue in cheek depiction of educators more concerned with political correctness and rampant cronyism than the business of learning is absolutely on target!
And for even more laughs on our crippled school system, I suggest Lenny Castellaneta's "No One's Even Bleeding".
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
a nice book without much twist 15 Feb 2004
By Libri Mundi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First of all let me put the disclaimer - 4 stars reflects just my own opinion - this book is great and easy to read and I will recommend you to read this book. The book is around 170 pages but those are of pure laughter and joy.
Delano is the prime character of this book - he is trying to use his Hispanic heritage to get in the college and finally gets in using the black lineage which never existed. Delano does not represent the general masses rather he signifies the few who does not run with the masses. The book draws a nice picture of Woodstock culture which swept USA in 1970s. Delano is against the war but he is also against the aimless fight against all government institution. Delano is rational but not heartless. The other characters like girl friends Alice and Ashley, room-mate Sam, friend philosopher and guide Winston, friend Conrad - they are all insanely funny. A special note for Sam with his worm farming, weed selling and dead animal hauling activities is just beyond imagination. Sometimes some of the plots are little unrealistic like the whole Baba Rama affair and feds. etc. Some of the stories of Del Norte seems to be eternally true for all colleges and universities at all ages and never lose their charm.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
"Who are you, really?" 16 Aug 2001
By Dr Blues - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I have read this several times, and still enjoy it. From the opening line through the end, I laughed and cried.
The novel is a farce, set against the backdrop of college in the 1970's on the GI bill--but as with most farces, it has a serious point. The lead character, Eddie Delano, discovers that almost everyone he meets hides a true identity behind a facade.
Since Delano has gone around my circle of friends, we often refer to people and events from the book as if they were real. I sometimes describe acquaintances as 'a little like Sam' or having 'Alice's taste in health food!' This book prompted me to ask myself, 'How many of us went through that era pretending to be someone different than who we really were?' Yet I find that younger friends (who didn't 'survive' the 60's and 70's) recognize that in the book even sooner.
I give Delano thumbs up for the kind of love of human beings, with all our quirks and hangups, that you find in authors from a previous age.
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